‘Like zero’ chance of seismic tests off NC in next drilling ban, interior secretary says

Although President Donald Trump has expanded an offshore drilling moratorium to federal waters off North Carolina, conservation groups are concerned coastal environments could still be endangered by seismic testing.

The U.S. Department of Justice said in a court filing last week that moratoriums against drilling off of North Carolina and other Southeastern states do not prevent companies from conducting seismic testing, a method of mapping oil and natural gas deposits under the ocean floor by blasting loud noises from an array of air guns.. But in an interview with the News & Observer, U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt said he thinks the moratorium means there is “like zero” chance seismic testing will happen off of the North Carolina coast.

“The president’s action means that it’s extraordinarily unlikely, in my opinion, that there will ever be seismic done in these areas because the entire point of doing it for these companies — in order to want to sell it — is gone,” Bernhardt said.

Environmental groups disagree. Kristen Monsell, a spokeswoman for the Center for Biological Diversity Action Fund, said that even though the Atlantic seaboard was never opened to offshore drilling in the 2010s, several companies still submitted seismic testing applications to the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management.

“I think that shows that oil and seismic companies will try to get into areas regardless of what’s open to leasing to do seismic to see what’s out there, and if they can find something, then push to have it open,” Monsell said.

The Center for Biological Diversity is one of many plaintiffs in a federal lawsuit filed in South Carolina trying to block the permitting of seismic testing, a lawsuit joined by N.C. Attorney General Josh Stein. The Department of Justice memo regarding seismic testing and the moratoriums was in response to that lawsuit.

Four companies have outstanding applications and incidental harm authorizations, allowing them to kill or ham wildlife as a side effect of the seismic activity. Another company, WesternGeco, withdrew its application earlier this year.

In a letter to N.C. Department of Environmental Quality officials, WesternGeco said its testing would have included blasting during roughly 208 days over a yearlong period, with sounds ranging from 225 to 260 decibels.

Oceana, an ocean conservancy group, is also a plaintiff in the South Carolina lawsuit. Diane Hoskins, a spokeswoman for Oceana’s advocacy partner, Oceana Action, said the moratorium’s protections do not go far enough.

“If the four companies pull their applications, that would be the level of certainty our coastal economies deserve,” Hoskins said, later adding, “This an investment in the future of offshore drilling that our states and coastal economies don’t want.”

North Carolina environmental officials have formally objected to seismic testing, saying the loud sounds could harm coastal activities such as fishing and tourism and are inconsistent with state coastal policies.

The U.S. Department of Commerce granted WesternGeco’s appeal to that state decision, and the matter is now the subject of a federal lawsuit. Although

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Trump offshore drilling ban doesn’t stop NC seismic testing

U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt said there is very little chance of seismic testing moving forward off of the N.C. coast while offshore drilling moratoriums are in place. This photo shows Platform Holly, an oil drilling rig in the Santa Barbara Channel offshore of the city of Goleta, California.

U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt said there is very little chance of seismic testing moving forward off of the N.C. coast while offshore drilling moratoriums are in place. This photo shows Platform Holly, an oil drilling rig in the Santa Barbara Channel offshore of the city of Goleta, California.

AP

Although President Donald Trump has expanded an offshore drilling moratorium to federal waters off North Carolina, conservation groups are concerned coastal environments could still be endangered by seismic testing.

The U.S. Department of Justice said in a court filing last week that moratoriums against drilling off of North Carolina and other Southeastern states do not prevent companies from conducting seismic testing, a method of mapping oil and natural gas deposits under the ocean floor by blasting loud noises from an array of air guns.. But in an interview with the News & Observer, U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt said he thinks the moratorium means there is “like zero” chance seismic testing will happen off of the North Carolina coast.

“The president’s action means that it’s extraordinarily unlikely, in my opinion, that there will ever be seismic done in these areas because the entire point of doing it for these companies — in order to want to sell it — is gone,” Bernhardt said.

Environmental groups disagree. Kristen Monsell, a spokeswoman for the Center for Biological Diversity Action Fund, said that even though the Atlantic seaboard was never opened to offshore drilling in the 2010s, several companies still submitted seismic testing applications to the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management.

“I think that shows that oil and seismic companies will try to get into areas regardless of what’s open to leasing to do seismic to see what’s out there, and if they can find something, then push to have it open,” Monsell said.

The Center for Biological Diversity is one of many plaintiffs in a federal lawsuit filed in South Carolina trying to block the permitting of seismic testing, a lawsuit joined by N.C. Attorney General Josh Stein. The Department of Justice memo regarding seismic testing and the moratoriums was in response to that lawsuit.

Four companies have outstanding applications and incidental harm authorizations, allowing them to kill or ham wildlife as a side effect of the seismic activity. Another company, WesternGeco, withdrew its application earlier this year.

In a letter to N.C. Department of Environmental Quality officials, WesternGeco said its testing would have included blasting during roughly 208 days over a yearlong period, with sounds ranging from 225 to 260 decibels.

Oceana, an ocean conservancy group, is also a plaintiff in the South Carolina lawsuit. Diane Hoskins, a spokeswoman for Oceana’s advocacy partner, Oceana Action, said the moratorium’s protections do not go far enough.

“If the four companies pull their applications, that would be the level of certainty our coastal economies deserve,” Hoskins said, later adding, “This an investment in the future of offshore drilling that our states and coastal economies don’t want.”

North Carolina environmental

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How to Attach Wall Decor Without Drilling Holes in the Siding

Sidings are used to protect a building from rain, wind, and other harsh elements. They can be in the form of plastic, wood, metal, or cement attached to the structure. To avoid damaging it while beautifying your home, here are some alternative ways to hang a wall decor without drilling in the sidings such as:

Double-sided tape

Sidings are made of different materials and one of which is plastic. A double-sided adhesive tape is a good choice to get away with drilling while hanging a wall decor. No more using of hammer to fix a decor on place. All you need is to choose something that has lightweight since adhesive tapes are not that sturdy.

Monkey Hooks

Built-in hooks attached at the back of the decors are already popular alternatives to nails. This is ideal for wood sidings where you can push the small hook against it. It may be a weather-resistant wood such as the redwood and cedar, or a cheaper version, which is plywood. Hooks produce cleaner result that is more convenient to use. Unlike before where you have to use drills to hang decors on your wall, with the advancement of technology, everything is just a one step away.

3M hanging strips

Just like an adhesive tape, hanging strips best suit plastic as well as metal sidings. Since these are made of high quality materials, the strips are like glue that stick on the surface. Although strong, these are not made for large decors because the materials are intended to hold an average load only.

Vinyl siding hooks

No need to drill or use a hammer, just slip it under the vinyl siding and you now have an instant hook for your iron wall decor. With a capacity of as much as 10 pounds, it can be attached and removed anytime you want to. It is specially designed for vinyl, which is a handy hook that usually comes in a set of 4. Made of small metals whose both ends are curved, one end is used for fixing in place while, the other end is for hanging the decor.

Super glue

If you are in dire need to hang a decor without the creating a hole, I suggest you try a super glue to hold it in place. It has a strength that can hold heavy weight with just a drop of it. However, you can no longer transfer it from one place to another.

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