Pawtucket’s Guild brewery now has a pop-up beer garden in Providence – Food and Dining – providencejournal.com

Every great city needs a beer garden, said Jeremy Duffy, co-founder of The Guild brewery in Pawtucket.

“They bring people together and build community,” he said.

Now, he’s doing his part to make that happen introducing The Guild PVD, a weekend-only, pop-up beer garden in downtown Providence that launched Sept. 25 for a six week run.


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The outdoor space with beer poured from a truck, occupies 4,200 square feet in the Providence Innovation District Park, by the pedestrian bridge. It will be open Friday-Sunday, with limited capacity, through Sunday, Nov. 1. There are no reservations, only walk-ins from 3 to 6 p.m. Friday, 1 to 6 p.m. Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. on Sunday.

Each weekend will also feature different food trucks organized by Smoke & Squeal BBQ and Ocean State Food Truck Festivals.

How did The Guild get here?

It started with Duffy talking to I-195 Redevelopment District Commission last year after the opening of the pedestrian bridge. They discussed The Guild offering some temporary concessions.

“This was all pre-COVID,” Duffy said.

Fast forward to last summer when Duffy was told the park was ready and setting up a beer garden would go well with Governor Raimondo’s “Take it outside” campaign.

And so a public-private partnership between The Guild, Rhode Island Commerce and the 195 Commission was born.

Though smaller than Duffy’s original vision, the space offers distanced seating for 74 people at long tables set eight feet apart, outside.

“The views are phenomenal,” he said. “Everyone seems thrilled,” he said.

The Guild, which brews for not only Guild beers, but also for Wash Ashore Beer Co., Night Shift Brewing, Devil’s Purse, Narragansett Beer and others, serves a sampling from a beer truck manned by Guild staff.

The first weekend, Duffy said they were busy the entire time and served more than 600 people from a wide selection of craft beers from The Guild brewing partners Peak Brewing Company, Monopolio and Willie’s SuperBrew.

Duffy now expects the partnership to do the beer garden on a larger scale in 2021.

In Pawtucket, The Guild never shut down during the pandemic. They did make a change to fill more cans than draft tanks destined for restaurants.

“We are probably only going to be down 10-15 percent,” Duffy said.

Retail on site took a hit, though, he said, being closed from March and opening outside only in May.

They had to cancel a lot of events, including weddings. Now they can do smaller events.

“We expect a great 2021,” he said. “But we have to get out of winter months and flu season and then get a vaccine.”

He’s hoping for a strong second quarter and teased some news.

“We have big plans, on production, with new brewers coming in.”

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San Francisco’s Farmhouse Kitchen opens glitzy Thai restaurant in Menlo Park, indoor dining included | Peninsula Foodist | Elena Kadvany

San Francisco Thai restaurant Farmhouse Kitchen has opened a glitzy new location in Menlo Park, offering limited indoor and outdoor dining, takeout and delivery.

Farmhouse Kitchen has revamped the 4,000-square-foot space at 1165 Merrill St., across from the Caltrain station, decking it out with opulent decorations (including handmade gold Thai chandeliers and flower wall), a private dining room, a lounge area with velvet chairs and gleaming full bar. The restaurant opened barely a week after San Mateo County announced that indoor dining could resume at 25% capacity or with 100 people, whichever is fewer.


The ornate dining room at Farmhouse Kitchen in Menlo Park. Photo courtesy Farmhouse Kitchen.

But the “new normal guidelines” for dining in at Farmhouse Kitchen includes a health screening, temperature check, masks required when diners aren’t eating or drinking and parties of no more than six people with reservations capped at 90 minutes. The restaurant also charges a $3 “COVID-19 sanitation fee” per table.

Kasem Saengsawang, a native of Thailand, opened his first Farmhouse Kitchen in San Francisco in 2015. The restaurant was inspired by the food he ate and cooked growing up in Loei, a rural province in northeast Thailand, but he spent much of his adult years in Bangkok.

Saengsawang now runs five restaurants, including one in Portland, Oregon. He recently moved to Menlo Park so plans to be a frequent presence at this location.


A Farmhouse Kitche appetizer: sesame-crusted ahi tuna with cucumber, seaweed salad, lemongrass and spicy chili lime. Photo courtesy Farmhouse Kitchen.

Saengsawang describes his cooking style as “contemporary.” The Farmhouse Kitchen Menlo Park menu spans Northern and Southern Thailand, including dishes like pineapple fried rice, lobster pad thai, 24-hour beef noodle soup and slow-braised short rib served with panang curry, a dish the menu says is “reminiscent” of the large childhood meals Saengsawang would cook in Thailand for his family.


The “Little Lao table set,” a $120 chef’s choice meal set that includes numerous dishes and drinks, is available at the Menlo Park location. Photo courtesy Farmhouse Kitchen.

Desserts include mango sticky rice, Thai tea crepe cake and the very Instagrammable “Thai vacation,” a halved coconut filled with sticky rice, coconut ice cream, coconut cream, peanuts and sesame, garnished with a brightly colored drink umbrella.

The Menlo Park restaurant also serves cocktails, beer and wine.

Farmhouse Kitchen is open Monday-Thursday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and 5-9 p.m., Friday 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and 5-10 p.m., Saturday noon to 10 p.m. and Sunday noon to 9 p.m.

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Swiggy’s cloud kitchen model is set to transform dining

When food delivery startup Swiggy started cloud kitchens three years ago, it was a sideshow in its food delivery business. The concept caught on as restaurant brands that had a following in one area could expand easily into new localities or even other cities. Investment in real estate was reduced because these kitchens could be smaller and didn’t need premium locations, apart from doing away with seating and the staff for serving.

Various models arose. Some introduced cloud kitchens in addition to restaurants for expansion, like Chennai’s Buhari becoming available in Coimbatore. Others like Rebel Foods created fully virtual brands that only came from dark kitchens. This became a new real estate and services play as restaurants only had to provide cooking staff while everything else, including cleaning and maintenance, could be outsourced.

Cloud kitchens caught a new impetus after the covid pandemic struck this year. Now even high-end restaurants in luxury hotels resorted to those as eating out took a nosedive and is yet to return to anywhere near the pre-covid levels. For example, Swiggy rolled out a Marriott-on-wheels with menus and prices tailored for delivery at home. Marriott could launch online-only brands whose specs varied from those of its on-premise dining.

“We help create new brands out of the existing kitchens of fine-dining restaurants,” says Vishal Bhatia, CEO, Swiggy New Supply. “For example, a premium restaurant for Chinese cuisine can use the same infrastructure to produce mass Chinese brands. We can help with the catalogue, pricing and discounting for it.”

This helps restaurants find new consumers and partially offset the under-utilization of kitchen facilities and culinary staff. “Everyone’s volumes have dropped and they’re looking for new revenue avenues,” says Bhatia.

Swiggy has co-created nearly 200 brands since the launch of this model using existing kitchens of restaurants in February. It’s too early to say how many restaurants will persist with these if they’re able to restore dining on premises, which gives them far higher margins. What started as a stopgap arrangement could get entrenched as a parallel business.

Plenty of challenges remain. Data analytics is one of the levers of online food delivery catering to mass consumers. “We can match cuisines to gaps in delivery. Then we can plug restaurants to those locations to fill the cuisine gap,” says Bhatia.

But this is still an imperfect science because consumer tastes, behaviours and cultures vary. Besides, the huge number of brands jostling for attention on a food delivery app creates a problem of visibility for all but the best-known brands.

Hygiene is another issue that cloud kitchens will have to address increasingly. The mass consumer may have been blase about this before the pandemic, but covid has raised awareness of cleanliness and what goes into food.

“We have food safety rankings and a checklist for a food safety audit of cloud kitchens. During the pandemic, because the safety team wasn’t able to visit the kitchens, we installed cameras to ensure safety protocols were followed. If the protocol isn’t followed,

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Blue Ridge Kitchen combines fine dining with comfort

As the server poured silky gazpacho over a chunk of lobster in the bowl before me, I suddenly realized how much I’ve been missing fine dining. After so many months of take-out meals or eating on casual patios, it was so nice to enjoy the upscale service offered at the new Blue Ridge Kitchen at the Barlow in Sebastopol.

After my first spoonful of the refreshing soup, I knew chef Matt D’Ambrosi is putting a lot of thought into his Cal-Creole-Cajun recipes. The chilled gazpacho is marvelous on its own, in a sweet-tart, peach-colored puree of melon and tomato dotted with radish, a round of chopped avocado and shiny drops of basil oil ($9). With the generous chunk of seafood (add $7) and the elegant tableside presentation, it’s luxurious.

All the details line up so well at this classy spot, which took over the former Zazu Farm + Restaurant space that was vacated in 2018. For now, we eat on the patio, a pretty area set with wood tables and European-style bistro chairs, all shaded by sailcloth and flanked by trees, herb gardens and flowers. I’m looking forward to when we can eat inside, too, and admire the centerpiece cocktail bar and the open kitchen.

D’Ambrosi was known for his creative cooking at Healdsburg’s Spoonbar, Harmon Guest House and Pizzando. Here, he comes up with inventive dishes like carrot cake pancakes. The brunch specialty makes a delicious statement; it’s a sweet but not sugary hybrid of carrot and apple soufflé cakes on a pond of cream cheese-poppy seed glaze and topped with golden raisins, candied pecans and smoked maple syrup ($18).

Overall, though, there’s nothing weird on this expansive, all-day menu. You can get something as simple as a perfect smash burger with secret sauce ($9.50) or as indulgent as a nicely charred New York steak served in a metal pan with grilled asparagus, sauce béarnaise, crispy ham fingerling potatoes, cowboy steak sauce and roasted tomato ($39). The constant theme is the kitchen’s skill, making this my new favorite place to dine.

You can eat affordably, filling up on a first-rate rigatoni sugo dressed with braised pork cheek, San Marzano tomatoes, basil, Parmesan and breadcrumbs ($22). Or you can splurge, with a monster-size Tomahawk steak that feeds several people ($95), embellished with a whole lobster for a surf and turf ($58).

Some items are classics, such as the ahi tartare on a round bed of smashed avocado with cucumber, spicy aioli and big, puffy rice chips that melt in the mouth ($18). Yet an Asian pear coulis adds modern brightness to the dish, crispy quinoa adds crunch and a cute bouquet of daikon sprouts peeking out of the tartare’s middle adds peppery bite.

Another classic, the “raw platter” (daily market price), brings two tiers of iced seafood: a whole Maine lobster tail, sumac-spiced jumbo prawns, ceviche, oysters, horseradish cocktail sauce, smoky apple mignonette and a scoop of refreshing Meyer lemon hibiscus granita. Arranged with sea greens, edible flowers and lemon

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Reservations for November Living Kitchen dinners open Saturday | Dining



Living Kitchen (copy)

Chef Lisa Becklund (left) and Linda Ford operate Living Kitchen Farm and Dairy near Depew. Reservations for their farm-to-table dinners in November will open to the public Saturday, Oct. 3.




Living Kitchen Farm and Dairy will begin taking reservations for its November Farm Table Dinners at 7 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 3.

Living Kitchen offers seven- to nine-course tasting menus using ingredients grown, produced or foraged on the farm, or purchased from other local farms. The dinners are a community dining experience served at a common table on the screened-in back porch of a cabin on the farm’s property.

Because of COVID-19 restrictions, only 20 to 24 guests will be allowed to take part in each dinner, so the dinners will likely sell out even quicker than usual.

The November dinner schedule includes two meals: “Northwest Passage,” in which chef Lisa Becklund will combine special culinary delights from her hometown of Seattle with Oklahoma produce, which will be offered Nov. 6-7; and “The Feast Days,” which will focus on the bounty associated with Thanksgiving, and which will be offered Nov. 13-14 and 20-21.

Cost is $110 per person, which includes the dinner, nonalcoholic beverages and gratuity.

Reservations must be made through the Living Kitchen’s Tock page. To register and more information: livingkitchenfarmanddairy.com.

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Marian House drops ‘soup kitchen’ to reflect restaurant-style dining | Homeless

Colorado Springs’ oldest soup kitchen has been feeding anyone in need of a meal for 50 years, and now, the Marian House is dropping the “soup” and the “kitchen.”

The phrase conjures up a downtrodden image of broth with floating bits of meat or vegetables, said Rochelle Schlortt, spokeswoman for Catholic Charities of Central Colorado, which operates the Marian House in downtown Colorado Springs.

But the Marian House has been and continues to provide much more than that, she said.

The daily lunchtime meal, now under COVID-19 restrictions served from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in eight seatings, provides hot food that includes a main dish, side dish, salad, bread, dessert and drink.

“For many, this is their only meal of the day,” Schlortt said. “It’s high-calorie, nutritious and well-balanced.”

Rearranging seating from picnic-style tables and benches to round tables and chairs, and providing “generous portions” of pre-plated meals instead of a cafeteria-type of serving line, has turned the “soup kitchen” into a dining hall  that’s more like a restaurant, Schlortt said.

The changes add dignity and give guests a feeling of dining instead of receiving an institutional service, she said.


Homeless could lose safe haven as gentrification comes to Colorado Springs

COVID-19 also added the need for a meal card with the guests’ names and contact, in case tracing is needed in the event of virus infections, said Lorri Orwig, senior vice president of operations.

However, “we’re not going to turn anyone away,” she said.

The changes come as Springs Rescue Mission, another campus about a mile away that also offers homeless services, has expanded and on Thursday began serving breakfast, lunch and dinner meals to a clientele that is primarily the chronically homeless population.

The Marian House now is shifting to focus on families, seniors, people with disabilities and the working poor, many of which are served in its other programs that include assistance with employment, housing, medical care, literacy, language, counseling, budgeting, family matters, legal issues, identification and other needs.

The pandemic has decreased meals from 500 to 600 a day to a maximum of 288 in the main dining room and a few families in a separate family room.

The organization is not sure where the hundreds of other clients went, but Schlortt speculates that families have been staying at home more and getting food from local pantries and school distributions.

“We tend to look at COVID as all the things it’s prevented us from doing, but from our perspective, it allowed us to move forward to making some changes we’ve wanted to do for some time,” Schlortt said.

“It was time to make our dining hall more welcoming, more dignified and have servers for our guests.”

Anyone interested in volunteering at the Marian House can call 866-6559.


Pandemic relief funding helps get homeless Colorado Springs vets off streets

Contact the writer: 719-476-1656.

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The Wayfair Sale Is Full of Kitchen and Dining Steals

This week’s big Wayfair sale, called Way Day might not be on your radar—after all, this big box retailer is best known for its discounted furniture, not its kitchen goods. But a poking around the sale proved that in addition to endless bed frames and sofas, there are some great finds for your kitchen and dining room here, too. While we could have just as easily focused on the dining room tables (glass! square! oval! wood!) we honed in on a few things that will upgrade your dining-from-home situation on the cheap: chic woven baskets, nice kitchen linens, and tidy little bar carts to keep that end-of-day drink feeling festive. Read on for some of our favorites.

Baskets In Every Possible Shape and Weave

A basket or two in your kitchen will help keep kitchen linens tidy. This one is big enough to hold throw blankets too—I’d keep it by the door to the backyard for easy access on chilly evenings…because I am fully committed to eating outdoors as long as possible this fall. Woven baskets are also great for bringing your plants indoors: just make sure you’ve got a saucer securely under your pot, and then place inside a roomy basket. 

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Pair of Handwoven Baskets

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Seagrass Baskets, Set of 3

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Woven Baskets With Handles, Set of 3

Bar Carts for Every Style of Home

Maybe the pandemic has made you into a great sourdough baker…maybe it’s just made you better at pouring cocktails. If you’re in the later camp, it might be time for a bar cart. Having a tidy place for booze (or booze-free drink additions, like bitters and fun seltzers) makes the evening drink a bit more celebratory. 

Image may contain: Furniture, Corner, Shelf, Interior Design, Indoors, Table, and Rug
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Cotton and Linen Dishtowels, Napkins, and Pot Holders

A cotton towel is a true kitchen workhorse: use it for spills, to wrap up bread and baked goods, and as a napkin in a pinch. If you’re anything like me, though, all those coffee, red wine, and tomato sauce stains take a toll after a while. Luckily, there’s a big selection in the Wayfair sale—plus pot holders and aprons too. 

Image may contain: Bath Towel, Towel, Wallet, Accessories, and Accessory

Blue Patterned Dish Towels, Set of 5

Image may contain: Clothing, Apparel, Home Decor, Dress, Sleeve, Fashion, Robe, Linen, Long Sleeve, Human, and Person
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Orange Patterned Dish Towels, Set of 4

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Fair Trade 2-Piece Potholder and Oven Mitt Set

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Five tips on starting a fall veggie garden, including how to get transplants, soil delivered – Food and Dining – Austin American-Statesman

We seem to have an earlier introduction to fall than usual, with slightly cooler temperatures and rain in the first half of September rather than the second. Sometimes, we don’t get those hints of fall until October.

With so many fall events canceled, many of us are looking for ways to stay active at home, which might mean starting a fall vegetable garden for the first time. Whether you’re a true novice or returning to gardening after a break, here are five Austin-centric tips for getting started.

1. You’re gonna need good soil. Don’t rely on the dirt that’s already in your backyard. Pick up several bags of gardening soil and at least one bag of compost. Add a few scoopfuls of compost to each raised bed and then do that again in a few months, around the base of the plants.

2. Start some plants with seeds but use transplants for others. Carrots, cilantro, lettuce and radishes are best started from seed, but I like using already established transplants for brassicas, including broccoli and cauliflower. Beets, kale, chard and other greens you can start from seeds or transplants. (You can start some of those transplants yourself inside in those black seedling trays.) It’s not too late to throw late-season peppers and tomatoes in the ground, but those should be already established plants. Here’s a Central Texas guide for when to plant what.

3. You can get many garden supplies delivered, including transplants. In Austin, Lone Star Nursery used to be a wholesale nursery, but now they are focusing exclusively on delivering to home gardeners, and they are also already selling fall transplants that aren’t yet for sale at other gardening stores. There are more garden supply stores than you might think in the Austin area, but not all of them have fall vegetable transplants this early in the season.

4. Keep those seedlings moist. We still have temperatures in the upper 80s and low 90s, which is tough on these cool weather-loving plants, so make sure you water every day in the morning. Many plants also wouldn’t mind a spritz again in the evening. The upside about starting a fall garden early is that you can start to harvest some of these greens and veggies in October and November, but the downside is they need a little extra TLC to get started. The extra fragile ones, like lettuce and carrots, might need a little shade if we get some extra hot afternoons later this month.

5. Ask for help. Gardeners love to give advice, and farmers do, too, especially if you’re buying produce from them at the farmers market. Some farmers markets, including Barton Creek Farmers Market on Saturdays where Rasmey’s Garden sells veggie transplants, have booths were you can buy transplants and chat with a grower to get more tips specific to what you want to grow. As a result of the coronavirus, many gardening groups and experts are hosting virtual classes this fall to help get you

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Five tips on starting a fall veggie garden, including how to get transplants, soil delivered – Food and Dining – Austin 360

We seem to have an earlier introduction to fall than usual, with slightly cooler temperatures and rain in the first half of September rather than the second. Sometimes, we don’t get those hints of fall until October.

With so many fall events canceled, many of us are looking for ways to stay active at home, which might mean starting a fall vegetable garden for the first time. Whether you’re a true novice or returning to gardening after a break, here are five Austin-centric tips for getting started.

1. You’re gonna need good soil. Don’t rely on the dirt that’s already in your backyard. Pick up several bags of gardening soil and at least one bag of compost. Add a few scoopfuls of compost to each raised bed and then do that again in a few months, around the base of the plants.

2. Start some plants with seeds but use transplants for others. Carrots, cilantro, lettuce and radishes are best started from seed, but I like using already established transplants for brassicas, including broccoli and cauliflower. Beets, kale, chard and other greens you can start from seeds or transplants. (You can start some of those transplants yourself inside in those black seedling trays.) It’s not too late to throw late-season peppers and tomatoes in the ground, but those should be already established plants. Here’s a Central Texas guide for when to plant what.

3. You can get many garden supplies delivered, including transplants. In Austin, Lone Star Nursery used to be a wholesale nursery, but now they are focusing exclusively on delivering to home gardeners, and they are also already selling fall transplants that aren’t yet for sale at other gardening stores. There are more garden supply stores than you might think in the Austin area, but not all of them have fall vegetable transplants this early in the season.

4. Keep those seedlings moist. We still have temperatures in the upper 80s and low 90s, which is tough on these cool weather-loving plants, so make sure you water every day in the morning. Many plants also wouldn’t mind a spritz again in the evening. The upside about starting a fall garden early is that you can start to harvest some of these greens and veggies in October and November, but the downside is they need a little extra TLC to get started. The extra fragile ones, like lettuce and carrots, might need a little shade if we get some extra hot afternoons later this month.

5. Ask for help. Gardeners love to give advice, and farmers do, too, especially if you’re buying produce from them at the farmers market. Some farmers markets, including Barton Creek Farmers Market on Saturdays where Rasmey’s Garden sells veggie transplants, have booths were you can buy transplants and chat with a grower to get more tips specific to what you want to grow. As a result of the coronavirus, many gardening groups and experts are hosting virtual classes this fall to help get you

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New dining option Roselily at L Street Kitchen in South Bend to open soon | Market Basket

Family has always been at the forefront of chef Eamonn McParland’s mind and, in his family, the restaurant business has intertwined with it.

“Food and restaurants and cooking has always been a part of us,” McParland said.

McParland grew up in a cooking family, with his mother and stepfather Meg and Mike LaCarrubba previously operating and cooking at diners in Staten Island and North Carolina through the years.

So, after years of honing his skills and gastronomy at Render Kitchen and Bar, it’s no surprise that when McParland decided to leave his partnership at Render earlier this year, part of that consideration was because of family. In August 2019, twins Liliana and Mariana were born prematurely and, during their time in the NICU, McParland had time to reflect on how he wanted to be there for them and also what his own future looked like.

“The break happened and I felt like it was time to create a life of my own,” he said. “As much as I was a part of Render, it wasn’t mine alone. Now, I have the opportunity to control the experience the moment (customers) walk in the door to the moment they leave.”

During the five-month hiatus, the identical twins have grown strong and so has McParland’s appetite in creating his own restaurant. And now that he’s ready, his family is with him at every step.

“It is funny how things come full circle, because when they moved up here, I helped Mike open up this place,” McParland said. “But now, I’m back here and he’s helping me.”

The new restaurant will be “familiar, simple and approachable without being boring or sloppy,” McParland describes, with a warm ambiance curated by Sandra. McParland will be leading the kitchen, offering familiar items like burgers and fried chicken sandwiches along with more upscale options like steak tartar and pork belly.

The menu may change frequently, depending upon what is seasonal, local or what is available for McParland to create with, but burgers and chicken sandwiches will become staples. A seasonal vegetarian and vegan menu will also be available, and McParland said the kitchen will be considerate of food allergies. Since the business doesn’t qualify for the riverfront liquor licensing, only beer and wine will be served at the restaurant, but McParland said he is working on a specific list.

“I wanted to still do the fun food I’ve done in the past like at Render,” he said. “But I also wanted to have more approachable options.”

The space itself will also see some transformations, with Sandra and mother Meg combining the two ambiances of a diner by day and elevated restaurant by night.

New butcher block table tops will replace old tables, and black metal chairs will be swapped out for old wooden high back chairs. New wood-laminate floors will also be installed, as well as greenery and homey decor placed around the space. The restaurant also plans to create an outdoor patio space just in time for

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