George Hallenbeck For CT House District 146

STAMFORD, CT — The 2020 election is heating up in Connecticut and there are plenty of races with candidates eager to serve in elected office. Eyes are primarily focused on the presidential election, but every state representative and senate seat is up for grabs. All five of Connecticut’s congressional seats are up for grabs as well.

There are 151 seats in the state House of Representatives and 36 in the state Senate. Democrats currently hold majorities in both chambers with a 91 to 60 lead over Republicans in the House and a 22 to 14 lead in the Senate.

Connecticut Patch asked candidates to answer questions about their campaigns and will be publishing candidate profiles as election day draws near.

George Hallenbeck, a Stamford resident, is running for House of Representatives District 146.

Age: 78

Party affiliation: Republican Party

Family: Married, with one son married and living in Texas.

Occupation: Retired Telecommunications Manager, Volunteer Boating Teacher for over 40 years

Previous elected experience: National Rear Commander USPS, local Past Commander

Family members in government: No

Campaign website: [email protected]

The single most pressing issue facing our state is _______, and this is what I intend to do about it.

Getting state finances back on track without increasing taxes with responsible spending.

What are the critical differences between you and the other candidates seeking this post?

Have owned a small business in CT and I know the challenges we face in CT. Lifelong volunteer boating teacher and community volunteer.

What accomplishments in your past would you cite as evidence you can handle this job?

Besides owning my own company and ran a 250-person volunteer organization,

Do you believe Connecticut needs reform when it comes to electric utility oversight? What steps, if any should be taken?

Yes, I support the governors recently passed utility oversight bill. Would like to see this taken one step further with competition.

What steps should state government take to bolster economic recovery from the coronavirus pandemic for local businesses?

Follow the CDC guidelines and open as much as possible with only selective restrictions.

List other issues that define your campaign platform:

What else would you like voters to know about yourself and your positions?

Part of the Republican team seeking to rebuild Connecticut.

This article originally appeared on the Stamford Patch

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Editorial: We recommend Valoree Swanson for Texas House District 150

It still boggles the mind that Rep. Valoree Swanson won her seat in Texas House District 150 in 2016 by running to the right of its long-time occupant, fellow Republican Debbie Riddle, who had burnished her conservative credentials by warning about “terror babies” on national TV and argued free education was straight from the “pit of hell.”

Swanson, a longtime political activist and darling of the unscrupulous right-wing lobby group Empower Texas, didn’t pass a single bill her first session despite a long list filed, including efforts to outlaw abortion, which has been legal since 1973, shorten the early voting period, require fetal death certificates after abortions, make English the official language of Texas and our personal favorite: tax people who buy newspapers.

Her second session was better, though. She authored some bills seemingly outside Empower founder Michael Quinn Sullivan’s bucket list. They included legislation on disaster preparation, school safety and one that seems far-fetched but has become law in well over a dozen other states: declaring pornography a public health hazard, which even drew Democratic support. More than a dozen bills she sponsored and co-sponsored became law.

Swanson, 63, also worked across the aisle to help fend off right-wing opposition to a bill that helped the City of Houston expand affordable housing in multifamily units within city limits.

Swanson didn’t meet with the editorial board. We’re hopeful about signs that she may be maturing and branching out as a lawmaker. Still, her extreme views fueled by her activist focus hamper her effectiveness in the House as a whole. And in June she made headlines for pushing back on Gov. Greg Abbott’s COVID-19 contact tracing program, arguing in part “the threat was wildly exaggerated.”

So, we were eager to hear from her challenger.

Michael Robert Walsh is earnest, informed and his priorities would resonate with many Texans, such as abolishing Confederate Heroes Day, adequately funding schools, legalizing marijuana and boosting the minimum wage to $10 an hour.

Unfortunately, Walsh has no experience in public office, he is 22, a student at Sam Houston State University and has raised $724, according to an Oct. 5 campaign finance report, while Swanson reported $8,960. The fact that Swanson bested a more experienced Democrat in 2018 with 58 percent of the vote tells us Swanson’s views are likely more in step with the Spring-area district than Walsh’s.

A Libertarian candidate Jesse Herrera didn’t meet with us. His website does not articulate a clear vision for the office.

We hope to hear more from Walsh in the future, but for now we recommend voters stick with Swanson.

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Caroline Simmons For CT House District 144

STAMFORD, CT — The 2020 election is heating up in Connecticut and there are plenty of races with candidates eager to serve in elected office. Eyes are primarily focused on the presidential election, but every state representative and senate seat is up for grabs. All five of Connecticut’s congressional seats are up for grabs as well.

There are 151 seats in the state House of Representatives and 36 in the state Senate. Democrats currently hold majorities in both chambers with a 91 to 60 lead over Republicans in the House and a 22 to 14 lead in the Senate.

Connecticut Patch asked candidates to answer questions about their campaigns and will be publishing candidate profiles as election day draws near.

Caroline Simmons, a Stamford resident, is running for House of Representatives District 144.

Age: 34

Party affiliation: Democratic Party

Family: Husband: Art Linares (former State Senator from the 33rd District), Kids: Teddy (23 months) and Jack (6 weeks)

Occupation: State Representative (6 years), and Senior Specialist for Policy Innovation and Impact at Elevate: A Policy Lab to Elevate Mental Health and Disrupt Poverty, Yale School of Medicine

Previous elected experience: State Representative

Family members in government: Husband: Art Linares (former State Senator, 33rd District): Brother: Nick Simmons (Director of Special Projects in Governor Lamont’s Office); Father: Steve Simmons (Former Governor on the Broadcasting Board of Governors, which oversees Voice of America, Radio Free Europe, and Radio Free Asia )

Campaign website: www.carolinesimmons.org

The single most pressing issue facing our state is _______, and this is what I intend to do about it.

COVID-19. I will work tirelessly to help Connecticut overcome the health and economic challenges of COVID-19, by working to expand and enhance testing, access to PPE, expanding job training and employment opportunities, supporting our teachers, students and schools with funding and technology support, expanding access to affordable child care, providing small businesses with access to capital, and helping our economy continue to safely reopen.

What accomplishments in your past would you cite as evidence you can handle this job?

Have served as State Representative since 2014 and honored to Co-Chair the Commerce Committee and have introduced and help pass numerous bills; work at the Yale School of Medicine on maternal mental health policies at Elevate: A Policy Lab to Elevate Mental Health and Disrupt Poverty; used to work as a Program Specialist at the Women’s Business Development Council; worked at the U.S. Department of Homeland Security for four years in counterterrorism; have a BA in Government from Harvard and an MA in Middle East Studies from George Washington University.

Do you believe Connecticut needs reform when it comes to electric utility oversight? What steps, if any should be taken?

Yes. Was proud to support the Take Back Our Grid bill that aims to better protect ratepayers by establishing performance based ratemaking, requiring utilities provide credits to customers when they are without power for more than 96 hours, connecting the portion of executive salaries that come from

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Editorial: We recommend Penny Morales Shaw for Texas House District 148

Texans often struggle to name their representatives, but House District 148 voters have an excuse. Counting primaries and runoffs, this is their fifth election in a year to replace longtime state Rep. Jessica Farrar.

Penny Morales Shaw finally emerged from a crowded field of Democrats after Farrar endorsed her over Anna Eastman, who was elected briefly in January in a special election runoff to finish out Farrar’s term.

Republican Luis LaRotta ran unopposed in the primary.

One thing voters can be clear about is whoever wins has worked long and hard to represent them.

We believe Morales Shaw’s work as a private practice attorney, life experience, deep ties to the area and history of advocacy make her the best fit for this diverse north and northwest Houston district that could sure use a champion in Austin.

The kind of multi-tasking involved in legislative service, from responding to constituent needs to shepherding legislation through the process, is something Shaw came by honestly, and tragically.

She went to law school intending to go into international human rights law and public policy. But her husband died the year she took the bar exam in 2000, leaving her a single mom raising four kids. She built a bread-and-butter practice that allowed her to balance career and family.

She says she still made time for advocacy, volunteering in the NAACP’s free legal clinics and working with the international not-for-profit organization CARE to improve maternal health, access to microloans and necessities such as clean water in countries across South America and Africa. She also advocated for the International Violence Against Women Act.

“People can say anything about what they will do and what they care about,” says Morales Shaw, “but I think it’s important to see what someone’s life story is, what they’ve endured, what their fortitude is and what their work has been.”

Refreshingly, both candidates seem less bound by partisan identities and willing to work across the aisle.

“We’re so far cornered in our tribe,” says LaRotta, a 40-year-old Navy veteran and real estate investor. “We’re afraid to evaluate our positions and challenge our biases.”

But LaRotta isn’t. He says he began opposing the death penalty after looking at evidence showing a likelihood that Texas has executed innocent people. He favors police accountability, decriminalizing cannabis but also repealing the franchise tax.

We admire his independence, but some stances, such as opposing Medicaid expansion, are at odds with the needs of the district. Voters should send Morales Shaw to Austin.

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Jaimie Lynn Kulikowski, U.S. House District 6

The 2020 election is heating up in Colorado and there are plenty of races with candidates eager to serve in elected office. Eyes are primarily focused on the presidential election, but voters will also decide the outcome of state representative, senate and judicial seats.

Patch asked candidates to answer questions about their campaigns and will be publishing candidate profiles as election day draws near.

Jaimie Lynn Kulikowski is running for U.S. House – District 6.

Age: 43
Party affiliation: Unity Party
Family: The video below shares a little of my backstory to include photos of my family. I am the oldest of three girls. My parents, Tom Kulikowski and Franny Weitzel-Calhan, were very young when they had me, both 19 years old. My parents made many mistakes, as all parents do. Despite their mistakes, there is one thing my parents always did that I am forever grateful. My parents always encouraged us girls to pursue our dreams. They not only encouraged us, they truly believed in us. My middle sister, Theresa Kulikowski, wanted to go to the Olympics. She was the alternate for the 1996 Women’s Olympic Gymnastics team. My youngest sister, Gillian Kulikowski, wanted to be a doctor. She is now a neurologist pioneering an eco-medicine cooperative in Texas. Being a congresswoman was never my dream. It is my calling. That said, I’ve decided to make it my dream, and my parents are supporting me 100% just like they did when I was growing up.

Occupation: The most relevant occupation I’ve had for Congress is Army Officer. I have six years of military leadership education (1997-2003) and four years experience serving our country as a top performing Airborne Army Officer (1999-2003).
Previous elected experience: I served honorably as an Airborne Army Officer from 1999 – 2003
Family members in government: I am the granddaughter to Frankie Kulikowski, a WWII veteran who came home with two Purple Hearts and a Bronze Star. I am the daughter to Tom Kulikowski who served in the Army as an enlisted member for 21 years – 12 years active duty and nine years in the National Guard. I am the sister to Theresa Kulikowski who served as an Army Officer Physician’s Assistant in combat. I am the sister to Gillian Kulikowski who served as an Army officer Neurologist. Serving our country and fighting for our American freedom runs in my blood.

The single most pressing issue facing our state is _______, and this is what I intend to do about it.

The single most pressing issue facing our state is ending the endless wars against covid, racism, and President Trump. I intend to keep defending President Trump’s leadership and fighting to preserve our constitutional rights. This is not a matter of what I intend to do. This is a matter of what I am already doing and will keep doing until these endless and unnecessary wars are over.

What are the critical differences between you and the other candidates seeking this post?

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Democratic poll shows neck-and-neck race brewing in Florida House district

An internal poll shows a tight race brewing in Florida’s 16th Congressional District between Democratic state Rep. Margaret Good and seven-term Rep. Vern BuchananVernon Gale BuchananMORE (R).

The internal poll from Good’s campaign, which was obtained exclusively by The Hill, shows Buchanan with a 48-45 advantage over Good among likely voters, a difference that falls within the survey’s margin of error. Another 7 percent remain undecided.

Good has a 47-41 lead among independents, and the two contenders are deadlocked at 47 percent support among seniors.

The result is a marginal improvement from the same poll conducted last month, which showed Buchanan with a 6-point advantage.

Buchanan’s favorability rating is even with 43 percent of voters saying they have a favorable view of him and 43 percent saying they have an unfavorable view. Thirty-nine percent of voters rate Good favorably, while 33 percent view her unfavorably. Twenty-eight percent of voters say they have not heard of her.

Good is also boosted by a strong showing in the poll by Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenFederal judge shoots down Texas proclamation allowing one ballot drop-off location per county Sanders endorses more than 150 down-ballot Democrats Debate commission cancels Oct. 15 Trump-Biden debate MORE, who trails President TrumpDonald John TrumpFederal judge shoots down Texas proclamation allowing one ballot drop-off location per county Nine people who attended Trump rally in Minnesota contracted coronavirus Schiff: If Trump wanted more infections ‘would he be doing anything different?’ MORE by 4 points in the district. Trump won the district by 11 points in 2016.

Good first gained prominence after flipping a state House district in 2018, ousting Sarasota real estate agent James Buchanan (R), Vern Buchanan’s son, in a race Democrats said was a sign of burgeoning party strength in the state. 

“In 2018, I won a special election to the state house that no one thought was possible because voters were ready for change and we are feeling that same energy on the ground in Florida this year,” Good told The Hill. “Voters want a representative who actually represents them, not special interests, and is committed to strengthening our economy, solving our water quality issues, and lowering healthcare costs.” 

“Our message is resonating, and we are committed to continuing to make sure it reaches every voter during the last weeks of the campaign.” 

Democrats are hopeful that the Sarasota-area district is in play this cycle after Buchanan’s margin of victory tightened in recent years. He won reelection by 24 points in 2014, 20 points in 2016 and 10 points in 2018. However, Buchanan remains well-known in the district and has the advantage of incumbency.

Florida House races have suddenly been thrust into an under-the-radar, yet important role in the presidential race.

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiLoeffler unveils resolution condemning Pelosi for comments on 25th Amendment On The Money: Trump fuels and frustrates COVID-19 relief talks | Trump proposes .8T coronavirus relief package | Vegas ties helped Trump score M windfall in 2016

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California 4th District election preview: Tom McClintock vs. Brynne Kennedy

  • Six-term Rep. Tom McClintock will face Democrat Brynne Kennedy in California’s 4th Congressional District. 
  • The district is located in east-central California and is home to all of the counties of Alpine, Amador, Calaveras, El Dorade, Maripose, and Tuolumne. 
  • The two candidates were chosen through California’s “top-two primary” system which places the top two candidates in the state’s primary on the November ballot, regardless of party.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Six-term incumbent Rep. Tom McClintock will square off against Democratic challenger Brynne Kennedy in November in California’s 4th Congressional District.

California currently has a “top-two primary” system, meaning that the top two winners of the primary election go on the final ballot, regardless of their political party.

The candidates

McClintock is a former California state assemblyman and state senator, positions he held for a total of 12 years. Before running for a position in the U.S. House of Representatives, McClintock ran for the office of state controller in 1994 and 1992, governor in the 2003 recall gubernatorial election, and lieutenant governor in the 2006 gubernatorial election, losing in every single one. 

In Congress, McClintock serves on the House Committee on the Judiciary and the Committee on Natural Resources, focusing many of his efforts on natural resource issues important to California. McClintock has sided with President Donald Trump 88% of the time in his voting record since 2017, according to FiveThirtyEight.

Kennedy is a former United States gymnast and business owner of the software company Topia. She is a former columnist for the Financial Times and is the author of a book on employee mobility. Her campaign is focused on strengthening the Affordable Care Act, combatting wildfire threats, and modernizing the United States Department of Veterans Affairs.

In 2018, McClintock defeated Democratic challenger Jessica Morse by eight percentage points, 54% to 46%, in the general election. 

The district

California’s 4th Congressional District is located in an entirely inland part of east-central California, stretching down from Truckee and South Lake Tahoe in Northern California down to the area outside of Fresno. 

It is home to all of the counties of Alpine, Amador, Calaveras, El Dorado, Mariposa, and Tuolumne as well as parts of Placer, Fresno, Madera, and Nevada counties. The district is home to some of California’s finest scenery and natural beauty, containing the Sierra Nevada Mountains and Sequoia National Forest.

In the 2016 presidential election, the 4th District voted for Trump over Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton in a 54-39 percentage point split of the vote, according to the Daily Kos.

The money race

Kennedy has narrowly outraised and outspent McClintock, according to the Center for Responsive Politics. Kennedy has brought in $1.4 million, spent $1.1 million, and has over $356,000 in cash on hand. McClintock has raised $1.35 million, spent $932,000, and currently has about $646,000 left to spend as the November election approaches. 

What experts say

The race between McClintock and Kennedy is rated as “safe Republican” by Inside Elections and “likely Republican” by the Cook Political Report

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1870 Victorian in Chagrin Falls historic district asks $1.795M: House of the Week

CHAGRIN FALLS, Ohio — 64 W. Washington St. is one of the oldest homes in Chagrin Falls. Built in 1870 by Joseph O’Malley, a prominent builder at the time who constructed many of the homes in the village’s historic district, the home belonged to John and Lucy Bullard, whose family manufactured wooden rolling pins and butter molds.

In 1917, Lucy bequeathed the home to the Congregational Church, which used it to house members of the clergy, according to the Chagrin Falls Educational Foundation.

Today, the classic Victorian retains its 19th-century character, while offering updates that bring it up the standards of buyers in the 21st century.

“It’s a great blend of the historic and the new,” says Howard Hanna listing agent Heather Price. “This is an unparalleled setting in the heart of the historic district of Chagrin Falls Village with a large private back lawn that fronts the river with a view of the high falls.”

Entering the Bullard House and into the formal living room is indeed like stepping back in time. The room features high ceilings, extensive millwork, hardwood floors, a marble fireplace and an extravagant chandelier. Through an arched doorway is a salon, where a custom bar covered in wood and an ideal spot to enjoy a nightcap await.

The kitchen is magazine-worthy, with its large island, high-end appliances and premium finishes. The modern vibe continues into the family room, which features a large picture window, providing views of the wooded surroundings and river.

Those views can also be enjoyed upstairs in the master suite, which boasts a spacious sleeping area with an ornate accent wall and double-sided fireplace, office space, luxury bath with onyx tiling, and a dressing room. In all, the home has five bedrooms and six bathrooms (four full).

For wine connoisseurs, there’s a wine cellar with a tasting area and bar in the partially finished basement.

The property includes a charming two-story carriage house, featuring an open-concept living space with a galley kitchen, bedroom and full bath.

But it’s outdoor space that separates this house from its neighbors. A belvedere at the top of the main house provides a 360-degree view of the surrounding area. The backyard is peaceful and tranquil, featuring views of the falls, landscaping with a koi pond and waterfall feature, and a large stone patio with firepit.

New to the market, the home is available for $1,795,000.

64 W. Washington St., Chagrin Falls: House of the Week

64. W. Washington St. in Chagrin Falls was built in 1870 and has 5 bedrooms and 4+2 bathrooms. The listing agent is Heather Price at Howard Hanna. (Photo by Greg Slawson)

64 W. Washington St., Chagrin Falls: House of the Week

See the full listing here

Address: 64 W. Washington St.

City: Chagrin Falls

Price: $1,795,000

Size: 4,757 sq. ft. (Zillow estimate)

Lot: 0.63 acre

Year built: 1870

No. bedrooms: 5

No. bathrooms: 4 full, 2 half

School district: Chagrin Falls Exempted Village Schools

Real estate agent and contact info: Heather Price, Howard Hanna

e: [email protected]

p: 216-526-4402

64 W. Washington St., Chagrin Falls: House of the Week
64 W. Washington St., Chagrin Falls: House of the Week

64. W. Washington St. in Chagrin Falls was built in 1870 and has 5

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Editorial: We recommend Hubert Vo in Texas House District 149

Ever since a politically unknown Vietnamese American businessman snatched Texas House District 149 from a powerful Republican budget chief in 2004, the GOP has been trying to win it back.

The soft-spoken Hubert Vo, 64, has managed to hold on to his diverse district in southwest Houston that includes Alief and Katy by focusing on local issues affecting education and small business rather than headline-grabbing social battles.

“I’m not a guy at the front mic all the time,” he told the editorial board. “I want to do some research and carry bills that make sense for the constituents and for the district.”

Yet, this time, Vo’s stance on a particularly contentious social issue is one thing that drew his Republican opposition.

Lily Truong, an education consultant in her second term on the school board, said she’s disappointed with Vo’s support of Black Lives Matter, which she associates with Marxism.

“Every single life matters to me,” Truong told the editorial board, noting discrimination she has faced as an Asian American.

Truong and Vo have similar stories of fleeing Vietnam in 1975 and struggling through poverty in the U.S. Truong has a doctorate of philosophy in natural medicine. Vo’s business acumen made him a millionaire by age 40.

Yet Vo says his own experience with discrimination helps him identify with the BLM movement.

“I think it’s important for me to support other communities who face the same thing,” he said. “I don’t think it has anything to do with Marxism … this is purely an anti-discrimination movement.”

Truong’s issues beyond education seem limited to ending abortion and warding off socialism — the latter not exactly a pressing threat in Texas. Her drive is commendable, including her get-up-and-go mentality after she was bitten by a dog while block walking.

Vo could use some of that energy. He is vice chair of Pensions, Investments & Financial Services but he lacks a standout accomplishment.

Still, the Democrat is a loyal vote for strong public schools and Medicaid expansion. He touts local wins, such as the creation of the International Management District, which Vo says beautified the area and reduced crime.

Vo has toiled behind the scenes to ensure quality health insurance plans, warn potential buyers about flooded vehicles and advance a bill last session, which stands a good chance in the coming session, to allow legal permanent residents to serve as police officers.

We recommend voters stick with Vo for another term.

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Editorial: We recommend Shawn Thierry in Texas House District 146

Two years ago, we recommended voters give state Rep. Shawn Thierry a second term representing House District 146 based on a strong freshman performance. They did so, overwhelmingly, and she delivered.

This year, having won her Democratic primary with 67 percent of the vote and again with no Republican opponent in the race, it’s an easy call to recommend voters retain her for a third term.

Thierry, 51, has been an engaged and effective voice for her constituents, roughly three-fourths of whom are Black or Hispanic.

A good example came in April, when she became alarmed at the way Black Texans and other people of color were dying at rates hugely disproportionate to their population numbers. She announced in a press conference she was writing a letter to Gov. Greg Abbott urging him to appoint a task force charged with explaining the disparate impacts of the deadly virus. By the time she sent the letter, 49 lawmakers had signed on.

A lawyer for more than 20 years before winning her first term in 2016, Thierry also was the primary author of HB 1771 during the last session, which would have prohibited the prosecution of minors for the crime of prostitution, treating them as the victims they are rather than suspected criminals. The bill passed both chambers only to be vetoed by Abbott. It was good legislation and we commend Thierry for the bill and for the leadership she showed in shepherding it through both Republican-controlled chambers.

No lawmaker should be handed another term in the Legislature unopposed, and for that reason we lament that the Republicans fielded no candidate in this race. We’re grateful that Libertarian J. J. Campbell is on the ballot. We strongly recommended voters, however, choose Thierry for another term.

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