Kristin Cavallari’s New Kitchen Pantry Is Every Type-A Organizer’s Dream Come True

From Delish

Kristin Cavallari gave us a tour of her brand new home kitchen and her pantry, and the items she keeps around are perfect for cooking, baking, and snacking. The Very Cavallari star has plans to change some things around in her new space since she just moved in about three months ago, but so far everything looks like an absolute dream.

The main alteration Kristin hopes to make for her kitchen is turning the stovetop into a full stove range so she can have another oven in her space. She cooks every day, so the extra space would be helpful when she prepares meals. Kristin also makes it a point to leave some things out and about her space.

“I love when kitchens look lived in because that’s real life so I always kind of have stuff out,” she said as she showed off the countertop next to the stove. This is where she keeps olive oil, coconut oil, pink Himalayan salt, truffle salt, a copper tea kettle, and a her Dutch oven.

Her pantry is one of her favorite spots, though, and there’s even a ladder so she can reach the top of her shelves for whatever she needs. There’s a sweetener section where she keeps everything from maple syrup to real honeycomb (the latter of which she likes to add to charcuterie boards). Right beside that, Kristin keeps her vitamins and minerals, chickpea and buckwheat pasta, and black rice.

Things you’ll never find in her pantry include white salt, white sugar, and white flour Instead, she’ll cook with substitutes like oat or coconut flour and natural sweeteners. One of her favorite alternatives is the Birch Benders paleo banana pancakes. Kristin likes to cook with these sorts of ingredients and keeps a lot of her meals gluten-free, and thankfully she’s sharing some of her gluten-free comfort food recipes in her recently released cookbook True Comfort.

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Award-winning Chattanooga designer offers tips on creating your dream kitchen

When Jackie Howard gets a call for one of her award-winning kitchen designs, her first thought is, “Please, not another white kitchen.”

The founder and owner of Scarlett’s Cabinetry, Howard has spent more than 30 years making clients’ dreams for their home come true. Her designs garnered her the title of “Best of the Best” in this year’s people’s choice awards by the Chattanooga Times Free Press.

Howard has seen countless trends come and go — like white kitchens, which have endured since the 1920s, when white was about the only color on offer. The country had just come out of the Spanish flu pandemic and a gleaming white kitchen was associated with sterilization, a huge selling point at the time.

Today’s crisp white kitchens can speak of cleanliness or homeyness, elegance or minimalism. In a word, they remain timeless.

“White kitchens still sell homes,” Howard says.

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Award-winning Chattanooga offers tips for designing your kitchen

But today’s kitchens are no longer sequestered at the back of the house, tucked behind swinging doors and walls. They are the heart of the home both literally and figuratively. As such, Howard works to blend them into their surroundings, creating a seamless flow in the open, shared living spaces preferred today.

“Kitchens being open to the living space, you want to look in there and be happy. You want it to look like the rest of the space,” she says. “If you’ve got a lot of contrasting colors — even grays and whites — it screams ‘kitchen.'”

Here, Howard shares three of her kitchen designs and what they can teach us.

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“I think the biggest compliment of this kitchen is when you walk in you really have to look for the kitchen. Each piece is like a fine piece of furniture.”

This kitchen, designed for a family of five on Signal Mountain, channels an Old World French vibe.

“You can obviously tell she wants that warm, cozy, lived-in kitchen feel,” says Howard.

But some of the most important details from her rigorous client interview process aren’t necessarily about aesthetics, but whether a family cooks together, who cooks most often, even the height of the most prominent cook. This knowledge helps her determine spacing, placement and flow.

There’s no need for a pantry.

“A lot of people are scared of giving up a walk-in pantry,” Howard says, though she recommends maximizing every square inch by opting for drawers and slide-out cupboards.

Drawers offer seamless storage, both aesthetically and practically.

“You want everything at your hands … [so] anytime you can put a set of drawers instead of cabinets or pulls [I recommend it],” she says, adding, “We know now that, except for a big stockpot, everything can go in a drawer.” Instead, keep those big stockpots in a cabinet above the fridge.

Ceiling-height cabinets are handy, even if they’re not the most accessible.

“A lot of clients had cabinets that did not go to the ceiling,” says Howard. “What’s

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New Vietnamese restaurant is immigrant cook’s dream come true


Meet the family behind Yen’s Kitchen in suburban Lake Worth

Liz Balmaseda
 
| Palm Beach Post

Years before Manh Trac was born in Ho Chi Minh City, his mother performed at the local circus, balancing her petite frame upon spinning barrels. She had terrible motion sickness, but she also had six siblings to help feed. So if it took some daredevil stunts to accomplish that, so be it. 

When that wasn’t enough, Yen Nguyen learned to cook. She set up a lunch stand in an industrial neighborhood and sold steaming bowls of her homemade noodle soups to factory workers on break. Her long-simmered beef pho and pork-broth soups picked up a following. Soon she had a food cart to roll into the local zoo, where she could sell bags of homemade Vietnamese street snacks to visiting families. 

When her son was born, she moved the food enterprise to her front porch. At 25, Manh Trac tells that story as if he witnessed all of it himself, with details so vivid you can taste the chili oil in his mother’s popular spicy beef vermicelli bowls. 

He tells the story today from Yen’s Kitchen, the bright, month-old restaurant his mother opened in a suburban Lake Worth plaza that’s home to three churches, a pizzeria and a new-ish Asian market. Manh may be standing a world away from that front-porch stand of their native Vietnam, but the scents and flavors of their homeland surround him in the small, casual eatery. 

“Everything you see here is made by my mother,” says Manh, referring to the neat shelves of street snacks and spices his mom makes and packages. “We’re just her supporters.”

A hand-painted mural lights up a wall with a sign that translates to “Second Sister of Saigon” — it’s a popular Vietnamese movie title that seems made to order for his mom. Not only is she a second-eldest sister from the city formerly known as Saigon, she’s an industrious woman like the film’s protagonist.  

That’s his mother in the kitchen, ladling 18-hour broth into deep bowls. What you don’t see: The many hours Yen Nguyen spends making the snacks she packages, the desserts displayed in the cooler, the traditional teas she brews, the sandwich meats for her banh mis and the batter for her Vietnamese crepes. 

Manh, who was 8 when his family came to America in 2003 and who holds bachelor’s degrees in business management and communications, handles the operational side of the restaurant while his father Hung Trac and sister Phuong Trac, who helped fund the restaurant startup, help out in the kitchen. Manh is the restaurant manager who sources the ingredients, pays vendors and schedules staff. He does this so his mother can do what she loves to do best: cook. 

Theirs is a quintessential immigrant story in which faraway flavors keep a family grounded and inspired. Yen’s home-cooking nourished the Trac/Nguyen family, body and soul, through several moves in their new country, from Alabama to Tampa to West Palm

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From Ola Food’s big bet on cloud kitchen to Dream Sports’ big IPL leap

What do 10 million Indians like? The answer is cricket. 

Meet FanCode, a multi-sport aggregator platform from the house of Dream Sports (which also runs India’s only gaming unicorn Dream11). FanCode is riding the buzz around IPL 2020. It blends content, commerce, and community to woo the “evolved sports audience.”. Launched in April 2019, it claims to have amassed over one crore users.

FanCode offers match analysis, previews, live streams, and highlights; player trivia, videos, and interviews; fantasy sports research and Dream11 guides; live scores, stats, and schedules; official team merchandise; and match tickets. These are available across multiple sports: cricket, football, basketball, baseball, rugby, and handball.


Watch the video here:


Moving on to the mysterious world of influencer marketing. 

Sumedh Chaphekar founded Mumbai-based startup NOFILTR in 2017 — a social media label that incubates young talent by giving them creative and resourceful direction. It has collaborated with a plethora of influencers and brands, and intends to create a growing community network that facilitates personal expression and intriguing content. 

NOFILTR essentially connects the brand to the influencer, and the influencer to the world at large by offering a wide array of services, which includes personal branding, content creation and curation, influencer marketing and brand collaborations, campaign design along with campaign execution and analysis. 

 “We believe in quality and content, and nurture our talent accordingly. By collaborating with influencers and brands, we intend to create a growing community network that facilitates personal expression and intriguing content,” Sumedh tells YourStory.

NOFILTR

Sumedh Chaphekar I Image credit: NOFILTR

Ride-hailing unicorn Ola launched its food business, Ola Foods, in 2019. With its flagship brand Khichdi Experiment, Ola Foods made a blockbuster entry into the food segment. Pranay Jivrajka, CEO, Ola Foods, says, “Khichdi Experiment is India’s fastest food brand to reach one million orders and one of the fastest-growing categories on all platforms.”

Back in 2017, Ola acquired Foodpanda India for $200 million to enter the online food delivery business. Rumour was that it was taking on Uber — its biggest competitor — that had already launched UberEATS (later acquired by Zomato).

Ola Foods has a network of over 50 tech-enabled smart kitchens and four brands across cities like Chennai, Hyderabad, Bengaluru, Delhi, Mumbai, and Pune. The startup is now focussing on expanding its presence across the country.

Ola Foods

R&D before launching a new brand inside Ola Foods kitchen | Image Source: Ola Foods

In 2013, Ariel Assaraf, Guy Kroupp, Yoni Fariss, and Lior Redlus started Coralogix in Israel and San Francisco as an “anomaly detection platform to run on top of existing logging solutions.” Over time, they learned that they needed to take control over the entire process — from collection and parsing to visualising and alerting — to provide customers with an end-to-end experience.

Coralogix is a log analytics platform that empowers DevOps teams to autonomously manage and analyse log data in cloud applications. The hosted, scaled, and secure ELK stack helps software companies turn cluttered log data into a meaningful set of

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Gran, 57, found dead in garden hot tub after moving to Wales to start dream life closer to her family

A GRAN was found dead in her hot tub after moving to Wales to start her dream life closer to her family.

Shopkeeper Mandy Pugh, 57, had enjoyed spending time in the garden tub with her husband Lee.

Mandy Pugh, pictured second from left, shut up her grocery shop to move 200 miles away with husband Lee before she was found dead in the couple's hot tub

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Mandy Pugh, pictured second from left, shut up her grocery shop to move 200 miles away with husband Lee before she was found dead in the couple’s hot tubCredit: MEDIA WALES
Lee described his wife as "the life and soul of the party" as an inquest into her death opened

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Lee described his wife as “the life and soul of the party” as an inquest into her death openedCredit: Wales News Service
The couple had moved to idyllic Porthcawl in Wales to be closer to family

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The couple had moved to idyllic Porthcawl in Wales to be closer to familyCredit: Getty Images – Getty

But on the night of September 11, he went inside to watch TV.

He returned to discover his wife face-down in the water, an inquest heard today.

A coroner heard hardworking Mandy had recently moved to the seaside town of Porthcawl, South Wales, to be closer to family.

The couple had shut up the grocery shop they ran together in Penmaenmawr, North Wales, to make the 200-mile move.

Mandy was pronounced dead at the scene after the tragedy.

Husband Lee said: “At the start of the year we moved. We closed our shop we had kept as we wanted to be closed to family.

“She was the life and soul of the party.

“She knew loads of people and everyone that knew her loved her. She was always happy.

“Her granddaughter was the apple of her eye.”

No provisional cause of death was given in the post-mortem carried out by pathologist Jason Shannon.

Assistant coroner David Regan adjourned the inquest in Pontypridd, South Wales, until October next year.

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A dream kitchen made easy with banking done right

A dream kitchen made easy with banking done right

First Commonwealth Bank helped this family realize the potential of their home and organize their finances to remodel the kitchen for their growing family.


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it’s important when I’m off is just spending time. Is the family as much as possible in our home A T end of a long day? I just can’t wait to get home and relax and feel comfortable and enjoy the space that we’ve made. Nice E. I’m Laura Tharp and this is my husband, Matt. And we have two Children, Matthew and Noah. I’m a police officer. My wife works at a hospital, so my shift could be inconsistent. She takes call, so we’re constantly coming and going. So we typically get one weekend a month toe be a family without interruption. E was raised with my grandparent’s. We were just taught to be cautious with spending. Both of my parents had toe work to make ends meet. And that’s why saving money was a priority for my dad. That was something that he insulted me from the word go way. Vote our house. We didn’t put what we wanted. We put what we could afford. When my youngest son put some holes in the original floor, we started looking at different floors. We started with wanting to get new hardwoods. Then it was like, Well, if we’re gonna paint like maybe I’d like to get a back splash. I kind of want some crown molding on top of my cabinets. Way met with First Commonwealth Bank to discuss our financial situation when they brought up a home equity loan or a home equity line of credit. It was nice to know that we didn’t have to spend the money if we chose not Thio and we could just use it as emergency fund or, you know, whatever we needed it to be. Eyes. The interest rate they were offering was was low. This helped me to feel comfortable and the fact that my same account wasn’t necessarily going anywhere. But I could still do things to improve my home. The kids really enjoyed seeing the space being transformed. Noah came up to me and said, Oh, I love your new floors, Mom. It brought it all together with the floors and the white kitchen. It just came together really good. First Commonwealth made it really easy. Thio go through the loan process. They told me what documents I needed toe provide and answered all my questions. The process was very straightforward and super easy to get through

A dream kitchen made easy with banking done right

First Commonwealth Bank helped this family realize the potential of their home and organize their finances to remodel the kitchen for their growing family.


First Commonwealth Bank helped this family realize the potential of their home and organize their finances to

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A Canadian Dream House That Took Three Architects to Build

When you build a home from the ground up, there’s one thing that’s more important than the concrete, the lumber, the steel or nearly anything else: patience.

For Jack and Araxi Evrensel, that became abundantly clear when they began start-and-stop work on a house that clings to a steep slope of granite at the edge of Burrard Inlet, in West Vancouver, Canada. By the time the house was completed, they had spent eight years working on it, with three different architects.

The couple tried to take each delay in stride. “We took our time, because we weren’t in any rush,” said Mr. Evrensel, a former restaurateur who sold his five upscale British Columbia restaurants in 2014. Although they were eager to see their dream house built, they were fortunate enough to be able to stay in their old home as long as they needed to, and were focused on getting things right.

“We were very lucky to find this spot,” Mr. Evrensel said. “I loved the idea of the waterfront and that it’s just an outcropping of pure rock.”

The Evrensels, who are in their mid-60s, bought the half-acre lot for about 2.5 million Canadian dollars (roughly $1.9 million) in 2004. To design the house, Mr. Evrensel initially turned to his friend Werner Forster, the architect who had worked on his restaurants.

They got off to a quick start, and construction began in 2005. “He developed it to a point where we started the blasting of the property, since it was all rock,” Mr. Evrensel said.

Shortly after blasting began, however, Mr. Forster became seriously ill and died. With little more than a clearing in the rock completed, Mr. Evrensel put the project on hold. “I wasn’t sure, at the time, I would build it without him,” he said.

Eventually, though, he began thinking about finding another architect. He had long admired the work of Arthur Erickson, one of the most decorated Canadian architects of the era, and had seen him at Mr. Forster’s wake. Although Mr. Erickson had dined in Mr. Evrensel’s restaurants on a few occasions, Mr. Evrensel felt intimidated to ask the architect about his personal project, as Mr. Erickson was known for high-profile buildings like the Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia and the Museum of Glass in Tacoma, Wash.

Nevertheless, he mustered the courage to introduce himself to Mr. Erickson, who was immediately receptive to the idea. They agreed that Mr. Erickson’s former associate, Nick Milkovich, an architect who had handled Mr. Erickson’s residential projects before opening his own studio, would lead the project, with Mr. Erickson serving as a consultant.

“When we first stepped into the project, it was tentative,” Mr. Milkovich said. “Knowing that Jack’s good friend had been working on the house, we wondered how much we could change.”

For months, Mr. Milkovich tentatively floated one small change after another, until Mr. Evrensel made it clear that he wanted his new architects to have full creative freedom. “He said,

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Noelle takes us inside her dream kitchen in Co Cork


Source: Journal Media Studio/YouTube

“WE WANTED TO have a big fridge. We’ve always lived in homes with tiny fridges, so we wanted one with enough space.”

Along with more refrigerator space, another top priority for Noelle Sloane was having a kitchen that could comfortably host guests – something many of us are looking forward to being able to do more freely once current Covid-19 restrictions lift.

“We wanted somewhere that we could host and have family and friends over,” says Noelle, who moved into her self-build home in Ballymacoda, Co Cork with her boyfriend Paul last year. “We wanted the kitchen to be lovely and bright and fresh and still inviting.” 

For me, it was important that we had an island with a hob on it. It makes hosting much easier. You can be involved in conversation while you’re cooking for people.

Screenshot 2020-09-17 at 12.16.36
Noelle Sloane in her dream kitchen, the Hampton


Source: Cash & Carry Kitchens

After seeing and loving a Cash & Carry Kitchens design in someone else’s house, Noelle went to the showroom in Cork city with her wish-list in hand. There she met with kitchen designer Declan Hennessy, who worked to create a space that matched Noelle’s vision.  

“One of Noelle’s main things was to have lots of worktop space, plenty of storage space and easy access to storage,” he says. “There’s a lot of satisfaction to be got from knowing you designed her dream kitchen and that she is very happy with it.”

With the kitchen completed – including the all-important centre island – Noelle says it’s everything she wanted and more. “It’s definitely the heart of our home. It’s where we have the most fun and the most memories in the house already, which is really important to us.”


The Hampton from Cash & Carry Kitchens


Source: Cash & Carry Kitchens

“I just love the way it is when we have people over. That was the most important thing to us from the kitchen,” she says. “It wasn’t so much the kitchen itself, it was what we would be doing in the kitchen and who we would have in the kitchen. I just feel that the layout is absolutely perfect for what we want from it.”

From minor details to installing a built-in extractor fan, Noelle and Declan take us through the process of creating her dream kitchen in this video. 

You can book a free design appointment with Cash & Carry Kitchens today, at any of their 15 nationwide showrooms. With a reputation built on quality, trust and expertise, Cash & Carry Kitchens are with you all the way – from the first conversation, to seeing your new kitchen installed by trained fitters. To start your journey and book a free consultation, visit cashandcarrykitchens.ie or call 1890 92 92 26. 

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Granite And Stone In Kitchen, Doghouse: Bel Air Dream Home

BEL AIR, MD — Tucked away on more than 3 acres of land near Maryland Golf & Country Club, this contemporary home features vaulted ceilings and natural light. Highlights are the gourmet kitchen with wet bar, master suite with private balcony and master bath with walk-in shower and granite vanities. The house could be yours for less than $600,000.

  • Address: 800 St Andrews Way, Bel Air, Maryland
  • Price: $596,100
  • Square Feet: 3974
  • Bedrooms: 5
  • Bathrooms: 3 Full and 1 Half Baths
  • Built: 1980
  • Features: This beautiful custom Lacey Francis home in Bel Air is truly a treasure, and a rare listing you should act on fast. The construction here offers five beds and four baths (three full, one half) across its substantial 3, 976 finished sq ft, and there is a lot to fall in love with in between! The elegant style of this home cannot be understated! The main floor’s unique and semi-open layout situates a number of living spaces among vaulted ceilings and lots of natural light. Upon entering, the most prominent initial space is the open living room and entertainment area, with hardwood floors and great corner light. The central gourmet kitchen is spacious with sleek black granite countertops wrapping around the stone, an exposed chimney of the rear family room, double wall-embedded oven, tile backsplash, a wet bar, and an array of spacious modern cabinets. The family room around the corner from the kitchen has large, semi-skylight windows, with an excellent view of the stream, that extend from the wall to ceiling, new carpeting, and a prominent wood fireplace with floor to ceiling stone masonry. The breakfast area is adjacent to the kitchen and has sliding glass doors that leads to the screened-in deck. While most of the structure’s bedrooms are on the lower floor, this structure’s owner’s suite is on the main level and is a bright and spacious corner room with a luxurious ensuite bath and a private deck overlooking the stream. The enormous owner’s bath has dual granite vanities, a wonderful skylight over the large jacuzzi tub, an over-sized walk-in two-person shower, and a huge walk-in closet! Throughout the lower level of the home, we find pristine carpet and recessed lights, and features a working wood potbelly stove that heats the entire house. Each bedroom is substantial, gets good natural light, and has a dedicated closet. The laundry area is on this floor and comes included with high-efficiency washer and dryer appliances. Additionally, there is a large workroom with a huge storage closet! There are premium outdoor spaces all around the home, in addition to the covered deck by the kitchen, there are two external decks around the home, with one of them being brand new! This home is also dog-ready, with a large indoor-outdoor dog house! Other great features of the home include a brand new water heater and a two-car garage! Living at 800 St Andrews Way, you will be nestled on a quiet, forested private lot, in a beautiful area
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These Kitchen Candles Are a Home Cook’s Dream

Each product we feature has been independently selected and reviewed by our editorial team. If you make a purchase using the links included, we may earn commission.

If you’ve ever attempted to fry or grill anything in a small apartment, you’re familiar with the unsettling feeling of picking up a whiff of last night’s dinner as you toast your bagel the next morning. For anyone working with a less-than-ventilated kitchen space, I recommend investing in a kitchen candle. 

When you love candles as much as I do, you start to justify buying them by assigning each to a specific space or purpose. Bathroom candles must be excellent at masking, well, odors. Bedroom candles are light and crisp, without being too smoky or heady. For kitchen candles, the fragrance shouldn’t be so strong as to create a nauseating combination when mixed with the general smells of food prep and cooking. You’re looking to gently replace odors, not create an entirely new Frankensmell. For this reason, try to avoid overly floral or sweet smells; vegetal, earthy, clean scents are the ticket. Here are a few great choices:

If you’re emotional about the end of tomato season, I’m sorry to say this candle probably isn’t going to do much to assuage your sorrows. However, it will imbue your kitchen with a pleasantly herbaceous, minty scent that will remind you of long walks through the farmer’s market. Of the three candles I describe here, this is the least fragranced, so it’s great for especially tiny spaces (or especially sensitive sniffers). 

Imagine yourself frolicking through an herb garden, snipping peppers and fresh basil with reckless abandon. Ok, now open your eyes. You’re still in your apartment wearing sweatpants coated in crumbs, but you wouldn’t know it if you immersed yourself in this candle. White tea can sometimes smell too sweet, but this perfectly balanced iteration is one you’ll be happy to light on your kitchen countertop to want to wash away the remnants of last night’s meal.

Let’s cut to the chase: this is a splurge candle (and if $85 isn’t a splurge candle to you, perhaps you might consider making a contribution to restaurants impacted by the pandemic). Even the spice it’s named after is spendy, but if you’ve ever wanted your kitchen to smell like a quality spice rack or the Grand Bazaar, this mix of saffron, black peppercorns, and vanilla is the ultimate power play. Plus, it looks great perched on a marble countertop and will last for ages. 

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