Five tips on starting a fall veggie garden, including how to get transplants, soil delivered – Food and Dining – Austin American-Statesman

We seem to have an earlier introduction to fall than usual, with slightly cooler temperatures and rain in the first half of September rather than the second. Sometimes, we don’t get those hints of fall until October.

With so many fall events canceled, many of us are looking for ways to stay active at home, which might mean starting a fall vegetable garden for the first time. Whether you’re a true novice or returning to gardening after a break, here are five Austin-centric tips for getting started.

1. You’re gonna need good soil. Don’t rely on the dirt that’s already in your backyard. Pick up several bags of gardening soil and at least one bag of compost. Add a few scoopfuls of compost to each raised bed and then do that again in a few months, around the base of the plants.

2. Start some plants with seeds but use transplants for others. Carrots, cilantro, lettuce and radishes are best started from seed, but I like using already established transplants for brassicas, including broccoli and cauliflower. Beets, kale, chard and other greens you can start from seeds or transplants. (You can start some of those transplants yourself inside in those black seedling trays.) It’s not too late to throw late-season peppers and tomatoes in the ground, but those should be already established plants. Here’s a Central Texas guide for when to plant what.

3. You can get many garden supplies delivered, including transplants. In Austin, Lone Star Nursery used to be a wholesale nursery, but now they are focusing exclusively on delivering to home gardeners, and they are also already selling fall transplants that aren’t yet for sale at other gardening stores. There are more garden supply stores than you might think in the Austin area, but not all of them have fall vegetable transplants this early in the season.

4. Keep those seedlings moist. We still have temperatures in the upper 80s and low 90s, which is tough on these cool weather-loving plants, so make sure you water every day in the morning. Many plants also wouldn’t mind a spritz again in the evening. The upside about starting a fall garden early is that you can start to harvest some of these greens and veggies in October and November, but the downside is they need a little extra TLC to get started. The extra fragile ones, like lettuce and carrots, might need a little shade if we get some extra hot afternoons later this month.

5. Ask for help. Gardeners love to give advice, and farmers do, too, especially if you’re buying produce from them at the farmers market. Some farmers markets, including Barton Creek Farmers Market on Saturdays where Rasmey’s Garden sells veggie transplants, have booths were you can buy transplants and chat with a grower to get more tips specific to what you want to grow. As a result of the coronavirus, many gardening groups and experts are hosting virtual classes this fall to help get you

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Five tips on starting a fall veggie garden, including how to get transplants, soil delivered – Food and Dining – Austin 360

We seem to have an earlier introduction to fall than usual, with slightly cooler temperatures and rain in the first half of September rather than the second. Sometimes, we don’t get those hints of fall until October.

With so many fall events canceled, many of us are looking for ways to stay active at home, which might mean starting a fall vegetable garden for the first time. Whether you’re a true novice or returning to gardening after a break, here are five Austin-centric tips for getting started.

1. You’re gonna need good soil. Don’t rely on the dirt that’s already in your backyard. Pick up several bags of gardening soil and at least one bag of compost. Add a few scoopfuls of compost to each raised bed and then do that again in a few months, around the base of the plants.

2. Start some plants with seeds but use transplants for others. Carrots, cilantro, lettuce and radishes are best started from seed, but I like using already established transplants for brassicas, including broccoli and cauliflower. Beets, kale, chard and other greens you can start from seeds or transplants. (You can start some of those transplants yourself inside in those black seedling trays.) It’s not too late to throw late-season peppers and tomatoes in the ground, but those should be already established plants. Here’s a Central Texas guide for when to plant what.

3. You can get many garden supplies delivered, including transplants. In Austin, Lone Star Nursery used to be a wholesale nursery, but now they are focusing exclusively on delivering to home gardeners, and they are also already selling fall transplants that aren’t yet for sale at other gardening stores. There are more garden supply stores than you might think in the Austin area, but not all of them have fall vegetable transplants this early in the season.

4. Keep those seedlings moist. We still have temperatures in the upper 80s and low 90s, which is tough on these cool weather-loving plants, so make sure you water every day in the morning. Many plants also wouldn’t mind a spritz again in the evening. The upside about starting a fall garden early is that you can start to harvest some of these greens and veggies in October and November, but the downside is they need a little extra TLC to get started. The extra fragile ones, like lettuce and carrots, might need a little shade if we get some extra hot afternoons later this month.

5. Ask for help. Gardeners love to give advice, and farmers do, too, especially if you’re buying produce from them at the farmers market. Some farmers markets, including Barton Creek Farmers Market on Saturdays where Rasmey’s Garden sells veggie transplants, have booths were you can buy transplants and chat with a grower to get more tips specific to what you want to grow. As a result of the coronavirus, many gardening groups and experts are hosting virtual classes this fall to help get you

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"Africa For Africans" – Speech Delivered by Marcus Garvey at Madison Square Garden, New York

Marcus Garvey was an inspiration to many; However, he encountered much difficulty in trying to implement his plan of returning Africans to Africa . Not only was he fought against by non-Africans, but he was fought against by African-Americans. His speech given at Madison Square Garden, regarding Africa for Africans, Egypt for the Egyptians, Asia for the Asians, and Ireland for the Irish was very emotional and soul stirring to many of African descent.

Marcus Garvey's plea had a message of liberty for Africans. His message highlighted the point that all men should be free to work for their own salvation. Since other nations were working to achieve theirs salvation, Africans should be allowed to do the same, and they should be given the latitude to create their own cultural heritage. His appeal was to the white world to yield unto Africans a place where they would be able to develop their national freedom; that place being Africa.

His plea was not for Africans to take America from non-Africans, but for those who were not of African descent to return Africa to Africans, and to allow the scattered and abused children of Africa the blessings of returning to their homeland in Africa. He did not believe in any one race having a monopoly on the world since it would be impossible for such a race to govern others and itself.

Garvey felt that no Blackman was good enough to govern whites, and as a result, no white person good enough to govern Blacks. He espoused that the Blackman should have liberty from white oppression. He expressed the thought that other civilizations have failed when they tried to rule others that were not of their own nation. As a result, each should govern its own people and in righteousness everyone should live and let others live in peace.

He expressed the thought that no one had an exclusives right to rule others and that each nation should be equal to the next. He requested that whites should help the Africans return to Africa. He articulated the fact that America has helped the Jews, Poles, Russians, Germans, and Armenians, and should also help Africans return to Africa, thus making Africa for Africans.

Finally, his policy regarding intellectuals Negroes exposed the principle that they are no less cunning than their illustrious teacher. This casts such individuals in the light of being a rouge and likewise a vagabond. Individuals of such caliber are lazy, dull, uncreative, and are agitators as their so called industrious non-African masters who trained them; Therefore, they are not welcomed in Africa.

Reactions By Citizens Regarding Garvey's Speech

Many reacted by stating that Marcus Garvey had a workable plan for Africans. They believed in his plan of Africa for Africans. Others have stated that whites did not want Africans to leave America for Africa and they were unwilling to help with such an event. As a result, they fought against Marcus Garvey and employed others to fight against him. If …

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