Oregon House Republicans’ PAC files complaint over Democrat’s incorrect voters’ pamphlet statement

A political action committee controlled by Oregon House Republicans on Wednesday asked the secretary of state to investigate, after the campaign manager for Democratic House candidate Lynnette Shaw of rural Yamhill County acknowledged that Shaw’s voters’ pamphlet statement contained incorrect information.



Oregon House Republicans' PAC on Wednesday filed a complaint over a Democratic candidate's incorrect voters' pamphlet statement. Dave Killen / Staff


© Dave Killen/The Oregonian/oregonlive.com/TNS
Oregon House Republicans’ PAC on Wednesday filed a complaint over a Democratic candidate’s incorrect voters’ pamphlet statement. Dave Killen / Staff

Shaw’s campaign manager Dustin Daniel told Willamette Week on Tuesday that in an “unfortunate mistake,” Shaw’s statement in the general election voters’ pamphlet incorrectly stated she earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Minnesota. Daniel told the newspaper that Shaw’s statement in the primary election voters’ pamphlet correctly stated she attended the University of Minnesota. Her candidate filing for the general election says she completed three years of college.

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Trey Rosser, executive director of the Evergreen Oregon PAC, pointed out that Shaw’s LinkedIn resume also lists a bachelor’s degree from the University of Minnesota. Rosser wrote in the complaint to Secretary of State Bev Clarno, “By knowingly submitting a voters’ pamphlet statement with false information, Lynnette Shaw is clearly in violation of state law. As you know, violations of ORS 260.715 are a Class C Felony.”

Two years ago, a Bend House candidate’s false statement that she received a college degree also became an issue and ultimately caused Amanda La Bell to quit the race.

House District 24, which covers portions of Yamhill and Washington counties, is currently held by Republican Rep. Ron Noble, who is running for re-election. It is among the most hotly contested Oregon legislative races in the state and as of the end of September, it was the 12th most expensive race, The Oregonian/OregonLive reported.

Shaw could not immediately be reached for comment.

— Hillary Borrud 5/8 [email protected] 5/8 503-294-4034 5/8 @hborrud

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Top Democrats accuse White House of withholding information on COVID-19 outbreak

Top Senate Democrats are accusing the White House of “deliberately” withholding information about a coronavirus outbreak after a Rose Garden event, which the lawmakers called a “super spreader.” 

Senate Democratic Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerSchumer and Statehood for Puerto Rico Trump orders aides to halt talks on COVID-19 relief Jewish lawmakers targeted by anti-Semitic tweets ahead of election: ADL MORE (N.Y.) and Sen. Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayTop Democrats accuse White House of withholding information on COVID-19 outbreak GOP struggles to play defense on Trump’s ObamaCare lawsuit Poll finds support for independent arbiters resolving ‘surprise’ medical bills MORE (Wash.), the No. 3 Democrat and ranking member of the health committee, sent a letter to White House chief of staff Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsFormer GOP chair Michael Steele calls Trump ‘the superspreader’ in the White House Murkowski after Trump halts talks: Congress must move on virus package Overnight Health Care: Trump calls off coronavirus relief talks MORE saying the White House had “conducted itself in a secretive manner and shown a complete lack of regard for public health and safety” after President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump and Biden’s plans would both add to the debt, analysis finds Trump says he will back specific relief measures hours after halting talks Trump lashes out at FDA over vaccine guidelines MORE and top staffers tested positive for COVID-19.

“The opaque and secretive handling of information related to these events constitutes an obvious threat to public health and is unacceptable in a free nation whose elected leaders must be transparent with and accountable to the American people,” they added to Meadows. 

Schumer and Murray are asking Meadows to detail what, if any, contact tracing the White House has done in connection to several individuals who tested positive for the coronavirus after attending the Rose Garden event late last month where Trump announced Judge Amy Coney Barrett’s Supreme Court nomination.

They are also asking for Meadows to provide “complete transparency” on the timeline of the outbreak and what guidance has been given to White House staff. The White House has refused to say when Trump last tested negative.

Trump announced in the middle of the night Thursday that he had tested positive for the coronavirus, and he spent the weekend in Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, a move the White House has said was done out of an abundance of caution. 

But the president’s medical team and the White House have refused to provide key details on the timeline of his illness. 

White House physician Sean Conley told reporters Monday that Trump’s symptoms have continued to improve and that he has met or exceeded all discharge criteria. The president returned to the White House on Monday evening but Conley acknowledged that Trump may not yet be “out of the woods,” underscoring the degree of uncertainty surrounding his condition. 

Conley also refused to answer multiple questions about when Trump last tested negative for the virus, something White House officials have similarly declined to share

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House Democrats propose antitrust overhaul to rein in big tech

But partisan disagreements over next steps may blunt the report’s immediate impact, despite a widespread desire to rein in Silicon Valley titans among both conservative and liberal lawmakers. Several of the committee’s Republicans, led by Rep. Ken Buck of Colorado, endorsed some Democrat-backed proposals in a separate report unveiled Tuesday while warning that the majority’s more aggressive recommendations are “non-starters for conservatives.”

The investigation: The subcommittee issued Tuesday’s recommendations in a report that assailed the business practices of Silicon Valley’s most powerful companies, who lawmakers said have unfairly stifled competitors to the detriment of consumers. As part of the probe, lawmakers and staff have collected over a million documents, interviewed hundreds of witnesses and hauled in the companies’ CEOs to testify this summer.

Among other allegations, the panel investigated complaints that tech titans have trampled competitors by acquiring up-and-coming rivals and favoring their own products on the online storefronts they operate, such as Amazon’s Marketplace and Apple’s App Store.

“To put it simply, companies that once were scrappy, underdog startups that challenged the status quo have become the kinds of monopolies we last saw in the era of oil barons and railroad tycoons,” Judiciary Chair Jerry Nadler (D-N.Y.) and subcommittee Chair David Cicilline (D-R.I.) said in the report. “Although these firms have delivered clear benefits to society, the dominance of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google has come at a price.”

The proposals: The report calls for an array of changes, some of which boast bipartisan support while others have only Democratic backing.

Among them are Democratic proposals to ban major tech platforms from acquiring future startups or potential rivals and barring them from both owning marketplaces — such as Amazon’s sprawling e-commerce hub — and selling competing products on them.

The report also calls on Congress to grant federal antitrust enforcers new resources to police possible abuses by the major firms, despite decades of “institutional failure” where the agencies “failed to block monopolists from establishing or maintaining their dominance.” Recommendation include increasing budgets, allowing the Federal Trade Commission to seek civil penalties for violations and imposing stricter prohibitions on senior staff from the agencies doing work for the companies after their tenure.

Democratic subcommittee member Pramila Jayapal of Washington state said Tuesday that she expects lawmakers will quickly look to turn the policy recommendations into actionable legislation once Congress returns in 2021 — if not sooner.

“I do hope that we will have legislation introduced early in the session and we can ideally in a year move significant pieces of legislation,” she said in an interview.

Where the parties differ: Republican lawmakers said in a separate report Tuesday that they support boosting funding and staffing levels for regulators and some more modest proposals to change U.S. antitrust laws, but they balked at Democrats’ more aggressive proposals. They include what Cicilline has described as a Glass-Steagall law for technology platforms, a reference to the Depression-era law that split up commercial and investment

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House Democrats say Big Tech must be reined in

Democratic lawmakers are calling for the U.S. to rein in the power of Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google, as well as overhauling U.S. antitrust law, in a sweeping report on the the dominance of Big Tech.

The 450-page report, released Tuesday by the House Antitrust Subcommittee, details a range of anticompetitive practices, charging the four companies with acting as gatekeepers, stifling competition, charging “exorbitant” fees and eroding democracy.

“Put simply, companies that once were scrappy, underdog startups that challenged the status quo have become the kinds of monopolies we last saw in the era of oil barons and railroad tycoons,” the report said.

The panel calls for sharply curtailing tech companies’ power, including force them to spin off their platforms from their other lines of business. This can be done by either splitting up tech companies or by limiting them to a single industry, according to the report.  

Under current law, companies active across multiple industries can use their dominance in one area to undercut competition elsewhere. For instance, the committee found that Google’s ownership of the Android smartphone operating system gives it “near-perfect market intelligence” on companies who develop apps for Android, which allows the internet giant to easily create competing apps. 

Amazon also uses information on third-party sellers on its popular marketplace to develop competing products, the report found. 

“Each platform now serves as a gatekeeper over a key channel of distribution,” the report said. “By controlling access to markets, these giants can pick winners and losers throughout our economy.”


Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

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The lawmakers also call for the platforms to be required to offer equal terms for equal products and services for all users. That would prevent companies from favoring their own products on platforms they run, as Amazon has been accused of doing in its marketplace, and Google has been accused of doing in search.

The report proposes changing antitrust laws to impose a higher bar on the approval of tech industry mergers and acquisitions. Finally, it proposes doing away with so-called mandatory arbitration clauses in tech companies’ terms of service. These clauses have proliferated in recent years and prevent users from going to court or joining class-action lawsuits if they have a dispute, instead requiring them to resolve disputes individually in private arbitration proceedings.

Although the 15-month investigation was bipartisan, Republican members of the antitrust committee dissented from most of the panel’s recommendations. Republican members issued a competing report that disagreed with the suggestions to break up large technology companies. 

The GOP report alleged that Google and Facebook censored conservative content and decried the Democrats for declining to look into Twitter, which has also been accused of having an anticonservative bias.

The Associated Press contributed reporting.

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House Democrats seek to block funds for ‘defeat despair’ Covid ads

House Democrats overseeing the Trump administration’s coronavirus response will introduce a largely symbolic bill intended to limit the administration’s ability to spend federal funds on certain coronavirus-related advertisements before the election, according to a draft shared first with POLITICO.

The Defeat Pandemic Propaganda Act of 2020 is authored by Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-Ill.), joined by Reps. Carolyn Maloney (D-N.Y), Jim Clyburn (D-S.C.) and Rosa DeLauro (D-Conn.). The Democrats’ bill would bar HHS from using taxpayer funds on an ad campaign to “positively influence public perception regarding the Covid–19 pandemic,” specifically distort any facts or encourage risky behaviors amid the outbreak.

“[F]ederally-funded advertisements meant to cast the situation in a positive light or suggest there is no longer a need to take public health precautions would be wholly unethical, especially in the weeks before a presidential election,” Krishnamoorthi said in a statement. A spokesperson for Krishnamoorthi acknowledged the difficulty of moving such legislation forward in a split Congress weeks before the election.

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Speaker Pelosi, House Democrats leave town, fail the American people

Wheels up, off to California after adjourning the House until after Election Day. It’s a shameful display of partisanship in the wake of our recovery from the coronavirus. Rather than help small businesses continue to access unused funds from the Paycheck Protection Program, Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiGOP lawmaker calls on Pelosi to apologize for response to Trump contracting coronavirus Pelosi: ‘We’re making progress’ on coronavirus relief bill What President Trump’s positive COVID test could mean for the markets MORE (D-Calif.) is willing to block reasonable relief efforts, all in the name of politics. She doesn’t want to risk President TrumpDonald John TrumpQuestions remain unanswered as White House casts upbeat outlook on Trump’s COVID-19 fight White House staffers get email saying to stay home if they experience coronavirus symptoms White House says ‘appropriate precautions’ were taken for Trump’s outing to see supporters MORE and congressional Republicans getting an ounce of credit in the final weeks of this election.

Some things are simply more important than political posturing, like ensuring American small businesses can weather the storm of the coronavirus pandemic. We have unspent funds from the Paycheck Protection Program, a COVID relief program that saved 51 million jobs in the United States, 2 million in Ohio alone. Its authorization is expiring, meaning the program is closing up shop, despite $138 billion left in the coffers. My Ohio colleague, Rep Steve ChabotSteven (Steve) Joseph ChabotKate Schroder in Ohio among Democratic challengers squelching GOP hopes for the House Centrist Democrats ‘strongly considering’ discharge petition on GOP PPP bill Lawmakers call for expanded AI role in education, business to remain competitive MORE, has a simple, straightforward bill that reauthorizes the unspent funds through the end of the year, expands the eligible entities and expenses, and further protects the program so that businesses with fewer than 300 employees can get to the front of the line.

We are on the right path toward economic recovery, with more than 10 million jobs created or brought back after the worst of the pandemic. But as states re-open at different paces, we still have businesses struggling to adjust and keep their doors open. Mom and pop stores, those with just a handful of employees are bearing the brunt of the economic damage. That’s why this PPP extension bill earmarks $25 billion for businesses with 10 or fewer employees and, if a business receives a second PPP loan, this bill ensures the total of those two loans cannot exceed $10 million.

Those businesses with just a few employees can make up a large number of loans in the program, but those loans will often be some of the smallest approved by the Small Business Administration. They are businesses that would struggle with the compliance and paperwork costs associated with byzantine processes mandated by federal regulators. This bill eliminates this problem: a simple form attesting that the business complied with the loan requirements is all that will be needed. It also requires them to keep records

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House Democrats push forward on probe of Pompeo’s political speeches

House Democrats are widening an investigation into whether Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoTrump COVID-19 result raises pressure on Pompeo GOP Sen. Thom Tillis tests positive for coronavirus Pelosi tests negative for COVID-19 MORE is illegally campaigning for the president ahead of the November election. 

Reps. Eliot EngelEliot Lance EngelDemocrats introduce bill to combat sexual harassment at State Department Overnight Defense: Congress recommends nuclear arms treaty be extended | Dems warn Turkey | Military’s eighth COVID death identified Democrats warn Turkey over involvement in Azerbaijan-Armenia conflict MORE (D-N.Y.), chairman of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, and Joaquin CastroJoaquin CastroCalls for COVID-19 tests at Capitol grow after Trump tests positive Democrats introduce bill to combat sexual harassment at State Department Disinformation, QAnon efforts targeting Latino voters ramp up ahead of presidential election MORE (D-Texas), chairman of the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations, sent a letter Monday to the State Department demanding the agency’s legal guidance over at least three recent speeches Pompeo delivered in the U.S. 

This includes speeches to the Wisconsin state legislature and a church in Texas in September and a speech Saturday at an event for the anti-abortion advocacy organization the Florida Family Policy Council.

Pompeo was originally expected to deliver his remarks in person, where attendees paid upward of $10,000 for tickets to secure a personal visit with the secretary, CNN reported.

Pompeo rescheduled his remarks, delivering them remotely from Washington out of an abundance of caution following President TrumpDonald John TrumpQuestions remain unanswered as White House casts upbeat outlook on Trump’s COVID-19 fight White House staffers get email saying to stay home if they experience coronavirus symptoms White House says ‘appropriate precautions’ were taken for Trump’s outing to see supporters MORE’s positive diagnosis of COVID-19. 

But his participation in the event one month before the election is adding to outrage from congressional Democrats with oversight of foreign affairs. Trump is trailing Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenQuestions remain unanswered as White House casts upbeat outlook on Trump’s COVID-19 fight CNN anchor confronts senior Trump campaign adviser after motorcade: Trump’s ‘downplaying the virus’ Biden again tests negative for COVID-19 MORE in Florida, according to the most recent poll published by Siena College and The New York Times. 

“It is concerning that the Secretary is suddenly crisscrossing the country at taxpayers’ expense to speak with state legislators and private groups and that these events appear to be increasing in frequency as the November 3rd election approaches,” Engel and Castro wrote in the letter.

It was sent to Undersecretary of State for Management Brian Bulatao and acting Legal Adviser Marik String, two close allies of Pompeo.

The documents requested by House Democrats builds on an investigation launched in August over whether Pompeo violated the Hatch Act by delivering pre-recorded remarks to the Republican National Convention while he was on diplomatic travel in Israel. 

The Hatch Act prohibits federal officials from using their government positions for partisan political activity. In June,

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House Democrats Probe White House Over Swaying FDA, CDC on Virus

(Bloomberg) — A House Oversight subcommittee wants two federal health agencies at the fore of the U.S. coronavirus response to disclose information about the White House’s involvement in scientific decisions, according to letters reviewed by Bloomberg News.



a sign on the side of a building: A pedestrian wearing a protective face mask walks past the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S, on Saturday, March 14, 2020. As the novel coronavirus has spread in the U.S., the CDC is under increasing heat to defend a shaky rollout of crucial testing kits.


© Bloomberg
A pedestrian wearing a protective face mask walks past the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S, on Saturday, March 14, 2020. As the novel coronavirus has spread in the U.S., the CDC is under increasing heat to defend a shaky rollout of crucial testing kits.

The letters addressed to the leaders of the Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention seek documents about agency actions submitted to the White House for review, including communications, comments, first drafts and documents that show changes made during the review process.

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The letters sent Monday are signed by Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi, an Illinois Democrat who is the chairman of the Subcommittee on Economic and Consumer Policy of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform.

The subcommittee’s letters express concern about the influence of non-scientists and political appointees over public-health decisions, including how the FDA will assess experimental coronavirus vaccines now in trials. The letter to the CDC asks about what it calls “White House censorship” of CDC guidance.

President Donald Trump has repeatedly said that a coronavirus vaccine will be widely available faster than top government scientists say is likely. The FDA has been expected to issue final guidelines on how vaccines may be cleared for emergency use, a document intended to assuage concerns that a shot might be rushed to market for political reasons.

Trump said last month that the White House might not approve the FDA’s guidelines for vaccine authorization. They haven’t been published as of Monday morning. Krishnamoorthi asked the FDA to publish such guidelines in a previous letter.

Extensive Reviews

Monday’s letters ask about the role of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, known as OIRA, in decisions at the scientific agencies. OIRA, part of the Office of Management and Budget, has legal authority to review federal regulations.

Representatives for the CDC and FDA didn’t immediately comment. A spokesperson for the White House Office of Management and Budget, which oversees OIRA, didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

Bloomberg News reported last month that OIRA and other agencies performed extensive reviews of CDC publications related to the coronavirus that delayed guidelines for nursing homes, schools, houses of worship, and businesses, sometimes for weeks.

A new process to review nearly every public document or guideline related to Covid-19 delayed CDC publications in layers of bureaucracy from across the federal government, Bloomberg reported, citing people familiar with the matter.

Administration officials defended the process, saying it was within OIRA’s authority, and didn’t diverge from past practice.

The White House Coronavirus Task Force sought to make sure CDC’s communications were “fully reviewed, studied, and vetted by administration officials, including the top medical doctors, for accuracy, effectiveness,

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Bipartisan talks continue as House Democrats pass $2.2 trillion coronavirus measure

The House on Thursday night passed a $2.2 trillion coronavirus relief bill, but it has little chance of advancing in the GOP-led Senate, and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) is still trying to work out a deal with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin that is acceptable to Democrats and Senate Republicans.

The measure is a scaled-back version of the $3.4 trillion relief package passed by the House in May. No Republicans voted for it, and 20 Democrats, mostly from swing districts, also voted against it. Pelosi is facing pressure from some Democrats to reach a quick compromise with Mnuchin, who is offering a $1.6 trillion bill, but she said on the floor before Thursday’s vote that this is a “values debate. It’s important for people to know what this fight is about. The people have needs, and we have to meet them.”

When it comes to offering relief, Democrats are pushing for more aid to go to state and local governments, while the GOP wants liability protections for schools and businesses, Politico reports. Pelosi told reporters on Thursday night she is still reviewing the latest documents from Mnuchin, and “even if we come to some agreement, nothing is agreed to until everything is agreed to — it’s the language.”

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House approves $2.2 trillion stimulus plan from Democrats with no bipartisan deal in sight

The House of Representatives on Thursday approved a $2.2 trillion coronavirus stimulus proposal put forward by House Democrats with no bipartisan deal in sight, even as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin have continued talks in an effort to reach an agreement.



a person wearing a suit and tie talking on a cell phone: WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 23: U.S. Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) arrives at the U.S. Capitol on April 23, 2020 in Washington, DC. The House of Representatives is expected to vote later today on the latest economic stimulus package passed earlier in the week by the U.S. Senate. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)


© Win McNamee/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC – APRIL 23: U.S. Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) arrives at the U.S. Capitol on April 23, 2020 in Washington, DC. The House of Representatives is expected to vote later today on the latest economic stimulus package passed earlier in the week by the U.S. Senate. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

The measure passed largely along party lines amid GOP opposition with a final tally of 214-207. Eighteen Democrats crossed party lines to vote against the bill, while Republicans were united in opposition.

The legislation will give Democrats something to point to as lawmakers face pressure from constituents to deliver more aid as the pandemic continues to take a devastating toll across America. But the Democratic plan has been rejected by Republicans as too costly and is not expected to be taken up by the GOP-led Senate, and time is quickly running out to clinch a bipartisan agreement that could be signed into law ahead of Election Day.

Pelosi, as she walked off the House floor, told a group of reporters Thursday evening ahead of the vote that there will be no agreement on any stimulus deal Thursday night, but talks with Mnuchin will continue.

Pelosi stressed that the central issue is less about whether they can reach a topline agreement in principle, but about whether they can nail down the actual details in legislative language.

“Even if we came to some agreement, nothing is agreed to until everything is agreed to. It’s the language,” Pelosi said.

Pelosi said she was headed back to her office to review documents sent to her by Mnuchin and would figure out where things go next after that.

Pelosi and Mnuchin spoke by phone on Thursday afternoon, but after the call there was still no deal at hand.

Drew Hammill, Pelosi’s deputy chief of staff, tweeted later that during the call “the two discussed further clarifications on amounts and language but distance on key areas remain. Their conversation will continue this afternoon.”

Video: Pelosi: Dems will propose new covid relief plan shortly (CNN)

Pelosi: Dems will propose new covid relief plan shortly

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In an indication of how challenging it may be to reach a bipartisan agreement at this point, Pelosi, on a private call with the House Democratic whip team Thursday morning, sounded very down about the prospects of a deal for a new stimulus package to respond to the Covid-19 pandemic and its economic fallout, according to two people on the call.

Pelosi repeatedly spoke of the “different values” held by Democrats and Republicans, making clear that even the latest offer from Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin fell far short of what was needed to

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