NWI Business Ins and Outs: Sophia’s House of Pancakes, Joe’s Downtown Tacos, If Walls Could Talk Home Decor, and BYOB Fitness opening | Northwest Indiana Business Headlines

• BYOB Fitness, whose slogans have included “Build Your Own Body” and “Helping You Build the Best Version of Yourself,” opened in a former video store at 8231 Hohman Avenue in Munster.

The gym offers personal training, group classes, nutritional counseling, boot camps, and pop-up shops. It helps clients who want to build muscle, lose weight, change eating habits or just get coached by a trainer to reach their fitness goals.

Catering to both men and women, it offers certified instructors, full-body workouts, and live classes for all fitness levels. The fitness center offers private training and group classes such as yoga, core and cardio.

A retail section at the fitness center also sells items like tank tops, crew necks, face masks, water bottles and gym bags.

For more information, visit www.buildyourownbodybygina.com.

• Supermercado Durango just opened in Griffith.

The locally owned independent Mexican grocery store is now doing business at 507 E. Glen Park Ave. in a strip mall off 45th Street in Griffith, near the border of Gary’s Black Oak neighborhood. The new store sells fresh groceries and authentic Mexican food. It also runs a taqueria that offers tacos, tortas, sopas, gorditas, burritos and fajitas that are cooked to order.

It took over the space previously owned by Griffith Meats & Catering, a longtime institution that closed for good in 2018.

Supermercado Durango is open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday and from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday.

For more information, call 219-513-9531, email [email protected] or find the business on Facebook.

• Mariner Finance, a personal loan lender, opened in the former Subway restaurant at 9515 Indianapolis Blvd. Suite 1 in the Sir James Court strip mall in Highland.

The financial services company has 450 branches in 24 states. It offers auto loans, personal loans, debt consolidation loans, home loans and other financial services products. The long-time submarine sandwich shop that previously occupied the space shuttered there last year along with Subways in Valparaiso, Michigan City, Hobart and many other Region locations.

• The Alley, the iconic rock, underground and counterculture store that’s a major regional draw from across greater Chicagoland, has closed at the Clark and Belmont intersection in Chicago’s Lakeview neighborhood for the second time in the last few years.

The shop with the landmark skull-and-crossbones logo that sells T-shirts, shoes and leather jackets, has relocated to 2620 W. Fletcher St. in Chicago’s Avondale neighborhood.

A destination for many Region residents over the years, The Alley sells a number of punk, rock, metal, goth, and other youth fashions, including Chicago T-shirts, chain wallets, buttons and more. It’s been a Chicago institution for more than 40 years but has lately transitioned to a more online model of doing business.

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Garden oasis in downtown Omaha grows food and community | Home & Garden

A once-empty plot of land at 13th and Leavenworth Streets is growing food, flowers and community.

Amy Walstrom, who works downtown, has watched the transformation of the Sacred Seed Pop-up Garden on her daily walks. After the Warren Distribution building there was torn down in 2017, the lot has changed from a weedy patch to a haven for pollinators and birds — and people.

“It’s lovely,’’ Walstrom said. “The colors, the variety of plants. The fact that they have labeled what all the different plants are, so if I wanted to duplicate them in my own yard it won’t be so difficult.’’

Janis Regier of Natural Therapy first had the idea for a garden after the Warren building was demolished and approached Polina Schlott, whose husband, Bob, owns the property. The Schlotts liked the idea, with the caveat that the land could someday be sold or developed. Hence the reason it’s called a pop-up garden.

The first year was rough, but then the community started to build. The Nature Conservancy became involved, as did people at Kaneko, the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts and No More Empty Pots. Kinghorn Gardens helped with the layout as well as Taylor Keen, founder of Sacred Seed. Many others have come on board, including Comunidad Maya Pixan Ixim.

The vegetables grown there are feeding multiple pantries, with 1,539 pounds donated so far, and it’s become a learning center for children, teaching them about sustainable gardening and monarch butterflies. Clients at Mosaic get a chance to enjoy nature by helping with the upkeep.

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The Downtown Evening Soup Kitchen

NEW HAVEN, Conn. (WTNH) — When the COVID-19 pandemic first hit, “A lot of angst and fear.” It forced thousands of businesses and non-profits alike all across Connecticut to temporarily shut down. Something that was not put on hold was food insecurity.

“A lot of uncertainty,” said Steve Werlin, Executive Director of The Downtown Evening Soup Kitchen. “Fairly early on in the spring, we actually saw our numbers rise very dramatically.”

The Downtown Evening Soup Kitchen in New Haven and Executive Director Steve Werlin, recognized that the need to help was more important than ever.

“Our mission is to work with the people who are most in need in New Haven so we never really considered shutting down altogether. Life is difficult for them. Life was difficult before covid and life is even more difficult during covid.”

DESK jumped into action and appropriately adjusted the way they serve the city. Rain or shine, tents and tables full of food were set up on site.

“We painted socially distanced footprints.” Said Steve Werlin, Executive Director of The Downtown Evening Soup Kitchen

Volunteers serve as many as 150 people every night.

“We had a moral obligation to continue to stay open.” Said Steve Werlin, Executive Director of The Downtown Evening Soup Kitchen

It’s an organization full of staff and volunteers. Warriors who, amid a pandemic, chose to show up and serve.

“Everyone here is very committed to the mission they understand why what they’re doing is important they understand the need to provide this service to those in need in the community,” said Steve.

On top of their nightly dinners, DESK also has a grocery delivery service and weekly food pantry. Their concern however, is how they will be able to continue to serve outside in the cold.

For more information head to deskct.org.

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Open house brings taste of fall to downtown Lee’s Summit

Many turned out to the annual Fall Open House in downtown Lee’s Summit.

Many turned out to the annual Fall Open House in downtown Lee’s Summit.

Special to the Journal

Orange and red balloons bobbed in the brisk wind along Main Street as people took advantage of fall-like weather in downtown Lee’s Summit last week.

On Sept. 11 and 12, the city hosted its annual Fall Open House. Eighteen local store owners opened their doors — with social-distancing and safety protocols in place.

Julie Cook, events and promotions director for downtown Lee’s Summit, said for more than 20 years, the event has showcased fall decor, cool-weather clothing and fine cuisine.

Cook said she hoped the open house would be a fun reprieve for families hoping to spend time outside, and safely enjoy the shops and eateries.

“There’s plenty of local businesses downtown to grab takeout or curbside pick-up and then picnic at Howard Station Park or City Hall Plaza,” Cook said. “I think right now it is more important than ever to support locally owned businesses.

“When times are tough, it’s helpful to see our dollars change hands within the community.”

One of the local shops, KD’s Books, has been a part of downtown for 27 years. Owner Cheryl Collier said she’s been a lifelong book lover.

“The open houses are always an opportunity to meet new customers, and I think that’s the importance of having a small shop,” Collier said as she straightened her purple-rimmed eyeglasses. “It’s that connection you have to a customer.”

Amid the pandemic, Collier said she was encouraged that so many people were coming out and also following safety guidelines.

“It’s nice because people enjoy getting out in nice weather and doing something that feels normal. This event provides a sense of normalcy,” Collier said.

“We appreciate so much that people are wearing masks and being careful, and we try to do our best to be careful as well,” she said, gesturing to the red social-distancing stickers around her store.

A trio of women, Pat Howard and her daughters, were also enjoying the vibe in Downtown Lee’s Summit as they sat on a bench near The Living Stone, which was showcasing new fall trends.

“We love our downtown. Living Stone is our favorite shop as it’s just a really friendly and fun place to be,” Howard said. “The shops are mostly locally owned (by) residents of Lee’s Summit. We have been in the area for 20 years, so you feel a sense of community out here as you see people you also see at church or in the grocery store.”

Carlo Mancini and his wife also said they were enjoying the atmosphere on Saturday morning.

“It’s a cute, quaint area,” said Mancini as he sipped a spiced chai tea from Whistle Stop Coffee & Mercantile.

“The shops, the restaurants, the people, the service and the weather are all appealing. And it’s a good way to get out, as Downtown Lee’s Summit is really awesome.”

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Free Community Event: LYFE Kitchen Live Music Series in Downtown Evanston

This post was contributed by a community member. The views expressed here are the author’s own.

End August on a high note while enjoying delicious eats and being serenaded by local artists.

Please see below the lineup for LYFE Kitchen’s August music series:

August 21 Carolyn Marcotte: Chicago-based folk artist whose passion for writing songs that reflect both the complete joy and brokenness of our human nature connects with any audience. In addition to her original pieces, Marcotte enjoys adding folky twists to well-known classics (i.e. Michael Jackson, The Beatles) and modern tunes (i.e. Katy Perry, Justin Timberlake).

August 22 Sarah Alysse: Influenced by the wit and lyricism of Ingrid Michaelson and the soulful albums of Alicia Keys, Alysse has created work that stems from her past and creates an alluring sound all her own.

August 28 Petra van Nuis: Jazz singer whose unique and expressive phrasing gives her an instantly identifiable sound that sets her apart from the crowd and provides an intimate view of her emotions.

August 29 Bruce Forbes & Spencer Meyer: This duo brings their fun friendship to the stage each time they perform, providing the audience a unique folk sound and engaging music that keep listeners tapping their feet to the beat of the music.

Guests can enjoy delicious eats such as the Unfried Buffalo Chicken Strips ($6.99) or Roasted Mushroom & Goat Cheese Flatbread ($9.99), while enjoying LYFE Kitchen’s recently launched guilt-free cocktails, all under 200 calories.

The views expressed in this post are the author’s own. Want to post on Patch?

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Interior Health warning of possible COVID-19 exposure at hotel in downtown Kelowna



a train crossing a street in front of a building: Interior Health says a number of people attended a private party at Hotel Zed in Kelowna during the early hours of Monday, Sept. 7.


© Global News
Interior Health says a number of people attended a private party at Hotel Zed in Kelowna during the early hours of Monday, Sept. 7.

Interior Health is warning of a potential coronavirus exposure following a private party at a hotel in downtown Kelowna during the Labour Day weekend.

According to the health agency, a number of people gathered in a common area or on a balcony at Hotel Zed on Abbott Street during the early hours of Monday, Sept. 7.

Interior Health says the people may have been exposed to COVID-19, adding the party is reported to have taken place between midnight and 3:30 a.m.

Read more: B.C. sets another single-day record with 139 new COVID-19 cases

“Interior Health is working closely with the Hotel Zed, but individuals who attended this party may not have been registered guests,” said the health agency.

“Public health officials are asking people who attended this party to self-monitor closely for symptoms of COVID-19 and to get tested if they begin to exhibit symptoms.”

In an interview with Global News, IH medical health officer Dr. Silvina Mema said two people at the party tested positive after the party.

“There was a gathering in the early morning of Sept. 7, and a number of people attended that gathering,” said Mema.

“We are not clear how many people were at that gathering, but after that gathering, we know that two individuals tested positive and were infectious during the gathering.”

Interior Health said contact tracing is underway and, where possible, it is reaching out directly to individuals who have been exposed.

“This potential exposure is a reminder of how important it is to keep gatherings small and to people you know as we head into the fall,” said Interior Health.

It added that people seeking a test should call their primary care provider or the closest Interior Health community testing and assessment centre.

Interior Health says testing is recommended for anyone experiencing symptoms of COVID-19, including:

Fever

Cough

Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing

Loss of sense of taste or smell

It also said other milder symptoms may include runny nose, fatigue, body aches, diarrhea, headache, sore throat, vomiting and red eyes.

Information on public exposures to COVID-19 within the Interior Health region is available here.

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Coronavirus: Interior Health warning of possible COIVD-19 exposure at hotel in downtown Kelowna

Interior Health is warning of a potential coronavirus exposure following a private party at a hotel in downtown Kelowna during the Labour Day weekend.

According to the health agency, a number of people gathered in a common area or on a balcony at Hotel Zed on Abbott Street during the early hours of Monday, Sept. 7.

Interior Health says the people may have been exposed to COVID-19, adding the party is reported to have taken place between midnight and 3:30 a.m.

Read more:
B.C. sets another single-day record with 139 new COVID-19 cases

“Interior Health is working closely with the Hotel Zed, but individuals who attended this party may not have been registered guests,” said the health agency.

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“Public health officials are asking people who attended this party to self-monitor closely for symptoms of COVID-19 and to get tested if they begin to exhibit symptoms.”

Interior Health said contact tracing is underway and, where possible, it is reaching out directly to individuals who have been exposed.






Coronavirus: COVID-19 case numbers, speed of acceleration should both be monitored, Tam says


Coronavirus: COVID-19 case numbers, speed of acceleration should both be monitored, Tam says

“This potential exposure is a reminder of how important it is to keep gatherings small and to people you know as we head into the fall,” said Interior Health.

It added that people seeking a test should call their primary care provider or the closest Interior Health community testing and assessment centre.

Interior Health says testing is recommended for anyone experiencing symptoms of COVID-19, including:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Loss of sense of taste or smell

It also said other milder symptoms may include runny nose, fatigue, body aches, diarrhea, headache, sore throat, vomiting and red eyes.

Story continues below advertisement

Information on public exposures to COVID-19 within the Interior Health region is available here.






Healthcare workers face growing stigma over coronavirus fears


Healthcare workers face growing stigma over coronavirus fears



© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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California Pizza Kitchen closes in downtown SLO after 14 years. Here’s why

California Pizza Kitchen has officially has closed in downtown San Luis Obispo.

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The chain restaurant shut its doors at 876 Marsh St., Suite E, on July 14, according to a company spokesperson.

“Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and related lease challenges with our landlords, we can confirm that we have closed our CPK San Luis Obispo location,” the company said in a statement. “We have loved serving the San Luis Obispo, CA community and thank our guests and business neighbors for their patronage.”

The move to close the San Luis Obispo restaurant came before California Pizza Kitchen announced July 30 that it had filed for voluntary Chapter 11 protection in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of Texas.

“Prior to the filing, CPK closed some restaurants in the United States due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and lease-related challenges with our landlords,” company CEO Jim Hyatt wrote on the company’s website. “We do not have plans to close any additional restaurants at this time.”

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California Pizza Kitchen first opened on Aug. 1, 2006, near Downtown Centre Cinemas. At the time, the restaurant employed 133 employees and seated 185 customers, according to a past Tribune article.

The former home of the restaurant, which spans roughly 6,000 square feet, is part of the San Luis Obispo Collection, a group of commercial buildings totaling 285,200 square feet in San Luis Obispo’s downtown.

The landlord, Jamestown LP, is a multi-billion dollar real estate company based in Atlanta with offices worldwide.

“CPK approached Jamestown for a modification to their lease which we were actively negotiating prior to the brand making the decision to close the store prior to their lease expiration,” said Therese Cron, Jamestown’s vice president of West Coast leasing. “While we’ve enjoyed our partnership with CPK over the past 10 years we are exploring all merchandising options for the 6,000 square-foot space.”

The San Luis Obispo restaurant was part of a national casual dining chain with locations in 32 states, as well as operations worldwide.

California Pizza Kitchen specializes in hand-tossed, hearth-baked pizzas with varieties including barbecue chicken and Thai chicken. The restaurant chain also offers ribeye, salmon, pastas, salads, soups and desserts such as Belgian chocolate souffle cake.

As of Thursday, California Pizza Kitchen signs remained posted at the former location of the San Luis Obispo restaurant, with CPK SLO designs and furniture still inside the commercial building.

———

©2020 The Tribune (San Luis Obispo, Calif.)

Visit The Tribune (San Luis Obispo, Calif.) at www.sanluisobispo.com

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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SLO CA restaurant California Pizza Kitchen closes downtown

California Pizza Kitchen has officially has closed in downtown San Luis Obispo.

The chain restaurant shut its doors at 876 Marsh St., Suite E, on July 14, according to a company spokesperson.

“Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and related lease challenges with our landlords, we can confirm that we have closed our CPK San Luis Obispo location,” the company said in a statement. “We have loved serving the San Luis Obispo, CA community and thank our guests and business neighbors for their patronage.”

The move to close the San Luis Obispo restaurant came before California Pizza Kitchen announced July 30 that it had filed for voluntary Chapter 11 protection in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of Texas.

“Prior to the filing, CPK closed some restaurants in the United States due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and lease-related challenges with our landlords,” company CEO Jim Hyatt wrote on the company’s website. “We do not have plans to close any additional restaurants at this time.”

California Pizza Kitchen first opened on Aug. 1, 2006, near Downtown Centre Cinemas. At the time, the restaurant employed 133 employees and seated 185 customers, according to a past Tribune article.

The former home of the restaurant, which spans roughly 6,000 square feet, is part of the San Luis Obispo Collection, a group of commercial buildings totaling 285,200 square feet in San Luis Obispo’s downtown.

0608010035.JPG
Douglas Beima puts out table cards at the California Pizza Kitchen in San Luis Obispo’s Downtown Centre before the restaurant’s opening in 2006. The restaurant moved into a space formerly occupied by Fresh Choice. David Middlecamp

The landlord, Jamestown LP, is a multi-billion dollar real estate company based in Atlanta with offices worldwide.

“CPK approached Jamestown for a modification to their lease which we were actively negotiating prior to the brand making the decision to close the store prior to their lease expiration,” said Therese Cron, Jamestown’s vice president of West Coast leasing. “While we’ve enjoyed our partnership with CPK over the past 10 years we are exploring all merchandising options for the 6,000 square-foot space.”

The San Luis Obispo restaurant was part of a national casual dining chain with locations in 32 states, as well as operations worldwide.

California Pizza Kitchen specializes in hand-tossed, hearth-baked pizzas with varieties including barbecue chicken and Thai chicken. The restaurant chain also offers ribeye, salmon, pastas, salads, soups and desserts such as Belgian chocolate souffle cake.

As of Thursday, California Pizza Kitchen signs remained posted at the former location of the San Luis Obispo restaurant, with CPK SLO designs and furniture still inside the commercial building.

Related stories from San Luis Obispo Tribune

Nick Wilson covers the city of San Luis Obispo and has been a reporter at The Tribune in San Luis Obispo since 2004. He also writes regularly about K-12 education, Cal Poly, Morro Bay and Los Osos. He is a graduate of UC Santa Barbara and UC Berkeley and is originally from Ojai.

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Comings & Goings: Ronit’s Kitchen in downtown Rockford to close – Business – Rockford Register Star

ROCKFORD — A downtown restaurant that features Mediterranean cuisine and celebrated its one-year anniversary in June will close Sept. 30.

“COVID-19 has another casualty,” owner Ronit Golan said in a post Thursday on the Facebook page for Ronit’s Kitchen, which is located inside Indoor City Market, 116 N. Madison St., and serves foods such as homemade falafel, chicken schwarma and schnitzel.

“Roni and I tried to keep our doors open and serve the public the best we could during this unprecedented time,” she said, referring to her husband, Roni Golan, who operates a downtown art studio.

Restaurants and other businesses were shut down in March in Illinois to prevent spread of COVID-19, the respiratory disease caused by the coronavirus, and were allowed to reopen in May for outdoor dining. Inside dining was later allowed with restrictions on the number of customers. The disease spreads through droplets caused by sneezing, coughing or talking.

Other downtown eateries have closed as a result of the pandemic, including Stewart Square Eatery and Kuma’s Asian Bistro. Social Urban Bar & Restaurant is no longer open for dining but hosts private events.

“I hope that in the near future after the dust from the closing settles we will keep serving you,” Ronit Golan said. She said she hopes to offer catering in the future.

Golan is encouraging customers to order food at the restaurant in the coming weeks. “Now is the right time to show us your support as we were hit very hard financially,” she said.

Georgette Braun: [email protected]; @GeorgetteBraun

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