Three Days After Trump’s COVID Diagnosis, White House Tells Staff With Symptoms to Stay Home

The White House has told staff that if they are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19, they should stay home. The advice comes a full three days after President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump tested positive for the virus.

An all-staff email sent on Sunday urges anyone with COVID symptoms to “please stay home” and “do not come to work.” The email also tells any staff with symptoms to “immediately contact your primary care provider” and “inform [your] supervisors.”

The email was obtained by New York Magazine‘s Washington Correspondent Olivia Nuzzi. She took to Twitter to point out that the advice came only after the president was admitted to Walter Reed Medical Center with the disease.

“Three days after the public learned about President Trump’s COVID-19 infection and the viruses spread through the White House and federal government, WH staff finally received an email telling them what to do if they have symptoms,” Nuzzi wrote.

The email says, in part: “If you or your colleagues believe that you should be practicing telework, or have questions about your ability to do so, please contact your supervisor.”

Nuzzi also noted confusion and even anger at the White House about the way the administration handled the president’s diagnosis. There has been significant criticism about mixed messaging surrounding his illness.

“[A] senior White House official was angry that staff had been kept in the dark, that nobody had been told what to do about the virus spreading rapidly in their own workplace,” Nuzzi said.

There was criticism of how the Trump administration was dealing with COVID-19 even before the president’s diagnosis. His decision to mock former Vice President Joe Biden for wearing a mask at the first presidential debate contrasted with reports that mask-wearing isn’t required at the White House and there are no plans to make it mandatory.

“Our standard protocol is CDC best practices and recommendations,” a White House official told Axioson October 2. “Facial coverings are recommended but not required. There’s hand sanitizing stations located throughout the complex, frequent washing of hands and good hygiene is strongly recommended and social distancing is encouraged. So, I don’t foresee those things changing.”

In a video posted on Sunday, Trump said he’d learned more about COVID since his admission to Walter Reed. He also briefly left the hospital for a short drive where he waved at supporters.

“It’s been a very interesting journey. I learned a lot about COVID. I learned it by really going to school. This is the real school. This isn’t the ‘let’s read the books’ school,” Trump said in a video

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The White House has been unclear on timeline leading up to Trump’s COVID-19 diagnosis. Here’s more details on his travels in the past week.

President Donald Trump announced early Friday that he and first lady, Melania Trump, tested positive for COVID-19.

The world reacts after President Trump and first lady Melania test positive for COVID-19

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Since then, the White House has sent mixed signals about his condition and the timeline of events leading up to his diagnosis and transfer to the hospital.

White House physician and Navy Cmdr. Sean Conley said Sunday that President Donald Trump continues to improve in his battle against COVID-19 and could be discharged.

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“There are frequent ups and downs … particularly when a patient is being so closely watched 24 hours a day,” said Conley. “If he continues to look and feel as well as he does today our hope is that we can plan for a discharge as early as tomorrow to the White House, where he can continue his treatment course.”



Donald Trump in a suit standing in front of a crowd: President Donald Trump throws hats to supporters after speaking at a campaign rally at Duluth International Airport in Duluth, Minn. on Sept. 30, 2020.


© Alex Brandon, AP
President Donald Trump throws hats to supporters after speaking at a campaign rally at Duluth International Airport in Duluth, Minn. on Sept. 30, 2020.

Meanwhile, aides sought to portray an image of business as usual despite lingering uncertainty over the severity of his case.

After an update on Trump’s health at a news conference Saturday, an administration official – later identified by the Associated Press and the New York Times as chief of staff Mark Meadows – met with reporters and described the president’s condition earlier in the week as “very concerning.”

Events are still unclear, but some details were compiled by USA TODAY after examining reports by the White House pool of reporters, as well as Trump’s recent schedules.

Friday, Sept. 25 – week before diagnosis

11:11 a.m. EDT:  Trump attends Latinos for Trump roundtable 

First on the president’s schedule Friday was a Latinos for Trump roundtable in Doral, Florida. Trump arrived Thursday night after a rally in Jacksonville.

3:08 p.m. EDT: Trump speaks on Black Empowerment

Trump traveled to Atlanta, Georgia to speak at the Cobb Galleria Centre.  There, he spoke on Black empowerment and unveiled a new plan, dubbed the Black Economic Empowerment “Platinum Plan,” aimed at winning over Black voters ahead of the November election.



Brian P. Kemp wearing a suit and tie talking on a cell phone: President Donald Trump greets Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp and his wife Marty as he arrives at Dobbins Air Reserve Base for a campaign event at the Cobb Galleria Centre, Sept. 25, 2020, in Atlanta.


© Evan Vucci, AP
President Donald Trump greets Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp and his wife Marty as he arrives at Dobbins Air Reserve Base for a campaign event at the Cobb Galleria Centre, Sept. 25, 2020, in Atlanta.

4:26 p.m. EDT: Traveling back to Washington

6:29 p.m. EDT: Trump hosts fundraiser in Washington

Trump attended a fundraiser event at his hotel in Washington, D.C. Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel, who was at the function, has since reported her coronavirus-positive status.  

8:48 p.m. EDT: Trump hosts rally in Newport News, Virginia

Around 4,000 people gathered at the Newport News/Williamsburg International Airport Friday night for Trump’s “Make America Great Again” rally.



Donald Trump et al. around each other: NEWPORT NEWS, VA - SEPTEMBER 25: U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally at Newport News/Williamsburg International Airport on September 25, 2020 in Newport News, Virginia. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)


© Drew Angerer, Getty Images
NEWPORT NEWS, VA – SEPTEMBER 25: U.S.

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5 big questions on the White House’s botched handling of Trump’s coronavirus diagnosis

As with previous flaps over Trump’s health, there is clearly tension between projecting the kind of strength he likes to see and providing actual, sober-minded details — a tension that White House chief of staff Mark Meadows seemed to acknowledge in his own updates on Trump’s situation.

Speaking to reporters Saturday, Meadows acknowledged that Trump was probably watching him on TV and “probably critiquing the way that I’m answering these questions.”

As of Sunday afternoon, there are very valid questions about whether anyone providing details of Trump’s health, including Conley and Meadows, can be trusted. Let’s run down the major questions and contradictions.

1. The oxygen question

At the start of Saturday’s briefings, Conley said Trump “this morning is not on oxygen, not having difficulty breathing or walking around the White House Medical Unit upstairs.”

But that seemed carefully worded. So he wasn’t on oxygen that morning, reporters noted, but what about before?

Conley repeatedly avoided a direct answer, focusing on the present tense:

QUESTION: And he is receiving no — he has not received any supplemental oxygen?

CONLEY: He is not on oxygen right now, that’s right.

QUESTION: He has not received any at all?

CONLEY: He has not needed any this morning today at all. That’s right. Now he’s —

QUESTION: Has he ever been on supplemental oxygen?

CONLEY: Right now, he is not on oxygen —

QUESTION: I understand. I know you keep saying right now. But should we read into the fact that he had been previously —

CONLEY: Yesterday and today he was not on oxygen.

QUESTION: So, he has not been on it during his covid treatment?

CONLEY: He is not on oxygen right now.

When you keep dodging a question like that, it’s for one of two reasons: a) You don’t know the answer (which seems extremely unlikely given that this is Trump’s White House doctor), or, the much-more-likely, b) Trump was on oxygen at some point, but Conley was trying to avoid acknowledging that.

The White House later confirmed, anonymously, that Trump was given oxygen at the White House on Friday before going to Walter Reed hospital. But if that’s the case, it contradicts one of Conley’s answers, when he said, “Yesterday and today he was not on oxygen.”

Conley on Sunday also acknowledged Trump had been on oxygen, while building on his increasingly bizarre commentary. He said that he was “not necessarily” intending to mislead and that he want to be publicly “upbeat.” But he added that he didn’t want to say anything Saturday “that might steer the course of illness in another direction” — as if acknowledging the truth could worsen Trump’s condition.

So for all intents and purposes, he was being deliberately misleading. That alone should call the White House’s candor on this stuff into extreme question. And why wouldn’t the same motivations apply to Sunday’s and future briefings? Are we to now believe that Conley isn’t putting the same rose-colored filter on everything?

It also bears

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Panic and confusion permeate White House after Trump’s Covid diagnosis

Golden autumn sunshine shone down on Washington on Saturday to illuminate a US capital upended as Donald Trump began his first full day in hospital battling coronavirus amid a presidential election thrown into chaos.



a large clock tower towering over White House: Photograph: J Scott Applewhite/AP


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Photograph: J Scott Applewhite/AP

Related: Amy Coney Barrett: quick confirmation under threat as three senators infected

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Just hours earlier, on Friday evening after an excruciating wait for news, the president had emerged from the White House with a lacklustre wave and thumbs up, but ignoring reporters’ shouted questions about the state of his health.

Trump stalked slowly across the south lawn and boarded the US presidential helicopter. The only visual clue that something profound had changed was Trump’s face: he was wearing a mask.

As Marine One lifted into the sky just before sunset, the president left behind a White House staff suddenly rudderless, fearful and unsure how the story will end. The reality TV star turned president has delivered his greatest moment of suspense and the presidential election with its first “October surprise” but maybe not its last.

Trump, 74, is spending the weekend at a military hospital near Washington after discovering that not even the commander in chief of the world’s most powerful country is immune to the coronavirus. Said to be feverish and fatigued, there is huge uncertainty over his condition, its potential to deteriorate and whether he might become incapacitated.

In his absence, the mood in the White House was said to be one of panic, with growing concern over the extent of the spread of the virus within the building and whether it could disrupt the functioning of government.

Staff have taken their lead from Trump’s bubble of denial for months, eschewing face masks and congregating in the west wing’s cramped spaces and narrow hallways. The president’s positive test was chilling proof of what the rest of the country has long known: no one is safe.

“People are losing their minds,” one source told the Washington Post newspaper.

As Friday wore on and Trump’s condition worsened, staff were also forced to confront the possibility that his health could be at serious risk. An information vacuum filled with rumour and speculation and did little to calm nerves, with media outlets forced to depend on leaks from anonymous officials or presidential tweets such as: “Going welI, I think! Thank you to all. LOVE!!!”

The heavily guarded White House is one of the world’s most secure properties with a new 13ft tall fence to keep out intruders, protesters and terrorists. Yet it too was breached by the invisible pathogen that has killed more than 205,000 Americans. Commentators said there could be no greater proof of the administration’s failure to combat the pandemic.

How, when or from whom Trump became infected remains a mystery. But the myth of invulnerability may have been finally shattered by an event in the White House Rose Garden last Saturday in which he nominated judge Amy Coney Barrett to the supreme court. More

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Trump’s COVID diagnosis thrusts coronavirus pandemic back to forefront of White House race

While Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden heads to the crucial battleground state of Florida on Monday, President Trump is hospitalized at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after being diagnosed with COVID-19.

After months of mocking the former vice president for his light in-person campaign schedule amid the coronavirus pandemic and ridiculing him for “hiding in his basement” at his home in Delaware, it’s now Trump’s who is sidelined and forced to postpone events, with a month to go until Election Day on Nov. 3, and with millions of Americans already casting absentee ballots or early voting at polling stations.

LIVE UPDATES FROM FOX NEWS ON TRUMP’S HOSPITALIZATION FOR CORONAVIRUS

And with the clock ticking — and the president trailing Biden in the latest public opinion polls in many of the key battleground states that will decide the White House winner — the spotlight in the presidential election has dramatically shifted once again.

Just two weeks after the death of trailblazing Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg rocked the race for the White House, giving the president an opportunity to rally Republicans by moving to quickly confirm a conservative justice to succeed the liberal-leaning Ginsburg on the high court, the focus of the campaign has been upended again.

President Donald Trump arrives at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, in Bethesda, Md., Friday, Oct. 2, 2020, on Marine One helicopter after he tested positive for COVID-19. White House chief of staff Mark Meadows is at second from left. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

President Donald Trump arrives at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, in Bethesda, Md., Friday, Oct. 2, 2020, on Marine One helicopter after he tested positive for COVID-19. White House chief of staff Mark Meadows is at second from left. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

The president’s confirmation early Friday morning that he and first lady Melania Trump had tested positive for COVID-19 instantly put the focus of the White House race firmly back on the coronavirus and the Trump administration’s efforts to fight the pandemic. That was further heightened hours later when Trump was admitted to Walter Reed.

“It’s not good news for the president in that the focus is now going to be on Covid-19, and when the focus is on Covid-19 Biden has a 10, 11, 12-point advantage,” veteran Republican pollster and communications consultant Frank Luntz said on Fox News’ “The Daily Briefing with Dana Perino.”

Luntz stressed that “the economy is Donald Trump’s strength, and the fact that he can’t get out there now is going to be a challenge for the campaign.”

“Fox News Sunday” anchor Chris Wallace agreed that “the coronavirus and the president’s handling of it is going to the top of the agenda.”

Wallace, who moderated Tuesday’s first presidential debate between Biden and Trump, spotlighted on “America’s Newsroom” that the pandemic “becomes the most important issue. … The general feeling on some peoples’ part is that the president hasn’t been cautious enough and that Biden has been too cautious. That’s going to be an issue now going forward.”

The pandemic swept the nation in February and March. Two weeks ago, the nation passed another grim milestone, as more than 200,000 COVID-19-related deaths were recorded, with than 7 million infections confirmed across the country.

Over the past

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In the wake of Trump’s COVID-19 diagnosis, the White House has yet to mobilize a CDC tracing team to contact hundreds of people who were in the president’s company



a group of people sitting at a park: President Donald Trump and Judge Amy Coney Barrett in the Rose Garden at the White House on Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020. Alex Brandon/AP Photo


© Alex Brandon/AP Photo
President Donald Trump and Judge Amy Coney Barrett in the Rose Garden at the White House on Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020. Alex Brandon/AP Photo

  • The White House is yet to deploy a ‘test and trace’ team of CDC experts following the president’s COVID-19 diagnosis, reported The Washington Post. 
  • The team’s function is to trace test those the president came into contact with while infected to stop the disease spreading further. 
  • Trump attended a fundraiser with 200 people and was in frequent contact with top officials while infected. 
  • Trump has long sought to downplay the seriousness of the disease that has killed more than 200,000 Americans. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The White House has yet to deploy a specialist Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) team to track and test those whom President Donald Trump came into contact with after being infected with the coronavirus. 

Two sources told The Washington Post Saturday that the CDC specialists’ team was on standby but had not yet begun to work tracing all of those the president came into contact with while infected. 

Contact tracing is one of the critical methods advocated by public health officials to contain the spread of coronavirus. The CDC in guidelines on its website says tracing “will be conducted for close contacts (any individual within 6 feet of an infected person for at least 15 minutes) of laboratory-confirmed or probable COVID-19 patients.”

It is not known precisely how or when Trump contracted the virus. Adviser Hope Hicks tested positive for the disease Wednesday and had traveled with the president to his debate with Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden in Cleveland, Ohio, on Tuesday.

Following the debate, Trump took part in several public events, attending a fundraiser at his golf resort in Bedminster, New Jersey, with 200 people only hours before testing positive on Thursday.

The previous day the president had traveled to Minnesota. He held a rally in front of hundreds of supporters, many unmasked, and met top state Republicans at a campaign fundraiser.

Officials in states where Trump has held events recently told the Post that they had not been contacted by the White House about tracing the president’s contacts and were mainly acting independently to find them.

Video: Why the next 48 hours are ‘critical’ for President Trump’s COVID prognosis (FOX News)

Why the next 48 hours are ‘critical’ for President Trump’s COVID prognosis

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In the wake of the president’s diagnoses, several senior Republicans have also been found to be COVID-19 positive, including former presidential adviser Kellyanne Conway, Senator Mike Lee, Senator Thom Tillis, Notre Dame University president John Jenkins, and former New Jersey governor Chris Christie. 

There is speculation that a White House ceremony a week before Trump’s diagnosis to announce Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, Amy Coney Barrett, may have been the “superspreader” event where many became infected. 

At the event, few observed social distancing measures or wore masks, and some guests hugged

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Panic and confusion permeate White House following Trump’s Covid diagnosis

Golden autumn sunshine shone down on Washington on Saturday to illuminate a US capital upended as Donald Trump began his first full day in hospital battling coronavirus amid a presidential election thrown into chaos.



a large clock tower towering over White House: Photograph: J Scott Applewhite/AP


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: J Scott Applewhite/AP

Related: Amy Coney Barrett: quick confirmation under threat as three senators infected

Just hours earlier, on Friday evening after an excruciating wait for news, the president had emerged from the White House with a lacklustre wave and thumbs up, but ignoring reporters’ shouted questions about the state of his health.

Trump stalked slowly across the south lawn and boarded the US presidential helicopter. The only visual clue that something profound had changed was Trump’s face: he was wearing a mask.

As Marine One lifted into the sky just before sunset, the president left behind a White House staff suddenly rudderless, fearful and unsure how the story will end. The reality TV star turned president has delivered his greatest moment of suspense and the presidential election with its first “October surprise” but maybe not its last.

Trump, 74, is spending the weekend at a military hospital near Washington after discovering that not even the commander in chief of the world’s most powerful country is immune to the coronavirus. Said to be feverish and fatigued, there is huge uncertainty over his condition, its potential to deteriorate and whether he might become incapacitated.

In his absence, the mood in the White House was said to be one of panic, with growing concern over the extent of the spread of the virus within the building and whether it could disrupt the functioning of government.

Staff have taken their lead from Trump’s bubble of denial for months, eschewing face masks and congregating in the west wing’s cramped spaces and narrow hallways. The president’s positive test was chilling proof of what the rest of the country has long known: no one is safe.

“People are losing their minds,” one source told the Washington Post newspaper.

As Friday wore on and Trump’s conditioned worsened, staff were also forced to confront the possibility that his health could be at serious risk. An information vacuum filled with rumour and speculation and did little to calm nerves, with media outlets forced to depend on leaks from anonymous officials or presidential tweets such as: “Going welI, I think! Thank you to all. LOVE!!!”

The heavily guarded White House is one of the world’s most secure properties with a new 13ft tall fence to keep out intruders, protesters and terrorists. Yet it too was breached by the invisible pathogen that has killed more than 205,000 Americans. Commentators said there could be no greater proof of the administration’s failure to combat the pandemic.

How, when or from whom Trump became infected remains a mystery. But the myth of invulnerability may have been finally shattered by an event in the White House Rose Garden last Saturday in which he nominated judge Amy Coney Barrett to the supreme court. More than

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White House official says Conley misrepresented timeline of Trump’s diagnosis

After Dr. Sean Conley created significant confusion on the timeline of President Donald Trump’s diagnosis, telling reporters Trump was “72 hours into the diagnosis now,” a White House official said Conley meant that Trump was on Day 3 of the illness.

The official said the diagnosis was made Thursday night, making Saturday the third day into his diagnosis.

The White House official also said Conley misspoke when he said Trump had been administered a Covid-19 treatment from Regeneron 48 hours ago. It was given to Trump later Thursday night, according to the official.

The timeline of Trump’s diagnosis is important.

Trump notified the public that he had tested positive just before 1 a.m. Eastern on Friday. He held campaign events on Wednesday and Thursday.

 

The questions Trump’s doctor evaded at the Walter Reed briefing

Dr. Sean Conley, President Donald Trump’s White House physician, dodged several key questions Saturday as he briefed a small group of reporters outside Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where the president is being treated.

  • Has he been on any supplemental oxygen? Conley was pressed several times to answer this question. He repeatedly said Trump was not receiving oxygen Saturday morning and eventually said, “Thursday, no oxygen, none at this moment, and yesterday with the team, while we were all here, he was not on oxygen.” Conley, however, would not say whether Trump previously received oxygen at the White House.
  • When was the president’s last negative test? Conley said he’s “not going to get into testing going back.”
  • Has the president had any lung damage? “We’re following all of that. We do daily ultrasounds. We do daily lab work. The team is tracking all of that,” said Conley, who, when pressed again to answer the question, said he wouldn’t get into their findings.
  • How was the president infected and when did it happen? Conley declined to answer these questions.
  • What was Trump’s fever when he had it? Conley said the president has been fever-free over the last 24 hours. He said Trump had a fever Thursday into Friday but he would “rather not give any specific numbers” when asked for Trump’s actual temperature when he had the fever.

McConnell announces the Senate will not return until Oct. 19, Barrett confirmation hearings to go on as planned

After news that three GOP senators tested positive for Covid-19, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced in a statement Saturday that the Senate will not come back into session until Oct. 19. 

“On Monday, I intend to obtain a consent agreement for the Senate to meet in pro forma sessions for the next two weeks. Previously-scheduled floor activity will be rescheduled until after October 19th,” McConnell said. 

The Senate had originally been scheduled to return to Washington next week.

The confirmation hearing process for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett will go on as planned,

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Trump’s Doctor’s Briefing Raises More Questions COVID-19 Diagnosis

During a press conference Saturday from Walter Reed National Military Center, where President Donald Trump was admitted Friday, White House physician Sean Conley said he and his medical team are “extremely happy with the progress” Trump has made since he announced he tested positive for COVID-19 early Friday morning.

However, some of the information provided at the briefing raised even more questions about the state of the President’s health and the timeline of his illness.

Conley said that the President had “a mild cough and some nasal congestion and fatigue” on Thursday, “all of which are now resolving and improving.” The President had a fever Thursday into Friday, but has been fever-free since Friday morning, he said.

Dr. Sean Dooley, another member of the President’s medical team, said the team is also monitoring President Trump’s cardiac function, kidney function and liver function, all of which are currently healthy. He added that the president is in “exceptionally good spirits” and told the team that he felt like he “could walk out of here today.” When asked about the President’s risk factors, Conley said that Trump is a 74-year old man who is “slightly overweight,” which puts him at a greater risk of complications from the virus. But Conley said both the President’s cholesterol and blood pressure are healthy.

However, shortly after the conference ended, the White House press pool received a much more alarming statement from a source familiar with the President’s health. “The President’s vitals over the last 24 hours were very concerning and the next 48 hours will be critical in terms of his care,” the statement said. “We’re still not on a clear path to a full recovery.”

Conley also said the President is currently not on supplemental oxygen, and is not currently having difficulty breathing or walking around the White House medical unit. He stressed that the President’s admittance to the hospital was a “precautionary measure to provide state of the art monitoring and any care that he may need.”

But Conley dodged questions about whether Trump was ever on supplemental oxygen during the illness, only saying that he was not on oxygen Thursday and “while we were all here, he was not on oxygen,” on Friday. The Associated Press and the New York Times reported shortly after the Saturday briefing that the President received supplemental oxygen while in the White House on Friday, before he was flown to the hospital.

A member of the medical team said the President was given the experimental antiviral drug remdesivir Friday night, and the team plans on giving him a five day treatment course. (The FDA has authorized the use of remdesivir on hospitalized COVID-19 patients with mild to moderate symptoms.) When asked if the President would complete the course of treatment at the hospital, Conley said the President would leave the hospital when the team agrees it’s “safe and appropriate.”

The team also said the President received an experimental drug treatment of “antibody therapy” 48 hour ago, and

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White House physician to give update on Trump’s condition after COVID diagnosis

White House physician Dr, Sean Conley will give an update on President Trump’s condition on Saturday, a day after Trump tested positive for COVID-19 and was moved to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center.

Conley will give the update at 11 a.m. outside Walter Reed, where President Trump was moved on Friday “out of an abundance of caution,” according to the White House. It had previously described the president’s symptoms as “mild.”

TRUMP TWEETS FROM HOSPITAL AS DOC CONFIRMS REMDESIVIR TREATMENT 

Prior to moving to Walter Reed, on Friday afternoon, Dr. Sean P. Conley, the president’s physician, released an update on the president’s condition.

“Following PCR-confirmation of the President’s diagnosis, as a precautionary measure he received a single 8-gram dose of Regeneron’s polyclonal antibody cocktail,” a memo released Friday afternoon by Dr. Sean P. Conley, the president’s physician stated. “He completed the infusion without incident.”

“In addition to the polyclonal antibodies, the President has been taking zinc, Vitamin D, famotidine, melatonin and a daily aspirin,” Conley said.

Later Friday, Conley said Trump was “doing very well” and was taking Remdesivir.

“He has completed his first dose and is resting comfortably,” he said.

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Trump, meanwhile, tweeted out similar sentiments.

“Going well, I think!,” the president wrote shortly after 11:30 p.m. ET. “Thank you to all. LOVE!!!”

Fox News’ Brooke Singman and Dom Calicchio contributed to this report.

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