Italian yacht builder teams up with Hong Kong interior designers to create bespoke “floating villas” for wealthy Asians



a view of a city next to a body of water: Aerial view of the Marina Club in Discovery Bay in Lantau, where the developer has pledged to turn its marina into “Hong Kong's most exclusive” superyacht club. Photo: Roy Issa


© SCMP
Aerial view of the Marina Club in Discovery Bay in Lantau, where the developer has pledged to turn its marina into “Hong Kong’s most exclusive” superyacht club. Photo: Roy Issa

An Italian luxury yacht builder has partnered with Hong Kong-based interior designers to create new bespoke “floating villas” targeting the wealthy in Hong Kong and Asia looking for an alternative form of holiday homes.

In an attempt to attract more buyers, the builder Sanlorenzo will be working with Hong Kong-based Steve Leung Designers to infuse luxury residential designs into the compact space of a yacht in an attempt to redefine and elevate the lifestyle among the region’s millionaires.

The new partnership will bring Leung and his team’s expertise to the rest of Sanlorenzo’s range of yachts through their “design to measure” style, according to Sanlorenzo, a shipbuilder founded in 1958 and based in Ameglia in northern Liguria region.

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“Yacht design has long been dominated by a Western lifestyle approach, which is very different from the way we live in Asia, especially in China,” said Leung, an architect and interior designer whose firm was engaged in the Novotel City project in Tung Chung and the Orchard Residences luxury apartments in Singapore, among others.



a man wearing a suit and tie talking on a cell phone: Hong Kong architect and interior designer Steve Leung is teaming up with Italian yacht builder to create


© Provided by South China Morning Post
Hong Kong architect and interior designer Steve Leung is teaming up with Italian yacht builder to create

Simpson Marine Group, which represents Sanlorenzo in the regional yacht markets, has doubled its sales in Asia this year, including nine yachts by the Italian builder in Hong Kong. They contributed more than 60 per cent of the group turnover, according to its managing director Mike Simpson.

The pickup suggests the economic crisis from the Covid-19 pandemic has not done much damage to the wealth of the richer segment of the population. The number of millionaires in Hong Kong rose 22 per cent this year, while China’s billionaires have this year rebuilt their net worth to the size of the Russian economy amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Leung has previously designed the interiors for Sanlorenzo’s SX88 yacht, which measures 27m in length with four cabins with en suite bathrooms. It features a flybridge with barbecue facilities, while the indoor area has a traditional Chinese round-table dining area.



a boat sitting on top of a table: An interior of Sanlorenzo's SX88 yacht. Photo: Steve Leung Designers


© Provided by South China Morning Post
An interior of Sanlorenzo’s SX88 yacht. Photo: Steve Leung Designers

“During the entire design process of shaping a villa-like yacht, we reimagined the spatial configuration of the yacht based on the owner’s lifestyle, utilising the yacht mainly as a ‘floating space’ for social entertainment,” said Leung. “We also added a subtle Asian touch, especially in the seating zone of the living and the dining rooms, ensuring a comfortable capacity for big groups’ gatherings.”

Leung hopes the venture can establish another new take on the yacht design by integrating international lifestyle with local cultural features, to attend to local tastes.

The price

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Interior designers reveal how to get the ‘show home’ look

Viewing a show home not only gives potential homebuyers plenty of interior design inspiration, but for those considering buying an off-plan property, it enables them to visualise what their future home could look like.



a living room filled with furniture and a fire place: Interior designers reveal how to get the 'show home' look with some secret tips and tricks, including colour coordination, floor to ceiling curtains, and something unexpected.


© Haus Interiors
Interior designers reveal how to get the ‘show home’ look with some secret tips and tricks, including colour coordination, floor to ceiling curtains, and something unexpected.

Show homes are often well coordinated and kitted out with luxe furnishings and high-end appliances. There’s always a strong theme and design direction which runs throughout. There could be light neutrals on the main walls and a stronger colour on one feature wall in a room or hallway, which is then echoed as an accent colour throughout the home in artwork, cushions or bedlinen. In a typical open plan living space, you may find floor lamps in corners and lots of luscious houseplants to soften corners and introduce greenery.

UK homebuilder, CALA Homes, works with an expert team of interior designers across the UK to create aspirational show homes with added wow factor. Here, a panel of interior design experts share some of their show home secrets to help create that professional look in our own homes.

What’s the secret to show home styling like a pro?

‘Focus on colour coordination, balance and a smooth harmonious flow from room to room. Although each space should always have its own “wow” such as an amazing light or a favourite print, try to keep a “thread” of connection between all the spaces,’ explains Eileen Kesson at Envision Showhomes. ‘Personally, I am a huge wallpaper fan – a fabulous on-trend wallpaper can add instant pizazz and lift a room in an afternoon!’



a dining room table: Natural Luxe Home Decoration Ideas


© Mark Scott
Natural Luxe Home Decoration Ideas

Pat Nightgale at Blocc Ltd, adds: Create a focal point in each room. Something that draws the eye. It could be a piece of artwork, a mirror, cushions or a light fitting. Something unexpected, and sensational! A brightly coloured rug in a neutral room, or wallpaper the ceiling! Something that introduces character and real style.’

Jon Piling at Abode says curtains can make the biggest impact. ‘For us, the big trick that everyone misses are curtains, they can make or break an interior scheme,’ he reveals. ‘Typically we would always try and go for wall to wall, floor to ceiling wave headed curtains to make the room look wider and taller – after all, who wouldn’t want that in their home?!’

But Felicity Stevens at Haus Interiors reminds us that not every design decision has to be so noticeable. ‘Creating a memorable experience is imperative, and impact does not always have to be obvious,’ she says. ‘We always consider the basic senses of sight, scent and touch. Sight – a well-balanced interior that is pleasing on the eye; scent – selecting a scent that creates a memorable experience; touch – using layers of texture so that the interior is interesting to touch.’



a living room filled with furniture and a large window: The Larfield, Aspen Park, Blocc Interiors


© Blocc Interiors
The Larfield, Aspen Park,

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Interior designers Reveal Secrets To Show Home Styling Like A Pro

Viewing a show home not only gives potential homebuyers plenty of interior design inspiration, but for those considering buying an off-plan property, it enables them to visualise what their future home could look like.

Show homes are often well coordinated and kitted out with luxe furnishings and high-end appliances. There’s always a strong theme and design direction which runs throughout. There could be light neutrals on the main walls and a stronger colour on one feature wall in a room or hallway, which is then echoed as an accent colour throughout the home in artwork, cushions or bedlinen. In a typical open plan living space, you may find floor lamps in corners and lots of luscious houseplants to soften corners and introduce greenery.

UK homebuilder, CALA Homes, works with an expert team of interior designers across the UK to create aspirational show homes with added wow factor. Here, a panel of interior design experts share some of their show home secrets to help create that professional look in our own homes.

What’s the secret to show home styling like a pro?

‘Focus on colour coordination, balance and a smooth harmonious flow from room to room. Although each space should always have its own “wow” such as an amazing light or a favourite print, try to keep a “thread” of connection between all the spaces,’ explains Eileen Kesson at Envision Showhomes. ‘Personally, I am a huge wallpaper fan – a fabulous on-trend wallpaper can add instant pizazz and lift a room in an afternoon!’

natural luxe home decoration ideas

Mark Scott

Pat Nightgale at Blocc Ltd, adds: Create a focal point in each room. Something that draws the eye. It could be a piece of artwork, a mirror, cushions or a light fitting. Something unexpected, and sensational! A brightly coloured rug in a neutral room, or wallpaper the ceiling! Something that introduces character and real style.’

Jon Piling at Abode says curtains can make the biggest impact. ‘For us, the big trick that everyone misses are curtains, they can make or break an interior scheme,’ he reveals. ‘Typically we would always try and go for wall to wall, floor to ceiling wave headed curtains to make the room look wider and taller – after all, who wouldn’t want that in their home?!’

But Felicity Stevens at Haus Interiors reminds us that not every design decision has to be so noticeable. ‘Creating a memorable experience is imperative, and impact does not always have to be obvious,’ she says. ‘We always consider the basic senses of sight, scent and touch. Sight – a well-balanced interior that is pleasing on the eye; scent – selecting a scent that creates a memorable experience; touch – using layers of texture so that the interior is interesting to touch.’

show home aspen park larfield kitchen dining room by blocc interiors
The Larfield, Aspen Park, Blocc Interiors

Blocc Interiors

Working with a blank canvas? Design advice for your new home

Be methodical about how you are going to live in your new home and plan your space, room by room, says Felicity. Pat

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Designers reimagine New England ski house decor to create a modern ‘man cave’ up north

Josh E. Linder and Thomas Henry Egan III liken reaching Rangeley, Maine, to a trek to the North Pole. The designers, principals of Boston-based Evolve Residential, drove up in Linder’s hybrid right before the pandemic to install the finishing touches on a client’s new home. “It was a long, slow ascent up a mountain on black ice with fresh powder on top,” Linder said. “We didn’t see any other cars, just a tractor carrying logs barreling at us.”



a living room filled with furniture and a fireplace: evolve-residential-rangeley-maine-mudroom


© Sean Litchfield
evolve-residential-rangeley-maine-mudroom

It turns out there is a less precarious route; reassuring given the region gets an annual snowfall of 200-plus inches. Linder and Egan’s clients, a Cambridge family of five, purchased the four-bedroom home last year, primarily to take advantage of the snowmobiling trails that crisscross the area, which also boasts a series of lakes. “The views are showstopping,” Egan said. “There are towering pines, and everything is covered in snow.”

The house, however, was nothing special. Although nestled in the trees on a hill, the structure itself was essentially charmless. “It was a 1980s developer house in the most pristine natural setting,” Linder said. The first step was to remove the unsightly pressure-treated wood deck, which wrapped from front to back. To replace it, Egan designed a wide, covered front porch inspired by the Adirondack-style cottages that dot the area. “It needed a defining architectural feature,” he explained. “Now it looks homey and warm.”

The revamped façade, now stylish and welcoming, set the tone for the interior scheme. While the whole family convenes here from time to time, the husband, teenage sons, and their friends visit most often. The directive was that the rooms feel relaxed. The décor was not to echo that of the stylish summer home the firm designed for the family on Massachusetts’ South Coast. “We had to reinvent the concept of a ‘man cave,’ ” Egan said.

The question became how to infuse their signature vibrancy into spaces that felt laid back and approachable. “It had to be tamer overall — less colorful and not too primped,” Linder said. The solution was to embrace the color blue and lean into natural materials, including fir, birch, leather, and jute. “Navy can go in many directions, but at the end of the day, it’s a masculine color,” Egan said. “The house had to be comfortable for men from the moment they entered.”

Knowing everyone would enter from the side door, the designers turned the mudroom area into a cozy place to hang out. Two George Smith chairs that came from the wife’s parents are at the ready in front of a cast-iron wood stove against a new stacked-granite wall. The storage — baskets and hooks and a live-edge wood bench — happens behind them. “You can relax on the chairs while you warm your feet; it’s not just a repository for wet clothing and shoes,” Egan said.

In addition to dressing up the space with local stone and woodwork painted Benjamin Moore’s “Hale Navy,” the designers

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Designers reimagine N.E. ski house decor

Josh E. Linder and Thomas Henry Egan III liken reaching Rangeley, Maine, to a trek to the North Pole. The designers, principals of Boston-based Evolve Residential, drove up in Linder’s hybrid right before the pandemic to install the finishing touches on a client’s new home. “It was a long, slow ascent up a mountain on black ice with fresh powder on top,’’ Linder said. “We didn’t see any other cars, just a tractor-trailer carrying logs barreling at us.’’

It turns out there is a less precarious route; reassuring given the region gets an annual snowfall of 200-plus inches. Linder and Egan’s clients, a Cambridge family of five, purchased the four-bedroom home last year, primarily to take advantage of the snowmobiling trails that crisscross the area, which also boasts a series of lakes. “The views are showstopping,’’ Egan said. “There are towering pines, and everything is covered in snow.’’

The house, however, was nothing special. Although nestled in the trees on a hill, the structure itself was essentially charmless. “It was a 1980s developer house in the most pristine natural setting,’’ Linder said. The first step was to remove the unsightly pressure-treated wood deck, which wrapped from front to back. To replace it, Egan designed a wide, covered front porch inspired by the Adirondack-style cottages that dot the area. “It needed a defining architectural feature,’’ he explained. “Now it looks homey and warm.’’

The revamped façade, now stylish and welcoming, set the tone for the interior scheme. While the whole family convenes here from time to time, the husband, teenage sons, and their friends visit most often. The directive was that the rooms feel relaxed. The décor was not to echo that of the stylish summer home the firm designed for the family on Massachusetts’ South Coast. “We had to reinvent the concept of a ‘man cave,’ ’’ Egan said.

The question became how to infuse their signature vibrancy into spaces that felt laid back and approachable. “It had to be tamer overall — less colorful and not too primped,’’ Linder said. The solution was to embrace the color blue and lean into natural materials, including fir, birch, leather, and jute. “Navy can go in many directions, but at the end of the day, it’s a masculine color,’’ Egan said. “The house had to be comfortable for men from the moment they entered.’’

Knowing everyone would enter from the side door, the designers turned the mudroom area into a cozy place to hang out. Two George Smith chairs that came from the wife’s parents are at the ready in front of a cast-iron wood stove against a new stacked-granite wall. The storage — baskets and hooks and a live-edge wood bench — happens behind them. “You can relax on the chairs while you warm your feet; it’s not just a repository for wet clothing and shoes,’’ Egan said.

‘We had to reinvent the concept of a “man cave.” ‘ –– Thomas Henry Egan II

In addition to dressing up the

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Jaggad HQ interior designer’s property journey

Romy Dankner is an interior designer. Her business is Homeroom Studio.

Where do you live?

In Caulfield South, with my husband, Roy, daughter Maya, sons Nadav and Asher, and our little fur baby, Luna.

What do you love most about your home?

The kitchen and family room. We love to cook and entertain, and we all gravitate around the large island counter or sink into our sofa for nights around the log fireplace. It’s a space where we create so many memories.

Have you changed anything?

We extended the property by adding a main bedroom with a walk-in wardrobe and ensuite. We also added a home office and the kitchen and family room. Our family was growing, so the extra spaces were needed.

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Most memorable home you’ve lived in?

Our little apartment in Tel Aviv, Israel. It was a special time in our lives when we lived amid the hustle and bustle of the city and were within walking distance of the beach, shops and cafes. It was very small but had charm.

First foot on the property ladder?

After returning to Melbourne 17 years ago, I was determined to build for the first time. I wasn’t a designer then, but I have always been creative and in awe of the building process. We bought a block of land in Caulfield South, subdivided it and built our first townhouse.

Are you a keen or reluctant property buyer?

I always find purchasing property an emotional rollercoaster of patience, excitement, research (and many tears). But I love buying property and developing it. Watching these creations come to life is magic.

How many homes have you ever bought?

Five homes, which we have developed before moving on to our next adventure.

Highlights of your property journey?

The incredible amount of information I have learnt over the years. We have always built to sell, which has helped me understand what most people prefer, the areas to focus on and how to build on a budget.

The lowlights?

One of the builders went bankrupt during one of our builds. It was a tense time when trades stopped coming to work. Navigating this process was very stressful.

Tips for homebuyers?

Buy something you can add value to. Perhaps renovate a bathroom, change the layout to

create open spaces or add bedrooms. Not only will you inject your own creativity, if you

choose to sell, you are already one step in front.

Future property plans?

We have bought land and are building our “forever” home. Our kids are entering their teens

now, so our needs and wants have shifted. I have been loving the process using my creativity

to create something unique and beautiful. You can follow the build on Instagram, via #ivoryhousecaulfield

MORE: Mildura named among Australia’s hottest housing markets, alongside Bendigo

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Interior Designers Are Helping Businesses Reimagine Their Workspace

covid-19 workspace
Walled off: Glass or acrylic partitions in a workspace create a sense of separation that makes people feel safer. // Photograph courtesy of MarxModa

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to push businesses to reimagine their workspaces into more hygienic, socially distant environments, interior design professionals are busy helping metro Detroit companies transform offices, community areas, and more for a new age of working.

Whitney Marx, 33, CEO of MarxModa, a Michigan-based interior design business headquartered in Detroit that creates workspaces for commercial, healthcare, and small-business clients, among others, first saw a need for COVID-19 workspace redesigns in February, with the demand intensifying in March and remaining steady since.

“Best practices continue to evolve, and we continue to design for flexibility in the workplace,” she says. “We expect new information almost daily, so design with the ability to adapt is critical.”

Marx and her team of interior designers partner closely with clients to change or adjust their spaces to help employees feel safe at work. “The first clients we helped were the essential businesses, especially healthcare-related clients and organizations looking to set up temporary COVID-care facilities very quickly,” she explains.

MarxModa formed a focus group early on that included clients, manufacturers, experts, and some of its team members to discuss challenges created by the pandemic and possible solutions that space planning and design could offer. Since then, they have worked with hundreds of clients to implement these strategies as people have returned to work.

“We’ve tried to be a resource to help our clients sift through the noise and understand things like new space allocation requirements and density danger zones in their office,” Marx says. Critical locations for COVID-19 safety consideration include common areas where people gather, lobbies, elevators, kitchens, restrooms, and print areas.

Updates to floor plans to meet distancing recommendations, such as furniture reconfigurations to move people farther apart or change their orientation, have been common changes. Other popular additions to workstation layouts are clear glass or acrylic boundary screens for physical separation and psychological support. Demand for furniture and accessories that can be easily cleaned has increased as well.

But “one design does not fit all,” says Marx, who says her team is working with clients to understand the number of employees who want access to spaces at the same time. Determining capacity limits, defining “safe spaces,” and tapping into technology to track space utilization have helped MarxModa create custom designs.

Solutions are modified as new data on how the virus spreads emerges. “There was a big push in March for higher screens, panels, room dividers — any form of physical boundary that could be installed immediately within workplaces to help prevent the spread of the virus,” Marx says. “More recently, research has shown that while these physical boundaries can create a sense of safety psychologically and serve as good reminders to maintain physical distance, they don’t actually block airborne particles.”

Physical distancing, wearing masks, and regularly sanitizing high-touch surfaces are more effective for containing virus spread,

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It’s James Deakin versus licensed interior designers this time

The TV host offended some designers for working with an unlicensed decorator and then asking: ‘Do you really require a license or law for choosing fabrics, colors, and furniture?

Sometimes, there comes a necessary—if a little aggressive—conversation that shines a spotlight on a long brewing issue. Social media has certainly accelerated how we’ve pushed certain topics to the fore. 

The hot topic issue of the coming week—James Deakin being called out for working with a “decorator” instead of a licensed interior designer. He is certainly not the first person to do that, but as one of the more famous personalities, many designers felt it was an affront and an endorsement to hire non-licensed interior decorators.  

On Sunday, Oct. 4,  the TV host on Facebook defended his decision to work with YouTube vlogger Elle Uy, who has recently rounded up her followers to 700,000 strong, on his place.

Elle is not a licensed interior decorator, but is well known on YouTube and in social media for her budget decorating tips. 

James’ first post was of him sharing a photo of his living area, where he shared that Elle was helping him choose the valance for his curtains.

A poster, who shared Deakin’s post, but whose name has been blurred, reposted this post with this caption: “When someone like James Deakin promotes unlicensed practitioners, we should do something about it.”

Another one also wrote about how this “blatantly disregards the profession,” coming from a long line of what they perceive as attacks due to publications publishing DIY stories of home renovations this quarantine and how this can come off as saying that interior designers are not essential. One post ends with, “Our collective voices need to be heard. There is a law for interior design. RA 10350.”

RA 10350 is an act to regulate and modernize the practice of interior design in the country. 

This irked Deakins enough that he shared the posts and then gave a lengthy reply: 

“So I’ve just been called out in an interior design group by a licensed interior designer who demands something be done about me using an unlicensed decorator to help me arrange my furniture and hang prints on the wall…. This is targeted toward my decorator, a very popular online personality Elle Uy, who has been doing budget makeovers on her YouTube channel and presumably stealing all the love away from this person and her exclusive circle of entitlement.”

He continued: “The licensed designer waxed sentimental about the years of study she has done and pontificates about how these backyard internet decorators have no business telling people where to put their sofa or what colors they should choose, and feels very strongly that they should be called out.  She also cites the law, RA 10350, and wields it like a weapon to protect this sacred space that only people who have studied for can enjoy and share with others—for a price.”

Deakins then praised unlicensed “backyard, internet decorators”:

“To all those backyard,

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AMERICAN SOCIETY OF INTERIOR DESIGNERS LOOKS TO THE FUTURE OF DESIGN, INDUSTRY AND PROFESSION …

Washington, D.C., Oct. 01, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — As all industries tackle the ongoing effects of COVID-19, the American Society of Interior Designers ( ASID ) has sought to understand the resiliency of the design industry and profession through times of uncertainty. The 2020 ASID Interior Design Resiliency Report has released the results from its first phase, conducted during the summer of 2020 in partnership with Cosentino, Benjamin Moore and Emerald to further investigate interior design resilience by examining the impact of the pandemic, the response from the interior design community and the changes necessary in design to move forward. 

“In their day-to-day work, design professionals are creative problem-solvers who constantly strive to provide a positive, impactful experience,” explains ASID Director, Research and Knowledge Management Susan Chung, Ph.D. “We hope that in addition to helping us understand the changes and challenges that face the industry, this Resiliency Report demonstrates the value of design and contributions design professionals can make to help lead us into a safer and healthier world.”

Prior to this study, ASID had been tracking the impact of COVID-19 on the interior design community through pulse surveys, finding signs of resilience among the industry and profession. The Resiliency Report takes a deeper dive by examining attributes of interior design professionals, their experiences during the pandemic and expected changes in the design of the built environment. The study not only identifies issues interior design businesses and professionals have faced during this major disruption, but also tracks changes implemented in the industry, tests the viability of industry-wide changes and showcases the value of design. The study will be conducted in multiple phases, with this being the first, to better understand long-term resilience.

When surveying designers and other industry respondents, the study focused on areas including impact, response, changes in design and ways to build health and exercise resilience in the profession. Key findings include:

IMPACT

Regardless of age, gender, status, location, firm or experience, everyone has been affected by COVID-19. All respondents reported some level of impact on at least one of the five areas: life in general, country/city, firm, interior design industry/business and interior design education. Although general concern due to the impact of COVID-19 eased somewhat since its peak (March-April 2020), the majority of the interior design community still expresses high concerns (as measured in July 2020).

Impact is perceived as a collective and shared experience, and it is interconnected with personal and professional lives. Respondents’ lives are multifaceted and intricately woven with the external and larger society, and their social well-being was lowest during this time of physical distancing. 73 percent reported experiencing burnout in some frequency, having a major impact on personal well-being. 

RESPONSE

The design industry made necessary changes and adjustments, specifically focused on working remotely, technology, infrastructure, resources and support. Focus group participants reported different degrees of preparedness, with some undergoing a seamless transition and others facing a longer adjustment. Designers also navigated transitioning clients to a virtual working relationship. 

Designers collaborated to

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AMERICAN SOCIETY OF INTERIOR DESIGNERS LOOKS TO THE FUTURE OF DESIGN, INDUSTRY AND PROFESSION IN NEW RESILIENCY REPORT

In Partnership with Design Leaders Cosentino, Benjamin Moore and Emerald, Research Demonstrates the Effects of COVID-19 on Design Professionals and Spaces

Reported Level of Impact
Reported Level of Impact
Reported Level of Impact
Reported Business Preparedness
Reported Business Preparedness
Reported Business Preparedness

Washington, D.C., Oct. 01, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — As all industries tackle the ongoing effects of COVID-19, the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) has sought to understand the resiliency of the design industry and profession through times of uncertainty. The 2020 ASID Interior Design Resiliency Report has released the results from its first phase, conducted during the summer of 2020 in partnership with Cosentino, Benjamin Moore and Emerald to further investigate interior design resilience by examining the impact of the pandemic, the response from the interior design community and the changes necessary in design to move forward. 

“In their day-to-day work, design professionals are creative problem-solvers who constantly strive to provide a positive, impactful experience,” explains ASID Director, Research and Knowledge Management Susan Chung, Ph.D. “We hope that in addition to helping us understand the changes and challenges that face the industry, this Resiliency Report demonstrates the value of design and contributions design professionals can make to help lead us into a safer and healthier world.”

Prior to this study, ASID had been tracking the impact of COVID-19 on the interior design community through pulse surveys, finding signs of resilience among the industry and profession. The Resiliency Report takes a deeper dive by examining attributes of interior design professionals, their experiences during the pandemic and expected changes in the design of the built environment. The study not only identifies issues interior design businesses and professionals have faced during this major disruption, but also tracks changes implemented in the industry, tests the viability of industry-wide changes and showcases the value of design. The study will be conducted in multiple phases, with this being the first, to better understand long-term resilience.

When surveying designers and other industry respondents, the study focused on areas including impact, response, changes in design and ways to build health and exercise resilience in the profession. Key findings include:

IMPACT

Regardless of age, gender, status, location, firm or experience, everyone has been affected by COVID-19. All respondents reported some level of impact on at least one of the five areas: life in general, country/city, firm, interior design industry/business and interior design education. Although general concern due to the impact of COVID-19 eased somewhat since its peak (March-April 2020), the majority of the interior design community still expresses high concerns (as measured in July 2020).

Impact is perceived as a collective and shared experience, and it is interconnected with personal and professional lives. Respondents’ lives are multifaceted and intricately woven with the external and larger society, and their social well-being was lowest during this time of physical distancing. 73 percent reported experiencing burnout in some frequency, having a major impact on personal well-being. 

RESPONSE

The design industry made necessary changes and adjustments, specifically focused on working remotely, technology,

Read more