Mumbai Crime: Police constable booked for raping, cheating interior designer from Ghatkopar

The Mumbai police on Thursday registered an FIR against a 42-year-old police constable for allegedly raping and cheating a Ghatkopar-based interior designer. The incident came to light after the police received a written application that the accused had sexually assaulted the 40-year-old complainant on multiple occasions on the pretext of marrying her.

Speaking to Hindustan Times, senior inspector Suhas Kamble from Pant Nagar police station said, “We have registered the offence and are investigating the matter. The accused has not been arrested yet.”

Also Read: Woman files complaint against father for threatening her husband

Nearly a year ago, when the complainant delivered his child, the constable told her that he was already married. He also said that he could not marry her because if he did, the police department would sack him for consummating two marriages. In her complaint, the woman claimed that the accused told her that he would divorce his wife and marry her, but didn’t do so.

The woman alleged that the constable asked her not to disclose to anyone that the child is his and that it was a test tube baby. It was then that the woman approached the police. Police officials said that the constable also holds a post in Brihanmumbai Police Karmchari Pagardar Sahakari Patsanstha.

In her written statement to the police, the complainant said that she met the accused in 1998 while working at a private company in Andheri. Over time their friendship turned into love and he promised her that he would marry her.

“He also introduced her to two developers and asked her to undertake their interior decoration work. The accused used her expertise as a designer and earned money but didn’t pay her anything.” the complaint stated. The victim further alleged that the accused took money from her multiple times on various pretexts and owed her around Rs 87 lakh.

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The Pant Nagar police have booked the accused under Sections 376 (rape), 420 (cheating), 406 (punishment for criminal breach of trust), 323 (punishment for voluntarily causing hurt), 504 (intentional insult with intent to provoke breach of the peace) and 506 (punishment for criminal intimidation) of the Indian Penal Code (IPC).

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S.F. interior designer Jeff Schlarb conceptualizes penthouse in Nob Hill

A resplendent penthouse in Nob Hill awaits its next owner and showcases the vision of San Francisco-based interior designer Jeff Schlarb. Crowning the Crescent, the city’s newest collection of boutique residences, the three-bedroom, two-and-a-half-bathroom penthouse that’s listed for $7.1 million is an artistic, inspirational oasis with more than 1,800 square feet of living space and 925 square feet of exterior space, with views of the Transamerica Pyramid, San Francisco Bay and Coit Tower.

“My vision in designing the penthouse at Crescent was to imagine a resident feeling inspired every time they enter their home,” Schlarb said. “We kept drawing upon the idea of creating a custom, romantic space that feels exciting and familiar at the same time, straddling a careful balance of maximalism and softness while honoring the unparalleled architecture and world-class design of this one-of-a-kind building and its residences. The color palette, in particular, draws upon nature and complements the stunning sky and bay sightlines visible from terraces that span the home.”

Schlarb furnished and designed the elegant penthouse, which complements the building’s architecture and features a flowing floor plan awash in natural light. The refined interior embodies California lifestyle through its sophisticated, stylish material palette and thoughtful design scheme.

The Crescent is the work of Grosvenor Americas, which is part of the Grosvenor Group and one of the world’s largest privately-owned property companies.

“We are excited to debut this model penthouse at Crescent, which is an idyllic interpretation of a contemporary luxury retreat located in one of the world’s greatest neighborhoods,” said Steve Buster, Senior Vice President of Development for Grosvenor Americas. “The home is an indoor-outdoor top-floor oasis, as residents have a privately accessed sprawling rooftop terrace overlooking downtown San Francisco and the Bay, along with two private terraces immediately off the living spaces. Crescent’s model penthouse personifies the romance of San Francisco and embodies exceptional design by the inimitable Jeff Schlarb, who has masterfully complemented interiors by renowned Champalimaud Design, in a building featuring world-class architecture by celebrated Robert A.M. Stern Architects.”

The penthouse’s seamless indoor/outdoor flow includes a 527-square-foot roof terrace boasting striking views of downtown San Francisco, landmarks and the water.

Schlarb’s ethereal, sophisticated and sophisticated design blends a variety of soft blues, teals and neutral tones contrasted by gold, glass and brass accents.

The penthouse opens to a formal foyer and hallway with a gallery wall featuring a curated selection of artwork including UNTITLED, a painting by Christoph Schrein by Saatchi Art. Schlarb’s design studio curated a piece of artwork for the foyer as well.. Speckled wallpaper by Rebecca Atwood in cloud blue adorns the ceiling and serves as a backdrop for a dramatic Ro Sham Beaux hanging pendant lights.

The foyer segues to open living and dining rooms designed for a modern sense of West Coast living. The living area’s highlights include a dynamic wall covering by Philip Jeffries, a sleek white Bernhardt bench, matte white ceramic chandelier, a custom blue sofa by JSDS Custom and a vintage coffee table from 1stdibs.

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This Interior Designer Turned Her Cookie-Cutter Town House Into a Personal Art Gallery

“The biggest challenge was using what was already here but making it better,” says Tiffany (left). “This isn’t our forever home, so I had to be really smart about what I decided to spend money on and what just needed a small facelift. It’s way easier to bring your full vision to life without any restrictions, but the fun part is figuring it out with those limitations.”

“The biggest challenge was using what was already here but making it better,” says Tiffany (left). “This isn’t our forever home, so I had to be really smart about what I decided to spend money on and what just needed a small facelift. It’s way easier to bring your full vision to life without any restrictions, but the fun part is figuring it out with those limitations.”

When interior designer Tiffany Thompson bought this two-bedroom Portland, Oregon, town house in 2016, she was working at Nike and viewed its close proximity to the company’s headquarters as a major benefit. It also didn’t hurt that she had access to a community pool and tennis court, or that the drive toward her street was lined with towering trees. But the deciding factor, Tiffany remembers, is that it had a certain Pacific Northwest luxury. “What initially drew me to this place was the amount of natural light it received. It’s pretty bright all of the time,” Tiffany says. “Coming from Miami where it’s usually sunny, the thing that scared me most about purchasing a home in Portland was that it was going to be dark and rainy seven months out of the year.”

The challenge would be turning this cookie-cutter town house into a personalized haven. Tiffany was surrounded by a blank canvas. Luckily, her boyfriend, Julian Gaines, is a fine artist. “With all of the art, we want to evoke emotion and really let them be the highlight of our home,” she says. “Being with an artist is amazing because I have endless items to choose from.”

“For the dining room art, Julian imagined himself being next in line on his way to heaven and seeing the person in front of him receiving his halo,” she says. The table is from Lillian August, and the surrounding chairs are from Design Within Reach. The Studio Eero Aarnio Mini Pony Chair in the corner was found at Finnish Design Shop.
“For the dining room art, Julian imagined himself being next in line on his way to heaven and seeing the person in front of him receiving his halo,” she says. The table is from Lillian August, and the surrounding chairs are from Design Within Reach. The Studio Eero Aarnio Mini Pony Chair in the corner was found at Finnish Design Shop.

Tiffany couldn’t touch the exterior or overhaul its interior, thanks to a homeowners’ association and a limited budget, but she could reimagine its white walls. She pictured a theme of timeless and cozy beauty, punctuated by details that were functional yet exciting upon a closer glance. Tiffany considered her canvas for a year, figuring that it was best to take her time on “making this home feel like me.” And when she was ready, she landed primarily on a black-and-white palette. “It’s amazing how these two colors bring a sense of balance to a space,” Tiffany says. “There’s also so much greenery outside that the black-and-white palette grounded my home and makes the backdrop of the outdoors feel and look even more intense.”

“These types of homes have exteriors that all look alike, so it was important for me to have some features that were our own and fun,” Tiffany says. The accent wall is made of one-and-three-fourths inch oak slats that were nailed to the wall in one-inch gaps. The entire project was painted in Tricorn Black by Sherwin-Williams. The coffee table and floor lamp are from CB2, and the chrome Wassily side chairs were found on Chairish. The framed artwork was created by Julian and the masks are vintage.
“These types of homes have exteriors that all look alike, so it was important for me to have some features that were our own and fun,” Tiffany says. The accent wall is made of one-and-three-fourths inch oak slats that were nailed to the wall in one-inch gaps. The entire project was
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Constable booked for raping, cheating interior designer from Mumbai





© Provided by Hindustan Times


Pant Nagar police on Thursday registered a first information report (FIR) against a 42-year-old police constable for allegedly raping a Ghatkopar-based interior designer.

Senior inspector Suhas Kamble from Pant Nagar police station said, “We have registered the offence and are investigating the matter. The accused has not been arrested yet.”

The case was registered after the police received a written application that the accused had sexually assaulted the 40-year-old complainant on multiple occasions on the pretext of marrying her. A year ago, she delivered his child. It was then that the constable told her that he was already married. He also said he could not marry her because if he did, the police department would sack him for consummating two marriages. He then told her that he would divorce his wife and marry her, but didn’t do so, her complaint to the police stated.

He also asked her not to disclose to anyone that the child is his and that it was a test tube baby. The woman then approached the police.

The constable also holds a post in Brihanmumbai Police Karmchari Pagardar Sahakari Patsanstha. In her statement, the complainant said she met the accused in 1998 while working at a private company in Andheri. Over time their friendship turned into love and he promised her that he would marry her.

“He also introduced her to two developers and asked her to undertake their interior decoration work. The accused used her expertise as a designer and earned money but didn’t pay her anything,” stated the complaint.

Her statement further alleged that the accused took money from her multiple times on various pretexts and owed her around Rs87 lakh.

The accused has been booked under sections 376 (rape), 420 (cheating), 406 (punishment for criminal breach of trust), 323 (punishment for voluntarily causing hurt), 504 (intentional insult with intent to provoke breach of the peace) and 506 (punishment for criminal intimidation) of the Indian Penal Code.

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Fashion designer dies, Cleveland Browns attendance upped, White House cases, more – coronavirus timeline Oct. 3-9

CLEVELAND, Ohio – Here is our regular roundup of coronavirus facts, figures and numbers regarding Cleveland, Ohio, the United States and the world Oct. 3-9:

Oct. 3: CNN says only three states – Texas, Missouri and South Carolina – are reporting a decline in new cases compared to last week, as the country hit its highest daily rate in almost two months. Twenty-one states report an increase in cases. Chris Christie, former New Jersey governor and aide to President Trump, announces he tested positive. He joins several other prominent figures who tested positive, including Kellyanne Conway and Ronna McDaniel, chairwoman of the Republican National Committee. CBS News reports that the California governor’s office, in a Tweet, suggests restaurant-goers keep their masks on “in between bites.”

Oct. 4: Trump leaves the hospital and takes a ride with Secret Service members, drawing criticism for leaving a quarantined and controlled health environment. The Ohio Investigative Unit cites Barley House in Cleveland for violations regarding sales for on-premises alcoholic consumption. Club Paradis in Cleveland receives an administrative citation for improper conduct and limitation on hours for on-premises consumption. Kenzo Takada, founder of the French luxury fashion house Kenzo, dies of coronavirus. He was 81.

Oct. 5: After seeing high infection rates, officials in Paris say bars will be shut down again today. The Ohio health department allows the Cleveland Browns to double spectators to 12,000 at FirstEnergy Stadium. For the first two home games, the Browns received an exemption on the coronavirus gathering limit and were allowed 6,000 fans in the stadium. Ohio reports 1,057 new coronavirus cases, with the total approaching 160,000. Deaths are at 4,931. Cleveland has 36 new cases. So far, 1 in 73 Ohioans are known to have contracted Covid. Dr. Mike Ryan, director of the World Health Organization’s Health Emergencies Program, says about 10% of the world’s population has had the virus. That translates to about 760 million people. President Trump, upon his release from the hospital, says: “Don’t let it (coronavirus) dominate you.” White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany (photo above, bottom right) says she has tested positive.

Oct. 6: Trump policy adviser Stephen Miller announces he has tested positive. Dr. Anthony Fauci says if health precautions are not followed, the United States could hit 400,000 deaths by winter. Kent State University will ask 450 random students to be tested weekly and partner with CVS. Kent campus reported 40 new cases for the week of Sept. 27.

Oct. 7: Half the U.S. states are reporting increases in Covid cases. Iranian state television reports 239 fatalities, a record number of daily deaths for the country of more than 80 million people. Ohio has 1,424 new virus cases. In all, 162,723 people have had coronavirus. The number of deaths increase 23 to 4,970. Cleveland’s Department of Public Health says it has not identified any more coronavirus infections while conducting contact tracing on 11 positive cases linked to the presidential debate in Cleveland. None of the 11 people who tested positive

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Transgender interior designer Felycya Harris shot to death in Georgia park / LGBTQ Nation

Felycya Harris

Felycya HarrisPhoto: Facebook

A 33-year-old transgender interior designer was found shot to death this past Saturday in Augusta, Georgia.

Felycya Harris’s body was found after 1 p.m. at a city park with one gunshot wound. An autopsy on Monday classified her death as a homicide.

Related: US Marine who murdered a transgender woman was just pardoned

“I went outside and we were just sitting in the car, laughing and talking and jiving on each other” before her death, her friend Ricola Collier told WRDW.

She is the 31st known transgender or non-binary person killed this year in the U.S., according to HRC, in what has become one of the most violent years on record for transgender people. The number is believed to be higher as many murders are not reported in the media and many victims who are transgender or non-binary are misgendered in media reports.

Most of the victims this year have been Black and latina transgender women.

“With news of the death of Felycya Harris, we have hit a grim milestone: we have now matched the highest number of transgender or gender non-conforming people who were victims of fatal violence in one year – and there are three more months left in the year,” said HRC President Alphonso David.

According to the organization, Harris ran her own interior decorating business and said she could do “just about anything with decorating” to make people feel better in their living spaces. She also worked at a furniture store and taught dance.

Her friends said they will remember her “laugh. The smile – the smiles. The talks. The arguments. The attitudes. Everybody is going to remember who Felycya Harris is.”

According to the Augusta Chronicle, friends and family are sharing “Justice for Felycya” posts on Facebook. Police have not yet said if they have a suspect.

At least two other transgender women were murdered in the past two weeks. Mia Green, 29, of Philadelphia, Louisiana was found shot in the neck on September 28 and later died at the hospital.

Abdullah Ibn El-Amin Jaamia, in whose car Green’s body was found, has been arrested in connection to her death.

In Los Angeles, 42-year-old Daniela Hernandez was stabbed in the throat Sunday night after she was surrounded by a group of men in a park who told her “something to the effect of, ‘We don’t want gays in the park,’” according to LAPD.

“We don’t know exactly why, but we know it was simply because she’s trans,” said TransLatina Coalition President and CEO Bamby Salcedo.

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Learn How Interior Designer Kristin Corley Revamped Her Career With an Executive MBA.

Kristin Corley, Auburn Executive MBA, Class of 2008. Photo via Nathan Watson for Bham Now

For working professionals wanting to boost their careers, an executive MBA allows you to learn valuable business skills without interrupting your career or personal life. Just ask Kristin Corley, a local professional who transformed her interior design career with the skills and knowledge earned through the Auburn Executive MBA program.

What is an Executive MBA?

Photo via Auburn Harbert School of Business on Facebook

A Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree is designed to help graduates better understand the ways a business functions. An MBA is an incredibly versatile degree that gives you the knowledge and confidence to make information based, budget-related decisions regardless of job title or business model. 

But for many working professionals, an MBA—with its two-year, full-time class schedule—simply isn’t feasible. That’s where an Executive MBA shines.

Tailored to professionals with eight or more years of progressive experience, the Auburn Executive MBA program utilizes the significant knowledge and experience of students to ground business principles and theory with examples of real-world application. The program blends intensive residencies with distance courses for the best of both worlds—classroom instruction that provides interaction with faculty and peers and online learning that offers the flexibility to balance career, family and rigorous education. This delivery model binds students into a tight-knit cohort that later becomes a professional network offering benefits long after graduation. 

Kristin Corley, 2008 Auburn EMBA graduate

Kristin outside her office at BL Harbert International. Photo via Nathan Watson for Bham Now

To learn more about Auburn’s EMBA program, we spoke with alumnus Kristin Corley, Class of 2008. Prior to pursuing an EMBA, Kristin graduated from Auburn with a degree in interior design. After working several years in a local firm, Kristin realized that expanding her understanding of business strategy and finance would be helpful in her career. So she began looking for a program that could help fill that gap in her skill set.

For Kristin, the Auburn EMBA program checked all the boxes. At the time, she was balancing her work schedule and taking care of her four-year-old, so a traditional program was out of the question.

How did the Auburn EMBA fit in with your work schedule?

Kristin: “Auburn’s EMBA program is perfectly tailored for people in my situation—working professionals that don’t have the time capacity for standard classes. That flexibility allowed me to work on class projects on Saturday mornings, rather than trying to find time to be in a classroom each day. And since the program is online, it didn’t require students to be in the area. In fact, I believe only three people in my class actually lived in Alabama.”

Kristin Corley in her office at BL Harbert International. Photo via Nathan Watson for Bham Now

For Kristin, one of her most valuable takeaways was the improvement of her communication skills. The Auburn EMBA taught Kristin how to

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AAA offers Experienced Interior Designer Pathway

The Alberta Association of Architects (AAA) has created the Experienced Interior Designer Pathway (EIDP) to allow interior designers with extensive experience to become Licensed Interior Designers with the AAA under the Alberta Architects Act.

This alternative to the Intern Interior Designer Program is meant to serve the needs of many of Alberta’s interior designers who meet the current requirements and who can illustrate their competency, but who have not previously logged their hours with AAA. The EIDP is a temporary pathway expected to close in 2024.

“The development of this pathway represents many months of work by our dedicated committees and council in arriving at a rigorous and fair method to establish competency. We are so delighted to announce the launch of the EIDP and look forward to welcoming new members to the AAA,” says council member and chair of the interior design advisory committee Donna Assaly.

Benefits of becoming a Licensed Interior Designer include the right to practice the regulated scope of interior design in Alberta and the ability to engage in the activities of the association, including the opportunity to sit on AAA Council and help shape the future of the professions.

This is a significant occurrence, following years of advocacy and discussions between the AAA and Interior Designers of Alberta.

Alberta has a rigorous licensing structure for Licensed Interior Designers in accordance with the Architects Act. Under the Act, Licensed Interior Designers may provide the same services as an architect, except on all matters that affect the exterior shell of a building, environmental separations and exits.

They are qualified by relevant post-secondary education, completion of the international NCIDQ examination, years of supervised work experience, ongoing mandatory professional development and adherence to high professional standards and codes of conduct.

For more information about the EIDP, prerequisites and the application process, please visit the EIDP.

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Sea Island Luxury Interior Designer, VPI Design, Discusses the Art of Lighting

Press release content from Accesswire. The AP news staff was not involved in its creation.

Top Luxury Interior Designer, VPI Design by Dina Varner, explains how the selection of lighting design can serve as an artistic element to enhance the beauty of a room

SEA ISLAND, GA / ACCESSWIRE / October 1, 2020 / The choice of lighting in a space is often underestimated; lighting can be viewed as an artistic element rather than a practical accessory. Sea Island Luxury Interior Designer, VPI Design, chooses lighting to complement the features of the rooms’ design. Lighting creates an elegant style and enhances the architectural features of a room.

Lighting is a focal aesthetic feature where the goal of its composition and positioning is to highlight and enhance other features in the space. A careful and informed selection of lighting creates the difference between functionality and art. Luxurious lighting installations captivate viewers by the ambiance this creates.

Levels of lighting assist in creating and emphasizing the mood of a room. Using different forms of lighting such as chandeliers, sconces, and lamps creates a balance.

Ambient lighting is positioned in areas of the room to soften the mood and create a comforting and stylish feel for the space. The spaces where fixtures are installed are carefully and strategically positioned to attract the attention to artwork, sculptures, wallpaper designs, or intricate details of the room. Task lighting is artistically created in areas that require additional lighting to brighten the specific space. This layer of lighting is carefully balanced to allow efficiency as well as adding to the luxurious atmospheric feel of the space.

Creating a sufficient balance between luxurious and functional space relies primarily on the art of lighting. Fabricating a room or space that feels sophisticated and stylish requires the right combination of lighting elements. Therefore, lighting design is an artistic focal point that directs the viewer’s attention to other features in the space.

About VPI Design by Dina Varner

Dina Varner is founder and creative director of VPI Design, an Atlanta and Sea Island Interior Design Firm working with both residential and commercial clients. She and her husband have been in the commercial construction industry for many years. Her inspiration comes from over twenty-five years of collecting and selling art and antiques through venues like Sotheby’s, Babcock Gallery, and Christie’s. This love of art and antiques started as a passion and has evolved into a successful business. Dina’s rich southern heritage in addition to her love of fashion and travel also act as her creative influence. The VPI Design team work together with a distinct flair for aesthetic insight into unique designs exhibiting elegance and style. They explore the use of light and texture for an organic appealing experience in every timeless interior. Combinations of art deco, vintage, and contemporary styles are combined to create elegance while simultaneously exuding simplicity and comfort in each living space. Her designers enjoy getting to know their clients personally to create

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Award-winning Chattanooga designer offers tips on creating your dream kitchen

When Jackie Howard gets a call for one of her award-winning kitchen designs, her first thought is, “Please, not another white kitchen.”

The founder and owner of Scarlett’s Cabinetry, Howard has spent more than 30 years making clients’ dreams for their home come true. Her designs garnered her the title of “Best of the Best” in this year’s people’s choice awards by the Chattanooga Times Free Press.

Howard has seen countless trends come and go — like white kitchens, which have endured since the 1920s, when white was about the only color on offer. The country had just come out of the Spanish flu pandemic and a gleaming white kitchen was associated with sterilization, a huge selling point at the time.

Today’s crisp white kitchens can speak of cleanliness or homeyness, elegance or minimalism. In a word, they remain timeless.

“White kitchens still sell homes,” Howard says.

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Award-winning Chattanooga offers tips for designing your kitchen

But today’s kitchens are no longer sequestered at the back of the house, tucked behind swinging doors and walls. They are the heart of the home both literally and figuratively. As such, Howard works to blend them into their surroundings, creating a seamless flow in the open, shared living spaces preferred today.

“Kitchens being open to the living space, you want to look in there and be happy. You want it to look like the rest of the space,” she says. “If you’ve got a lot of contrasting colors — even grays and whites — it screams ‘kitchen.'”

Here, Howard shares three of her kitchen designs and what they can teach us.

*****

“I think the biggest compliment of this kitchen is when you walk in you really have to look for the kitchen. Each piece is like a fine piece of furniture.”

This kitchen, designed for a family of five on Signal Mountain, channels an Old World French vibe.

“You can obviously tell she wants that warm, cozy, lived-in kitchen feel,” says Howard.

But some of the most important details from her rigorous client interview process aren’t necessarily about aesthetics, but whether a family cooks together, who cooks most often, even the height of the most prominent cook. This knowledge helps her determine spacing, placement and flow.

There’s no need for a pantry.

“A lot of people are scared of giving up a walk-in pantry,” Howard says, though she recommends maximizing every square inch by opting for drawers and slide-out cupboards.

Drawers offer seamless storage, both aesthetically and practically.

“You want everything at your hands … [so] anytime you can put a set of drawers instead of cabinets or pulls [I recommend it],” she says, adding, “We know now that, except for a big stockpot, everything can go in a drawer.” Instead, keep those big stockpots in a cabinet above the fridge.

Ceiling-height cabinets are handy, even if they’re not the most accessible.

“A lot of clients had cabinets that did not go to the ceiling,” says Howard. “What’s

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