Rose Garden COVID ‘superspreader’ at White House drew hundreds

More than 200 people attended the Sept. 26 event at the White House Rose Garden where President Donald Trump announced his nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court.

The festive function – which drew high-profile public officials, religious leaders and other dignitaries – has since been called a likely coronavirus “superspreader” after nearly a dozen people in attendance later tested positive for COVID-19.

Among attendees testing positive are Trump and first lady Melania Trump; former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie; former counselor to the president Kellyanne Conway, Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah; Sen. Thom Tillis, R-N.C.; Notre Dame President Rev. John Jenkins; pastor and evangelist Greg Laurie; and freelance photographer Al Drago.

USA TODAY is attempting to identify every person at the event using publicly available photographs of that day. If you know of someone who is not on our list, please fill out this form.

We think we’ve identified the following people. The names in bold indicate those who have tested positive for coronavirus since the White House event. Seated on the left: 

1. Kate Todd, White House lawyer

2. Rebecca Cipollone, Pat Cipollone’s wife

3. Pat Cipollone, White House counsel

4. Mark Meadows, White House chief of staff

5. William Barr, U.S. attorney general

6. Tiffany Trump, president’s daughter

7. Karen Pence, second lady

8. Mike Pence, vice president

9. Sen. Deb Fischer, R-Neb.

10. Sen. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn.

11. Sen. Mike Crapo, R-Idaho

12. Sen. Thom Tillis, R-N.C.

13. Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo.

14. Sen. Ben Sasse, R-Neb.

15. Sharon Lee, wife of Sen. Mike Lee

16. Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah

23. Rep. Mike Johnson, R-La.

24. Sen. Kelly Loeffler, R-Ga.

31. Alyssa Farah, White House communications director

32. Kayleigh McEnany, White House press secretary

33. Michael Farris, president and CEO, Alliance Defending Freedom

41. Robert O’Brien, national security adviser

44. Kay Coles James, President, Heritage Foundation

46. O. Carter Snead, Notre Dame professor of law

48. Maureen Blum, president, SCI

53. Ed Whelan, president, Ethics and Public Policy Center

54. Jenna Ellis, Senior legal adviser for the president’s campaign 

56. Maureen Ferguson, senior fellow for Catholic Association

57. Michael Ferguson, former House member from New Jersey

65. Jeffrey Wall, solicitor general

75. Nicole Stelle Garnett, Notre Dame law professor

84. Mercedes Schlapp, Senior adviser for Trump-Pence Campaign

85. Matt Schlapp, lobbyist and chair of the American Conservative Union

86. Tom Fitton, president, Judicial Watch

And, seated on the right:

First Lady Melania Trump

102. Jesse Barrett, husband of Amy Coney Barrett

107. The Barrett babysitter

108. Kellyanne Conway, counselor to the president

109. Patricia Scalia, wife of Eugene Scalia

110. Eugene Scalia, Labor secretary, son of the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia

111. Maureen Scalia, widow of the late Justice Antonin Scalia

112. Father Paul Scalia, another son of the Scalias

113. Alex Azar, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services secretary

114. Jeffrey Rosen, deputy U.S. attorney general

115. Laura Ingraham, FOX News host

118. C. Boyden Gray, Washington, D.C., attorney and

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Likely Rose Garden COVID ‘superspreader’ at White House drew hundreds

More than 200 people attended the Sept. 26 event at the White House Rose Garden where President Donald Trump announced his nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court.

The festive function – which drew high-profile public officials, religious leaders and other dignitaries – has since been called a likely coronavirus “superspreader” after nearly a dozen people in attendance later tested positive for COVID-19.

Among attendees testing positive are Trump and first lady Melania Trump; former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie; former counselor to the president Kellyanne Conway, Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah; Sen. Thom Tillis, R-N.C.; Notre Dame President Rev. John Jenkins; pastor and evangelist Greg Laurie; and freelance photographer Al Drago.

USA TODAY is attempting to identify every person at the event using publicly available photographs of that day. If you know of someone who is not on our list, please fill out this form.

We think we’ve identified the following people. The names in bold indicate those who have tested positive for coronavirus since the White House event. Seated on the left: 

1. Kate Todd, White House lawyer

2. Rebecca Cipollone, Pat Cipollone’s wife

3. Pat Cipollone, White House counsel

4. Mark Meadows, White House chief of staff

5. William Barr, U.S. attorney general

6. Tiffany Trump, president’s daughter

7. Karen Pence, second lady

8. Mike Pence, vice president

9. Sen. Deb Fischer, R-Neb.

10. Sen. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn.

11. Sen. Mike Crapo, R-Idaho

12. Sen. Thom Tillis, R-N.C.

13. Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo.

14. Sen. Ben Sasse, R-Neb.

15. Sharon Lee, wife of Sen. Mike Lee

16. Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah

23. Rep. Mike Johnson, R-La.

24. Sen. Kelly Loeffler, R-Ga.

31. Alyssa Farah, White House communications director

32. Kayleigh McEnany, White House press secretary

33. Michael Farris, president and CEO, Alliance Defending Freedom

41. Robert O’Brien, national security adviser

44. Kay Coles James, President, Heritage Foundation

46. O. Carter Snead, Notre Dame professor of law

48. Maureen Blum, president, SCI

53. Ed Whelan, president, Ethics and Public Policy Center

54. Jenna Ellis, Senior legal adviser for the president’s campaign 

56. Maureen Ferguson, senior fellow for Catholic Association

57. Michael Ferguson, former House member from New Jersey

65. Jeffrey Wall, solicitor general

75. Nicole Stelle Garnett, Notre Dame law professor

84. Mercedes Schlapp, Senior adviser for Trump-Pence Campaign

85. Matt Schlapp, lobbyist and chair of the American Conservative Union

86. Tom Fitton, president, Judicial Watch

And, seated on the right:

First Lady Melania Trump

99. One of the Barretts’ children

100. One of the Barretts’ children

101. One of the Barretts’ children

102. Jesse Barrett, husband of Amy Coney Barrett

103. One of the Barretts’ children

104. One of the Barretts’ children

105. One of the Barretts’ children

106. One of the Barretts’ children

107. The Barrett babysitter

108. Kellyanne Conway, counselor to the president

109. Patricia Scalia, wife of Eugene Scalia

110. Eugene Scalia, Labor secretary, son of the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia

111. Maureen Scalia, widow of the late Justice Antonin

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Democrat-turned-Republican Van Drew trails Amy Kennedy in New Jersey House race: poll

Democratic-turned-GOP Rep. Jeff Van DrewJeff Van DrewThe Hill’s Campaign Report: 19 years since 9/11 | Dem rival to Marjorie Taylor Greene drops out | Collin Peterson faces fight of his career | Court delivers blow to ex-felon voting rights in Florida The Hill’s 12:30 Report: First Kennedy to lose a Massachusetts election Ex-Democrat Van Drew speaks at GOP convention MORE (N.J.) is trailing Democrat Amy Kennedy in the race for New Jersey’s 2nd Congressional District, according to a Monmouth University poll released on Monday. 

Forty-nine percent of registered voters polled said they supported Kennedy, while 44 percent said they backed Van Drew in the South Jersey district. 

The same poll showed Kennedy leading in high voter turnout and low voter turnout scenarios as well. Kennedy beat Van Drew 50 percent to 44 percent in a high voter turnout scenario and 51 percent to 44 percent in a low turnout scenario. 

Additionally, Kennedy holds a bigger lead among Democrats than Van Drew does with Republicans. Ninety-four percent of Democrats said they supported Kennedy while 89 percent of Republicans said the same about Van Drew.

Kennedy is a former teacher and mental health advocate. She announced her candidacy in January, calling Trump and Van Drew “symptoms of a bigger sickness infecting our country and our politics.” 

Van Drew became a prime target for Democrats earlier this year when he announced that he would oppose President TrumpDonald John TrumpQuestions remain unanswered as White House casts upbeat outlook on Trump’s COVID-19 fight White House staffers get email saying to stay home if they experience coronavirus symptoms White House says ‘appropriate precautions’ were taken for Trump’s outing to see supporters MORE‘s impeachment and that he was leaving the Democratic Party for the Republican Party. He won his seat as a Democrat in 2018. 

The congressman explained his party-switch at the Republican National Convention in August. 

“I was elected to Council as a Democrat, but as I won seats for county office, state legislature and then Congress, I noticed things were changing — the Democrat Party had become less accepting of American tradition, less believing in American exceptionalism, less supportive of traditional faith and family,” he said. “This was not the party that I knew.” 

The nonpartisan Cook Political Report rates the race as a “toss-up.”

The Monmouth University poll was conducted on from Sept. 26 to Oct. 1 among 588 voters in New Jersey’s second congressional district. The margin of error is plus or minus 4.1 percentage points.  

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Drew Barrymore just released gorgeous home decor for fall, and we want everything

The Telegraph

Lord Frost insists EU needs to work on more realistic policy positions on Brexit

The Prime Minister’s chief Brexit negotiator hinted at progress in the trade talks last night, but insisted the EU still needed to be more “realistic” about the rules that the UK could accept. Lord Frost said the last fortnight of informal talks with Michel Barnier, his Brussels counterpart, had been “relatively positive”, as he suggested that the EU had scaled back on some “unrealistic ambitions”. The two sides have been at loggerheads over fishing rights in British waters and EU demands for the UK to continue following the bloc’s rules on industrial subsidies. Government sources have also claimed that the EU’s method of conducting the negotiations has led to “paralysis”, with Mr Barnier insisting on slowing down talks on less contentious issues in order to focus on the most difficult areas. Mr Barnier is believed to have given ground on his previous insistence on “parallelism” in the talks. Lord Frost said: “As we enter the final stages of negotiations we are all focusing on what it might take to get a trade agreement in place. “An agreement is still very much possible, but equally very far from certain. The last two weeks of informal talks have been relatively positive, but there remains much to be done, and time is short. “We have been saying from the beginning of this process that we simply want a standard free trade agreement like Canada’s. Sadly the EU’s position has not been so straightforward and we continue to be asked to accept provisions which do not reflect the reality of the change which our exit from the EU brings. “If the gaps in these areas are to be bridged, the EU still needs to scale back more of its unrealistic ambitions and work on more realistic policy positions. I hope this will be possible this coming week, and I and my team are ready to work as hard as necessary to move things forward.” On Monday, Michael Gove will take part in a meeting of the joint UK-EU committee on the Withdrawal Agreement, when he is likely to come under renewed pressure to drop provisions in the Internal Market Bill which would allow ministers to override parts of the 2019 deal. Meanwhile, the Confederation of British Industry released polling showing that three-quarters of businesses (77 per cent) favour the two sides striking a post-Brexit trade agreement, with 18 per cent expressing no preference between a deal or no deal. Some 4 per cent favoured a no-deal outcome. Dame Carolyn Fairbairn, the CBI Director-General, who was pictured alongside Rishi Sunak, the Chancellor last week, said: “Next week Brexit talks enter the eleventh hour. Now must be the time for political leadership and the spirit of compromise to shine through on both sides. A deal can and must be made. “More than three-quarters of businesses want to see a deal that will support people’s jobs and livelihoods. This matters for

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Drew Barrymore released gorgeous home decor for fall, and we want everything

Our team is dedicated to finding and telling you more about the products and deals we love. If you love them too and decide to purchase through the links below, we may receive a commission. Pricing and availability are subject to change. 

It’s hard to find home decor collections that truly blow me away when it comes to patterns, colors and style. But Drew Barrymore’s Flower Home line never disappoints.

While the actress has been building up her empire with Flower Beauty and a daytime talk show aptly named “The Drew Barrymore Show,” her Flower Home collection at Walmart might be my favorite project from the star — despite one of her most-loved movies “50 First Dates,” of course.

Barrymore launched the first Flower Home collection back in March 2019, and her latest fall collection is some of her most beautifully designed products yet.

Drew Barrymore Flower Home

“My design process is that I care about every detail, every colorway, every pattern and every shape,” Drew Barrymore said in a press release, which I can attest to.

She once personally told me the same thing when I met her at a press preview — I could hear her passion as she talked about the inspiration behind even the tiniest details of each item.

Drew Barrymore Flower Home

Not only do all of the furniture pieces, dishware and decor accessories all have a dash of eclecticism to them, but each item is available at an affordable price point. It makes the pieces great for first-apartment decor.

And if you’ve been wanting to add wallpaper to a small room or bathroom, the Flower Home line has peel-and-stick wallpaper and murals, so you can (temporarily) amp up your space even if you’re renting.

Drew Barrymore Flower Home

If you want to get your creative juices flowing for a home decor refresh, you might want to browse Flower Home’s newest arrivals that were made for maximalists. Below, we’ve rounded everything from Barrymore’s new fall collection that we can’t stop swooning over.

Shop: Botanical Watercolor 16-Piece Dinnerware Set, $60

Shop: Natural Rattan Basket Set Of 2, $45

Shop: Botanical Floral Peel And Stick Mural, $69

Shop: Pink Velvet Armchair, $299.99

Shop: Floral White Ceramic Table Lamp With Teal Shade, $79

Shop: Carved Wood Storage Cabinet, $299

Shop: Antique Brass Arch Floor Lamp With Tiered Rattan Shade, $120

Shop: Round Wood Mirror With Shelf, $69

If you liked this story, you might like to read about celebrity beauty collections, including Drew Barrymore’s Flower Beauty.

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The post Drew Barrymore released gorgeous home decor for fall, and we want everything appeared first on In The Know.

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House Races Feature Party-Switcher Van Drew, Dems on Defense | Pennsylvania News

By MIKE CATALINI, Associated Press

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — The presidential contest in New Jersey doesn’t look competitive, with Joe Biden leading Donald Trump by double digits, but a handful of the state’s dozen House districts are shaping up as competitive.

New Jersey voters will be electing representatives in all 12 U.S. House districts in November’s first-ever mostly mail-in election.

Democrats are on defense in three seats they picked up in 2018, but perhaps the highest-profile race is in the 2nd District where Republican incumbent Rep. Jeff Van Drew faces Democrat Amy Kennedy for the seat he won as a Democrat in 2018.

Van Drew gained national attention for switching parties during the House impeachment of the Republican Trump, saying there was no place for him in the Democratic Party as an opponent of impeachment. The defection won Van Drew, who pledged his “undying support” to the president, an Oval Office visit as well as a Trump rally in Wildwood. He also had a speaking role at the Republican National Convention.

In all of the most watched districts, unaffiliated voters have the most registrations, followed by Democrats. Republicans are outnumbered by Democrats across New Jersey by more than 1 million registered voters. Democrats recently surpassed people registered as unaffiliated and currently have 177,000 more registrations.

A look at some of the most-watched races:

Van Drew is well known in the district, and the GOP there has embraced him, even after spending years trying to defeat him in the state Legislature, where he served as a Democrat.

Kennedy is a former teacher and the spouse of former Rhode Island Democratic Rep. Patrick Kennedy. Kennedy is the son of former U.S. Sen. Ted Kennedy.

New Jersey’s 2nd District covers about the southern third of the state and includes all or part of eight counties. It runs from the southern Philadelphia suburbs in the west to the shore resort towns along the Atlantic Ocean, including Atlantic and Ocean cities.

There are about 707,000 people in the district, according to the Census Bureau. More than 500,000 residents are white, while over 91,000 are Black. Hispanics account for 121,000. The median income is $68,000.

Van Drew won the district in 2018 by eight points over Republican Trump supporter Seth Grossman.

Freshman Democratic incumbent Rep. Andy Kim faces former Hill International executive David Richter, the Republican in the race. Richter had planned to run against Van Drew but changed districts when he switched parties.

The 3rd District stretches from suburban Philadelphia’s Burlington County in the west, across the Pinelands, to Ocean County in the east. Burlington is a Democratic stronghold, while Ocean is reliably Republican.

The district’s 736,000 people have a median income of about $86,000, according to the Census Bureau. About 582,000 residents are white. Eighty-five thousand are Black, while 67,000 are Hispanic.

Kim defeated Republican Rep. Tom MacArthur in 2018 by one point, in part because of Democratic strength in Burlington.

Freshman Democrat Tom Malinowski is taking on Tom Kean Jr., the state Senate

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