BBC – Homes – Design


Red, yellow and green rooms

Colour has always been important – from natural warnings in primitive times to mood enhancers in modern homes.

Ever since man understood fiery red meant danger and those purple berries were poisonous, colour has been associated with moods and feelings.

Religious artists used colour as a form of shorthand – people looking at a stained glass window or a heraldic coat of arms would have instantly known blue equalled contemplative faith or green meant hope. Even saints were associated with different colours.

The colours used to decorate rooms in a house can affect the occupants’ moods. Find out why:

Red

Associated with: danger, passion, energy, warmth, adventure, optimism
Best for: dining rooms as it promotes sociable and lively feelings, and stimulates the appetite
Pitfalls: it can be overpowering and lead to headaches. Either vary the shade, paint one wall red, or use it for accessories only. Don’t use red in a baby’s room
Red room
Red rooms

Pink

Associated with: love
Best for: bedrooms as it can be peaceful and restful. A hot fuchsia can introduce passion
Pitfalls: can be appear to be very girlie and sickly sweet. To counteract this, introduce hints of dark charcoal or black
Pink room
Pink rooms

Orange

Associated with: stability, reassurance, warmth, and is thought to aid digestion
Best for: living and dining rooms
Pitfalls: might keep the occupant awake when used in a bedroom. It can make a room look smaller because it’s an advancing colour, so make sure the room gets plenty of light
Orange room
Orange rooms

Green

Associated with: nature and energy, calming and restful, balance (halfway between red and blue) security, stability
Best for: bedrooms, living rooms
Pitfalls: too much green is thought to make people too complacent or too laid back. Inject some red or orange to counteract these feelings
Green room
Green rooms

Blue

Associated with: calming and soothing; promotes intellectual thought; believed to keep hunger at bay; loyalty, serenity, authority, protection, contemplative, prevents nightmares
Best for: bedrooms, bathrooms, studies
Pitfalls: can look cold and unwelcoming. Make sure it doesn’t look too chilly by choosing a blue with a warm undertone
Blue room
Blue rooms

Yellow

Associated with: sunshine and energy, stimulates the intellect
Best for: kitchens, dining rooms or north-facing rooms
Pitfalls: not very restful for a bedroom. Yellow is thought to enhance feelings of emotional distress
Yellow room
Yellow rooms

Lilac

Associated with: spiritual matters – suggests the misty area between the sky and heaven, feminine
Best for: bedrooms and bathrooms to create a stress-free sanctuary
Pitfalls: can be insipid. Liven it up with black or silver, or both
Lilac room
Lilac rooms

Purple

Associated with: creativity, fertility, joy, but also magic, evil, death and sex
Best for: bedrooms
Pitfalls: can be overpowering
Purple room
Purple rooms

Brown

Associated with: security, stability and very practical
Best for: living rooms
Pitfalls: introduce a livelier colour for mental stimulation such as green or blue
Brown room
Brown rooms

Black

Associated with: death, eccentricity, drama. It’s a non-colour that absorbs colour and reflects nothing back
Best for: using in moderation
Pitfalls:

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12 Design Tips To Make A Small Bathroom Better

Charmean Neithart, Houzz Contributor

If you have a super small bathroom, trying to make everything fit in the available space is like doing a giant crossword puzzle.

Among the challenges: configuring the toilet and sink to code, allowing enough clearance for a shower and, of course, where to put the towels and t.p. Despite the challenges, in most cases it’s still better to squeeze in an extra bathroom where one is desperately needed, even if it must be small. If you plan on going this route, here are 12 tips for designing that picture-perfect small bathroom.

10 Tiny Homes That Live Large

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1. Install a corner sink. Sometimes even a pedestal sink can disrupt the only available traffic lane in a bathroom.

In this case placing a corner sink across from the toilet works better than a sink across from the shower. The opening and closing of the shower door usually creates an awkward walk-around condition.

2. Use a shower curtain. A shower curtain that moves back and forth saves space over a glass door that moves in and out. Shower-tub combos actually can fit into small spaces, with some tubs coming in at 60 inches in length.

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3. Float the vanity. Besides just visually helping the bathroom appear bigger, mounting a vanity above the floor frees up a little space for small items.

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4. Round the vanity. Tight spaces can make sharp corners hip hazards. If the corners of a vanity would get in the way, opt for a rounded style. Yes, a round vanity can work in a square space. No more bruised hips!

Find That Just-Right Bathroom Vanity on Houzz

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5. Extend the counter over the toilet. This banjo-style arrangement can be done with stone or a wood slab. The extended counter creates just enough space for a few needed items. Toilet placement is not affected, and the look is minimalist and clean.

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6. Use a large-scale pattern. A large-scale pattern, like this wide stripe, can trick the eye into seeing expanded space. The square footage might stay the same, but the bathroom will feel bigger.

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7. Skip the shower door. If your bathroom is about 5 feet wide, that’s just enough space to squeeze in a toilet and a 30- by 60-inch tub. With tight conditions such as these, consider a glass panel instead of a glass shower door. It will keep most of the water in the shower and will free up needed elbow room.

8. Expand the mirror. In the tightest spaces, having a mirror stretch across the wall instead of just the vanity can enable two people to use it at once. In less-than-ideal space conditions, every inch helps.

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9. Mount the towel bar on a door. When space is at a minimum, mounting a towel bar on the shower door keeps towels handy. You might need to store the bulk of your towels in a nearby linen closet, but having that one towel close by to dry off with is essential.

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How to Design a Bathroom (with Pictures)

About This Article

Article SummaryX

To design your bathroom, start by looking at design magazines and websites and visiting local showrooms that have bathroom designs. Then, check out your bathroom’s physical space to figure out things like how much space you need for the door to open and close, and whether there’s enough room for a separate shower and tub or just a shower. When you know what your space looks like, use an online room planner to make a 3D sketch. You can then swap virtual fixtures and accessories in and out to visualize and choose different design options. To learn from our Interior Designer reviewer how picking a floating sink can maximize space in your bathroom, read on!

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A closer look at bathroom design trends for 2020

Here’s what several top designers in the D.C. region and two national experts had to say about the latest bathroom design trends.

Tubs

The Siglo Japanese soaking tub from Signature Hardware is smaller and deeper than a standard bathtub and has a bench seat. (Courtesy of Signature Hardware)

Tubs, once banished from the master bathroom, have made a comeback. But not every bathroom has room for a large, free-standing basin. Enter Japanese soaking tubs, also known as ofuro tubs. They are smaller and deeper than a standard bathtub and have a bench seat.

“Gone are the days of big bulky tubs that collect dust,” Alexandria Hubbard of Case Design/Remodeling said. “When people do take baths, they want the ultimate spa experience. People love the small, unique look of the Japanese soaking tub. They take up less space in the bathroom, come in multiple different finish options, and even will help save on you water bills as they consume less water.”

Showers

Walk-in showers with no threshold have been popular for a while. Now, the use of large-format tiles and linear drains is growing. Large-format tiles start at 16-inches but can run up to 10 feet. They are square or rectangular and made from ceramic, porcelain and stone. By minimizing grout lines, these generously sized tiles create a seamless look and give the illusion of a bigger space.

“Large-format tile is popular as it gives a consistent look to the wall and is easy to clean with less grout lines,” Anthony Wilder Design Build’s Shannon Kadwell said. “With the look of tile becoming more like real stone and without the maintenance, it is a great option for that busy lifestyle.”

Shower drains have gone from utilitarian to urbane. Rather than a center drain, showers now have floors that slope toward a long, narrow line along the floor or tucked into the wall.

“Linear drains in showers are a way to hide the necessary drain in the floor,” Kadwell said. “A linear drain is an easy way to make a shower look more elegant. For a very upscale look, you can also incorporate a wall drain when the floor slopes to one end and the water disappears beyond at a small line at the base of the wall were a drain is installed.”

Vanities

Sarah Kahn Turner of Jennifer Gilmer Kitchen & Bath installed floating vanities in this bathroom. (Keith Miller/Keiana Photography)

Floating vanities, which don’t touch the ground but hang off a wall, are a contemporary option for a clean, sleek look, Hubbard said. But they don’t have as much storage space.

“Two reasons this style of vanity has become popular is that in a small bathroom just having that extra floor space, gives the

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How this Hong Kong apartment’s views informed its interior design



a kitchen with a dining room table: Tommy Hui designed this Wong Chuk Hang apartment, aptly named the Bird Hide, to make the most of its panoramic views. Photography: Steven Ko


Tommy Hui designed this Wong Chuk Hang apartment, aptly named the Bird Hide, to make the most of its panoramic views. Photography: Steven Ko

A good view is a terrible thing to waste. And the view from the 690 sq ft Wong Chuk Hang flat that Tommy Hui Shui-cheung was hired to renovate is truly spectacular: a sweeping panorama of Bennett’s Hill and Aberdeen Harbour, with folds of greenery rolling into the sea.

“We wondered how to focus the interior on the views,” says Hui, founder of local architecture firm TBC Studio.

The clients, a young couple – a nurse and an urban planner – plan to have children, but for now they wanted a sanctuary where they could relax with family and friends. Hui worked with them to create a design he calls the Bird Hide, a reference to lookouts built to observe nature, birds especially, at close range.

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Hui wanted to make the flat as calming as its views, so he chose a relaxed palette of blond wood, complemented by a creamy pastel blue-green – the colour of the sea on a sunny day.



diagram, engineering drawing


© Provided by South China Morning Post


“We separated the living room and the dining room into two material finishes: wood veneer on one side and paint on the other,” says Hui. “For the paint, it needed to be a colour that wasn’t too dark, something more natural and cosy.”

The layout needed small changes, too. The flat’s front door opens directly into the dining and living area, so Hui used a slatted partition to create a foyer offering a gradual transition into the flat.

The next challenge was the kitchen. As in most Hong Kong flats, the small kitchen was closed off from the living and dining areas.

“It felt quite narrow,” says Hui. “So we demolished the solid partition and changed it into a glass wall so you can see through to the windows and the living space.”

Although open kitchens are now fashionable, Hui notes that they are not always practical.

“Enclosed kitchens are more functional for a lot of Chinese families because there can be a lot of smoke or smells from the cooking.” With the glass wall, he says, “it feels open but it can still be closed”.

Inside a Hong Kong home infused with Japanese aesthetics

A hallway leads from the living and dining areas to the bathroom and bed-rooms. The living room’s wood veneer wall wraps around the corner, leading to a built-in cabinet in the passage Hui designed to showcase the couple’s keepsakes. Across the hallway is a toilet and a bath-room, which the clients were inspired to separate after travelling to Japan.

“In Japan, these are often separate so they can be used by two people at the same time,” says Hui.

In addition, Japanese hygiene practices have long revolved around concepts of purity and impurity. Bathing

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SVA Interior Design Faculty Join NYCxDESIGN’s ‘Ode To NYC’ Poster Campaign

Jack Travis’ poster, We Keep From Goin’ Under, a reference to a lyric by Grandmaster Flash and The Furious Five, the seminal South Bronx hip-hop group. “It was important to me to celebrate an iconic message expressing the love for my beloved city, created by one of the most beloved NYC designers, with another iconic message from my most beloved borough,” Travis says. “You cannot stop NYC. Love you, NYC, Miss you, Milton Glaser!”

 

NYCxDESIGN’s “Ode to NYC” posters are available for sale on Poster House’s website, with proceeds going to the Black Artists + Designers Guild (BADG), a nonprofit aimed at creating a more inclusive and equitable art and design world.

 

“The local designers we tapped have created poignant, inspiring posters that illustrate the resiliency, strength and rebirth of our beloved city,” says Valerie Hoffman, program director, NYCxDESIGN.

“As a collective of independent Black artists, makers and designers striving towards creating inclusive art and design environment through equity and representation, we are gratified and excited to be a part of this wonderful initiative, put forth by the efforts of so many talented New York-based creatives,” Malene Barnett, founder of BADG, says.

 

For more information on the “Ode to NYC” poster designers, locations and sale, go to NYCXDesign.

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Workshop/APD and April Bovet Interior Design Team Up on a Cobble Hill, Brooklyn Gem

In the dining room, Eoos chairs ring a custom concrete table beneath a Rich Brilliant Willing pendant fixture. Photography by Donna Dotan.

Each of the five boroughs contains a constellation of neighborhoods with their own cultural quirks and pervading personalities. In Cobble Hill, ethnically diverse mom-and-pop shops and traditional brownstones entwine with a boho art scene, yielding an old-school yet forward-thinking Brooklyn vibe. It’s here that Workshop/APD founding principal Andrew Kotchen was given the opportunity to nestle a unique piece of architecture between two 1900s town houses, at once putting into relief the district’s dual natures.

GamFratesi stools pull up to the kitchen’s granite-topped island. Photography by Donna Dotan.

“It’s rare to get the chance to run an intelligent design process that isn’t based in historical preservation,” Kotchen says of the ground-up plan he conceived for his client, a married couple with two teenage children. After performing initial zoning studies, he and the WAPD team demolished the existing residence and inserted a modernist glass-and-steel town house, encompassing 7,000 square feet and four bedrooms across six floors. “We didn’t set out to take up every inch of buildable square footage,” Kotchen continues. “The focus was on creating comfortable, livable rooms.” Leveraging ideas from past projects with this client, he has devised, in its “calming simplicity,” an exemplar of the contemporary urban home.

White-oak built-ins backdrop an Antonio Citterio sofa and ottoman in the living room. Photography by Donna Dotan.

The streamlined program begins with a triple-height entry atrium that references elements from the facade. A screen of ebonized-oak slats rises the full 31 feet and then crosses the ceiling, the orientations nodding to the exterior’s vertical windows and horizontal Belgian bricks, which extend into the entry. Furthermore, the slat color links to the blackened steel framing those windows. It all functions as a sort of decompression chamber, providing a “gradual transition to and reveal of the
interiors,” Kotchen notes.

Slabs of honed Pietra Cardosa surround the main bathroom. Photography by Donna Dotan.

Beyond is the main living level, where the architect constructed volumes that flow and intersect seamlessly for maximum functionality. The kitchen is central, specially designed to support the client’s love of cooking and entertaining. Flanking it are the dining and living rooms, and directly behind its generous island is a clear path to stairs leading down to an expansive terrace and lawn for casual outdoor gatherings. Surfaces are clad in brushed stainless steel or black granite for textural nuance and durability. Extensive white-oak built-ins provide storage in the living room and conceal it in the dining room and kitchen. “We
approached the structure as a compositional explor­ation, using restraint to avoid over-embellishing,” Kotchen explains.

Carrie Crawford artwork and a bone-china pendant decorate the main bedroom. Photography by Donna Dotan.

It also provided a neutral envelope to backdrop the cadences of daily family life. April Bovet Interior Design was brought on to infuse the home with a
sophisticated palette that complements rather than competes with the

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Toyota Yaris review – Interior, design and technology

Toyota has bestowed the Yaris with a strong, distinctive look. The muscular wheel arches, large grille and sharp creases all contribute to a more purposeful stance than on the previous model, and an appearance which translates well to the beefed-up Yaris GR performance model.

Inside the cabin it’s a different matter. The interior design is typically Toyota – solid and practical, but with very little sparkle or sense of style. The fascia is enveloped in gloomy, black plastic, with just a few metal-effect accents on show to improve the mood.

On the plus side, there is a good level of standard equipment on offer. The entry-level Icon trim includes 16-inch alloy wheels, automatic headlights and wipers, adaptive cruise control, air conditioning, a reversing camera and a multi-function leather-trimmed steering wheel. 

Stepping up to the Design versions adds bigger 17-inch wheels, rear privacy glass, power-folding mirrors and keyless entry, while at the top end of the range, the Dynamic and Excel cars feature unique alloy wheel styles, climate control and enhanced safety kit. A head-up display system is offered with the Yaris Launch Edition.

Sat-nav, stereo and infotainment

The Yaris has a half-decent infotainment system, mounted high on the dash where it’s easy to use. Any Toyota owner will recognise the familiar switchgear, but it’s all solid and functional.

Base versions feature a 7.0-inch touch screen with Bluetooth, a DAB radio and Apple CarPlay and Android Auto connectivity. Design-spec cars include a larger 8.0-inch display and moving further up the range sees the addition of a JBL premium audio system with eight speakers.

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2021 Mercedes S-Class Shows Exterior Design, Interior Tech On Camera



a car parked in a parking lot: 2021 Mercedes-Benz S-Class walkaround video lead image


© Motor1.com
2021 Mercedes-Benz S-Class walkaround video lead image

A month after the debut, how do you like the rear end?

The Mercedes-Benz S-Class is all-new for the 2021 model year. On the outside, it may look like a simple evolution of its predecessor but the truth is it’s an all-new model underneath with many technological innovations. A new video from the Mr. Benz channel on YouTube takes a detailed look at some of the vehicle’s features.

Starting with the exterior, it’s interesting how the radiator grille is actually the same size as before but the larger headlights make the front fascia look more imposing. Also, the hood is longer, the wheels are sharper and larger, and the C-pillar flows more smoothly into the rear shoulder. 

Features such as the optional flush door handles and

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Land Rover Defender review – Interior, design and technology

Land Rover has done a great job in bringing the Defender into the 21st century. There’s a little nod to the previous model in terms of the overall look, but make no mistake – this new 4×4 is most definitely at the cutting edge in terms of off-road ability and on-board tech.

The proportions are clearly Defender-like, but everything is bigger, chunkier and designed with function clearly in mind. Inside, there are exposed screw heads, powder-coated aluminium surfaces, a magnesium bulkhead and even strips of body-coloured metal. While it’s not the usual Land Rover level of luxury, it brings a unique and refined rawness to the cabin that is as cool as anything else on sale.

Standard equipment across the range includes 18-inch alloy wheels, LED headlights, heated seats and power-folding door mirrors. Stepping up to S trim adds 19-inch wheels and upgraded upholstery, while SE and HSE cars feature luxuries such as a premium 400w Meridian audio system with ten speakers, additional leather trim in the cabin and a sliding panoramic roof. 

The top-spec X equipment line stands out from the crowd by offering a black-coloured roof and bonnet, Windsor leather seats, a 700w version of the Meridian sound system with an additional four speakers and a head-up display.

Sat-nav, stereo and infotainment

The 10-inch touchscreen is the slickest we’ve yet seen from JLR. The new Pivi Pro system allows over-the-air software updates and the latest Android Auto and Apple CarPlay connectivity. 

In addition to the infotainment set-up, entry-level Defenders feature Land Rover’s Connected Navigation Pro, a 180W audio system with six speakers and an online pack with data plan.

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