Trump says he no longer has COVID-19, doesn’t say if he tested negative

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The Commission on Presidential Debates cancels the second presidential debate planned for Miami, following President Trump’s refusal to take part in a virtual format.

USA TODAY

WASHINGTON – President Donald Trump claimed Sunday he no longer has COVID-19 even though the White House refuses to say whether he has tested negative for the disease.

Just hours after his physician issued a memo saying he is no longer “a transmission risk” to others, Trump said in an interview on Fox News that he no longer has the disease and suggested he is now immune to the coronavirus.

Trump did not say in that interview whether he has tested negative for COVID-19. The memo issued late Saturday by his physician, Dr. Sean Conley, didn’t address that issue either. 

Later Sunday, in an audio message to supporters, Trump claimed he has tested “totally negative” for COVID-19, going beyond the public memos released from his doctors.

Trump, who was hospitalized for three days last week at Walter Reed Military Medical Center for treatment for COVID-19, said during a telephone interview with Fox News’ “Sunday Morning Futures” that he feels great and that he is not taking any medications for the disease.

“The president is in very good shape,” he said.

‘I’m feeling great’: Trump delivers White House remarks in first public event since testing positive for COVID-19

Trump suggested he is now immune from the coronavirus and that he has “a protective glow” from the virus that has killed nearly 215,000 Americans.

Medical experts say people who get COVID-19 generally develop antibodies that might protect them from a second infection, although there’s no guarantee of how long that protection might last or whether it’s completely effective.

“It looks like I’m immune for, I don’t know, maybe a long time and maybe a short time,” Trump said.

Later Sunday, Trump made a similar statement on Twitter, causing the social media platform to attach a warning to the post. 

“A total and complete sign off from White House Doctors yesterday,” Trump wrote. “That means I can’t get it (immune), and can’t give it. Very nice to know!!!”

Twitter said the post violated its rules about “spreading misleading and potentially harmful information” related to COVID-19. But Twitter did not remove the post, saying it may be in the public’s interest for the tweet to remain accessible.

Trump announced Oct. 2 that he and first lady Melania Trump tested positive for COVID-19. Since then, an array of White House officials and top Republicans have also tested positive, several who were in attendance at a Sept. 26 Rose Garden announcement of Trump’s Supreme Court pick. That gathering has since been

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Trump says he no longer has COVID, doesn’t say if he tested negative

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US President Donald Trump on Saturday said he was “feeling great” as he made his first public appearance since returning to the White House after being treated for the coronavirus. (Oct. 10)

AP Domestic

WASHINGTON – President Donald Trump claimed Sunday he no longer has COVID-19 even though the White House refuses to say whether he has tested negative for the disease.

Just hours after his physician issued a memo saying he is no longer “a transmission risk” to others, Trump said in an interview on Fox News that he no longer has the disease and suggested he is now immune to the coronavirus.

Trump did not say in the interview whether he has tested negative for COVID-19. The memo issued late Saturday by his physician, Dr. Sean Conley, didn’t address that issue either.

Trump, who was hospitalized for three days last week at Walter Reed Military Medical Center for treatment for COVID, said during a telephone interview with Fox News’ Sunday Morning Futures that he feels great and that he is not taking any medications for the disease.

“The president is in very good shape,” he said.

‘I’m feeling great’: Trump delivers White House remarks in first public event since testing positive for COVID-19

President Donald Trump leaves the White House for Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after testing positive for COVID-19. (Photo: Drew Angerer, Getty Images)

Trump suggested he is now immune from the coronavirus and that he has “a protective glow” from the virus that has killed nearly 215,000 Americans.

Medical experts say people who get COVID can develop antibodies that might protect them from a second infection, although there’s no guarantee how long that protection might last or whether it’s completely effective.

“It looks like I’m immune for, I don’t know, maybe a long time and maybe a short time,” Trump said.

Trump announced Oct. 2 that he and first lady Melania Trump tested positive for COVID-19. Since then, an array of White House officials and top Republicans have also tested positive, several who were in attendance at a Sept. 26 Rose Garden announcement of Trump’s Supreme Court pick. That gathering has since been deemed a “superspreader” event.

Conley wrote in his memo on Saturday that Trump is no longer considered “a transmission risk” to others because 10 days have passed since the start of his bout with COVID. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines say someone who tested positive should remain isolated until 10 days have passed since the onset of their symptoms.

“Moving forward, I will continue to monitor him clinically as he returns to an active schedule,” Conley wrote.

The White House has refused to reveal the last time Trump tested negative for coronavirus.Trump spokesman Brian Morgenstern dodged the question six times during an appearance Friday on MSNBC. 

Super spreader events: How do they cause COVID-19 outbreaks and is the White House now a hot spot?

Conley released his memo just hours after Trump held a campaign-style rally at the

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Donald Trump Is Taking Remdesivir, Doesn’t Need Supplemental Oxygen, White House Says

Late Friday evening, the White House announced that President Donald Trump did not need supplemental oxygen, and had started taking Remdesivir for his COVID-19.



a man standing in front of a building: President Donald Trump, shown here leaving the White House for Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, is beginning Remdesivir therapy.


© Drew Angerer/Getty
President Donald Trump, shown here leaving the White House for Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, is beginning Remdesivir therapy.

The White House released a statement from official presidential physician, Dr. Sean P. Conley at 11:34 p.m. on Twitter from the account of press secretary Kayleigh McEnany.

“This afternoon, in consultation with specialists from Walter Reed and Johns Hopkins University, I recommended movement of the President up to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center for further monitoring. This evening I am happy to report that the President is doing very well. He is not requiring supplemental oxygen, but in consultation with specialists we have elected to initiate Remdesivir therapy. He has completed his first dose and is resting comfortably,” Conley wrote.

World Reacts To Donald Trump, First Lady Melania Testing Positive For Coronavirus

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Trump himself tweeted shortly before, at 11:31 p.m., in his second tweet since his diagnosis.

“Going welI, I think! Thank you to all. LOVE!!!” the president wrote.

Trump’s other tweet Friday evening, posted at 6:31 p.m., was to announce that he was being admitted to Walter Reed in an 18-second video.

“I want to thank everybody for the tremendous support,” Trump said in the video. “I’m going to Walter Reed hospital. I think I’m doing very well but we’re going to make sure that things work out. The first lady is doing very well.”

“So thank you I appreciate it, I will never forget it,” he added.

Newsweek reached out to the White House for comment.

According to the White House, Trump has only shown mild symptoms, including fatigue and fever. Donald J. Trump Jr. told Tucker Carlson on Fox News Friday evening that the president had been taken to Walter Reed out of an “abundance of caution.”

In addition to the Remdesivir, Trump is being given an experimental antibody treatment from Regeneron. The treatment is called REGN-COV2, and though it is still in clinical trials, the drug is being is being administered to the president under the “compassionate use” provision of the Food and Drug Administration’s guidelines.

Conley said earlier Friday that Trump was also being given zinc, vitamin D, the acid reflux drug famotidine, sleep aid melatonin and aspirin.

In addition to Trump, first lady Melania Trump, former White House counselor Kellyanne Conway, North Carolina Senator Thom Tillis and Utah Senator Mike Lee have also tested positive for the coronavirus. White House aide Hope Hicks was the first to test positive for COVID-19 this week. All attended Saturday’s nomination ceremony for Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court.

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White House doctor says Trump is feeling ‘well’ after COVID-19 diagnosis, but doesn’t disclose whether he has symptoms



a close up of a man with a beard looking at the camera: The Trump White House has undermined government data for years, through intent and incompetence. Getty


© Getty
The Trump White House has undermined government data for years, through intent and incompetence. Getty

  • White House Physician Sean Conley released a memo early Friday morning confirming President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump tested positive for COVID-19, but he did not specify whether the president is symptomatic.
  • “Rest assured I expect the President to continue carrying out his duties without disruption while recovering, and I will keep you updated on any further developments,” Conley wrote.
  • Under the 25th amendment, the president has to submit a “written declaration that he is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office” to transfer power to the vice president.
  • Hope Hicks, the senior White House aide who tested positive for the virus yesterday, is symptomatic, according to CNN and multiple news outlets.
  • Several of the president’s upcoming events were removed from his White House schedule for Friday after Trump broke the news he had COVID, and First Lady Melania Trump tweeted that she has “postponed all upcoming engagements.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A memorandum from White House Physician Sean Conley released early Friday morning described President Donald Trump as feeling “well” following his positive test result for COVID-19, but it did not specify whether the president is symptomatic.

“Rest assured I expect the President to continue carrying out his duties without disruption while recovering, and I will keep you updated on any further developments,” Conley wrote.

Conley also confirmed that the 74-year old president and First Lady Melania Trump are quarantining.

“The President and First Lady are both well at this time, and they plan to remain at home within the White House during their convalescence,” Conley wrote.

Several of Trump’s upcoming events for Friday were also removed from his schedule, with the White House releasing an updated version shortly after his tweet announcing the positive test result. Gone from the president’s calendar is a morning intelligence briefing, a trip to his Washington DC hotel for a roundtable with supporters and a later afternoon campaign trip to Sanford, Florida.

Trump, however, still does have a scheduled phone call at 12:15 pm to discuss COVID-19 with vulnerable seniors.

Melania Trump also tweeted that her upcoming events will be postponed.

 

Under the 25th Amendment, Trump would transfer power over to Vice President Mike Pence if he were incapacitated or unable to perform his duties as president.

“Whenever the President transmits to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives his written declaration that he is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office, and until he transmits to them a written declaration to the contrary, such powers and duties shall be discharged by the Vice President as Acting President,” Section III of the amendment reads.

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A top House Republican criticized the $400 weekly federal unemployment benefit in the White House stimulus plan, saying the GOP doesn’t want ‘wasteful spending’



Kevin Brady wearing a suit and tie: Republican Rep. Kevin Brady of Texas on Capitol Hill. Andrew Harnik/AP Photo


© Andrew Harnik/AP Photo
Republican Rep. Kevin Brady of Texas on Capitol Hill. Andrew Harnik/AP Photo

  • Rep, Kevin Brady criticized elements of the White House plan, including a $400 federal unemployment benefit.
  • “The worry is: ‘How much wasteful spending will we have to swallow to do this?” Brady said in a Fox Business interview.
  • Brady, the top Republican on the House Ways & Means Committee, expressed concern that a $400 federal unemployment benefit disincentivizes work.
  • Numerous studies indicate an earlier $600 federal benefit didn’t keep people out of the labor force.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Rep. Kevin Brady of Texas — the ranking Republican on the tax-writing House Ways and Means Committee — was critical of elements within the White House’s stimulus proposal on Thursday, including a $400 weekly federal unemployment benefit.

During an interview with Fox Business, Brady said many Republicans are reluctant to back a stimulus plan with a big price tag.

“The worry is: ‘How much wasteful spending will we have to swallow to do this?” Brady said, adding he wanted the federal government to prioritize spending on thwarting the coronavirus and aiding the jobless.

But he expressed concern that a $400 federal supplement to state unemployment checks would disincentivize people from seeking work, arguing many would earn more out of work than on the job as a result.

It’s a claim often made by Republicans about the economic impact of the $600 federal unemployment benefit that expired in late July. Numerous studies show it didn’t keep jobless people out of the workforce.

Brady said “targeted help” was needed, particularly to airlines moving ahead with layoffs and the restaurant industry.

Read more: BlackRock’s investment chief breaks down why Congress passing a second round of fiscal stimulus is ‘quite serious’ for markets and the economy — and pinpoints which sectors will benefit in either scenario

House Democrats led by Speaker Nancy Pelosi are pressing for a $2.2 trillion stimulus plan. It includes a $600 weekly federal unemployment benefit, another wave of $1,200 stimulus checks, and aid to cash-strapped states and small businesses.

Meanwhile, the White House put forward a $1.6 trillion virus aid proposal containing many of the same measures, but lower spending amounts.

Brady’s remarks underscore the opposition to significant federal spending among GOP lawmakers. Many in the GOP say they’re opposed to stimulus plans since it would grow the federal debt. Lawmakers have approved over $3 trillion in federal aid since the pandemic began devastating the economy in the spring.

Negotiations between Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and Pelosi stretched into their fifth day on Thursday. The California Democrat assailed the White House’s proposal in a Bloomberg TV interview.

“This isn’t half a loaf. What they’re offering is the heel of the loaf… and you really can’t just say, well, just take this,” she said.

Read more: Stimulus talks press on as dealmakers push for another boost to unemployment payments. Here’s everything you need to know about the rescue package.

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Trump offshore drilling ban doesn’t stop NC seismic testing

U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt said there is very little chance of seismic testing moving forward off of the N.C. coast while offshore drilling moratoriums are in place. This photo shows Platform Holly, an oil drilling rig in the Santa Barbara Channel offshore of the city of Goleta, California.

U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt said there is very little chance of seismic testing moving forward off of the N.C. coast while offshore drilling moratoriums are in place. This photo shows Platform Holly, an oil drilling rig in the Santa Barbara Channel offshore of the city of Goleta, California.

AP

Although President Donald Trump has expanded an offshore drilling moratorium to federal waters off North Carolina, conservation groups are concerned coastal environments could still be endangered by seismic testing.

The U.S. Department of Justice said in a court filing last week that moratoriums against drilling off of North Carolina and other Southeastern states do not prevent companies from conducting seismic testing, a method of mapping oil and natural gas deposits under the ocean floor by blasting loud noises from an array of air guns.. But in an interview with the News & Observer, U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt said he thinks the moratorium means there is “like zero” chance seismic testing will happen off of the North Carolina coast.

“The president’s action means that it’s extraordinarily unlikely, in my opinion, that there will ever be seismic done in these areas because the entire point of doing it for these companies — in order to want to sell it — is gone,” Bernhardt said.

Environmental groups disagree. Kristen Monsell, a spokeswoman for the Center for Biological Diversity Action Fund, said that even though the Atlantic seaboard was never opened to offshore drilling in the 2010s, several companies still submitted seismic testing applications to the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management.

“I think that shows that oil and seismic companies will try to get into areas regardless of what’s open to leasing to do seismic to see what’s out there, and if they can find something, then push to have it open,” Monsell said.

The Center for Biological Diversity is one of many plaintiffs in a federal lawsuit filed in South Carolina trying to block the permitting of seismic testing, a lawsuit joined by N.C. Attorney General Josh Stein. The Department of Justice memo regarding seismic testing and the moratoriums was in response to that lawsuit.

Four companies have outstanding applications and incidental harm authorizations, allowing them to kill or ham wildlife as a side effect of the seismic activity. Another company, WesternGeco, withdrew its application earlier this year.

In a letter to N.C. Department of Environmental Quality officials, WesternGeco said its testing would have included blasting during roughly 208 days over a yearlong period, with sounds ranging from 225 to 260 decibels.

Oceana, an ocean conservancy group, is also a plaintiff in the South Carolina lawsuit. Diane Hoskins, a spokeswoman for Oceana’s advocacy partner, Oceana Action, said the moratorium’s protections do not go far enough.

“If the four companies pull their applications, that would be the level of certainty our coastal economies deserve,” Hoskins said, later adding, “This an investment in the future of offshore drilling that our states and coastal economies don’t want.”

North Carolina environmental

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Minister doesn’t know whether it’s legal to meet a friend in a pub garden in locked down North East England

A MINISTER caused confusion this morning after she was unable to say if new laws banning people from meeting friends from different households would apply outside.

In a chaotic interview today Gillian Keegan said she didn’t know whether people were still allowed to meet up with others outside from tomorrow, when the locked down North East faces an even tougher crackdown.

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Gillian Keegan today couldn't confirm whether the fines will apply to pub gardens

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Gillian Keegan today couldn’t confirm whether the fines will apply to pub gardens

Parts of the North East of England including Sunderland, Durham, Newcastle and Northumberland will be outlawed from popping around to visit a friend for a cup of tea, or seeing their parents for lunch out in any public setting, Matt Hancock said yesterday.

As The Sun exclusively revealed, it means they will face fines for breaking the rules, and possibly get a criminal record.

But Ms Keegan was today unable to say whether friends could meet up in a pub garden, or other outdoor settings such as a park.

She told Radio 4’s Today programme: “Sorry I can’t answer that question, I don’t represent the North East… I didn’t want to make a mistake”.

The Chicester MP said: “I’m sorry, I can’t clarify that.

“I just don’t have the details of those seven areas.”

The Department of Health confirmed to The Sun today that people will only face fines if they meet with others in indoor settings.

The North East’s guidance says that people should not socialise with people they don’t live with in any public space – meaning pubs, restaurants, cafes, shops or elsewhere.

The household mixing rules will be put into law as of 00.01 tomorrow.

The level of fines is not yet clear.

 

People in the North East will be fined for visiting others in their own homes, Matt Hancock reveals

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No, the White House Rose Garden Doesn’t Spell Out ‘KKK’

In late August 2020, Snopes readers inquired about an edited photograph circulating on Facebook that depicted the newly renovated White House Rose Garden with red-tinted hedges seemingly arranged in the shape of the letters “KKK.”

“BTW (by the way), the new Rose Garden spells out ‘KKK,’” the meme reads.


The reference to the “new” Rose Garden in the meme comes from the fact that first lady Melania Trump announced on Aug. 22, 2020, that she had overseen a renovation of the Rose Garden that had resulted in some significant changes, including the removal of crab apple trees and a less lively color palette than before.

The unveiling of the garden’s new appearance led to some strong opinions, along with misleading claims that Trump had “dug up” the garden installed by Jackie Kennedy.

The Rose Garden’s boxwood hedges run in a diamond shape, a design that precedes the most recent renovation and even the Trumps themselves. Here’s an unaltered image, which was posted by Melania Trump, in which the hedges can be seen. Anyone with an image editing app can trace any number of shapes (or letters, including “KKK”) over the hedges to send a false message.

But the fact remains that the hedges in that configuration have been there for decades, dating back to the Kennedy administration. Rachel Lambert “Bunny” Mellon, the horticulturalist who designed the garden on behalf of U.S. President John F. Kennedy, recounted that the hedges were indeed installed in a diamond shape:

A large diamond-shaped outline of santolina would surround each crab-apple tree. Each diamond would be set in a larger outline: a small clipped English boxwood hedge and, next to the lawn, a low growing hybrid boxwood called Greenpillow, developed by Henry Hohman in Kingsville, Maryland.

The same hedges, in the diamond configuration, can be seen in this 2015 image of U.S. President Donald Trump’s predecessor, President Barack Obama, walking in the Rose Garden.

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House Democrats ask appeals court to review ruling that McGahn doesn’t have to testify

House Democrats asked a larger panel of judges on a powerful Washington, DC-based appeals court on Tuesday to review whether former White House counsel Donald McGahn must appear before a congressional committee and testify about President Donald Trump.



Don McGahn looking at the camera: White House counsel Donald McGahn at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Thursday, September 27, 2018 on Capitol Hill.


© Melina Mara-Pool/Getty Images
White House counsel Donald McGahn at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Thursday, September 27, 2018 on Capitol Hill.

The filing is the latest chapter in a significant separation of powers dispute concerning whether federal courts can enforce legislative subpoenas against executive-branch officials.

Late last month, a three judge panel of the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit ruled that the House’s lawsuit against McGahn must be dismissed. The court reasoned that Congress had to enact law expressly authorizing such a suit before it can go forward.

Now the House wants the full court to review the opinion.

In the new filing, House general counsel Douglas Letter argued that the opinion by the three judge panel “hamstrung the House’s constitutional right to obtain information.”

Letter said it was time for the full court “to resolve this matter so that the House can finally act upon its subpoena and obtain the information it requires to carry out its constitutional responsibilities.”

The House Judiciary Committee has been trying to interview McGahn under oath since spring 2019, and Democrats say they want to question him about potentially obstructive behavior from the President during the Russia investigation, which McGahn witnessed and had disclosed to special counsel Robert Mueller.

But the case has ping ponged between a three judge panel of the court, and the full panel of judges. Previously, the same split panel of three judges said the House didn’t have the ability to take the executive branch to court over a subpoena. But then the full appeals court disagreed, sending the case back to the same three judges.

The Justice Department, representing Trump and his Cabinet, had argued the courts should stay out of the disputes, letting Congress use politics and legislation to force the administration into compliance if it must.



Don McGahn wearing a suit and tie


© Drew Angerer/Getty Images


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