Social media confounded by bizarre interior of Florida condo for sale: ‘Dear God’

A two-bedroom, two-bathroom condo in Lake Worth, Florida, is on sale for just $100,000 — but it requires a very, very specific buyer.

Why? Well, the walls of the “social media-worthy” condo are covered almost entirely in empty cans of Budweiser.

Whoever the current owner and seller of this condo is clearly has a thing for the American-style pale lager. Every single room, save for one ordinary bathroom, is decorated floor-to-ceiling with cans of Budweiser.

Though it’s impossible to ignore the beer cans everywhere, whoever the listing agent is for the condo did their best to make them sound appealing rather than alarmingly confusing.

“Entering the spacious 2BR/2BA corner-unit condo, you immediately reminisce of long road trips and the inevitable belting out of the beloved song, ’99 Bottles of Beer on the Wall!’” the listing says. “Budweiser’s biggest fan meticulously adorned the walls and ceilings with Budweiser beer cans to display and showcase their intense love for one of America’s favorite domestic brews! Whether you keep the current décor for your Youtube beer show or decide to renovate the home, this property offers tons of entertainment potential!”

Despite the agent’s best efforts, though, most people on social media still seem to find the boozy condo rather … odd.

“Just because you can doesn’t mean you should,” one person joked about the unusual decor.

“I was wondering why it was 100k and then I looked at the interior dear GOD,” another user added.

“I’d lock myself in the bathroom and never come out,” a third person remarked.

Some savvy social media users, however, see the $100,000 condo covered in empty cans as a worthy investment opportunity, especially seeing as the cans can be recycled for a pretty penny.

“Think of all the money you could get turning those cans in,” one person remarked. “The house pays for itself.”

“I’m not sure, but I think you could pay this house off by just recycling all the cans,” another user added.

So, who’s brave enough to take the plunge and buy the beer house?

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If you enjoyed this story, check out this “skinny” house with absurd proportions that went viral on TikTok.

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Florida condo with bizarre wall decor confounds prospective buyers: ‘Dear God’

A two-bedroom, two-bathroom condo in Lake Worth, Florida, is on sale for just $100,000 — but it requires a very, very specific buyer.

Why? Well, the walls of the “social media-worthy” condo are covered almost entirely in empty cans of Budweiser.

Whoever the current owner and seller of this condo is clearly has a thing for the American-style pale lager. Every single room, save for one ordinary bathroom, is decorated floor-to-ceiling with cans of Budweiser.

Though it’s impossible to ignore the beer cans everywhere, whoever the listing agent is for the condo did their best to make them sound appealing rather than alarmingly confusing.

“Entering the spacious 2BR/2BA corner-unit condo, you immediately reminisce of long road trips and the inevitable belting out of the beloved song, ’99 Bottles of Beer on the Wall!’” the listing says. “Budweiser’s biggest fan meticulously adorned the walls and ceilings with Budweiser beer cans to display and showcase their intense love for one of America’s favorite domestic brews! Whether you keep the current décor for your Youtube beer show or decide to renovate the home, this property offers tons of entertainment potential!”

Despite the agent’s best efforts, though, most people on social media still seem to find the boozy condo rather … odd.

“Just because you can doesn’t mean you should,” one person joked about the unusual decor.

“I was wondering why it was 100k and then I looked at the interior dear GOD,” another user added.

“I’d lock myself in the bathroom and never come out,” a third person remarked.

Some savvy social media users, however, see the $100,000 condo covered in empty cans as a worthy investment opportunity, especially seeing as the cans can be recycled for a pretty penny.

“Think of all the money you could get turning those cans in,” one person remarked. “The house pays for itself.”

“I’m not sure, but I think you could pay this house off by just recycling all the cans,” another user added.

So, who’s brave enough to take the plunge and buy the beer house?

Snag a 30-day free trial of Kindle Unlimited:

If you enjoyed this story, check out this “skinny” house with absurd proportions that went viral on TikTok.

More from In The Know:

This “run-down” house with no bathrooms is on sale for nearly $600,000

See inside this customized tiny home that’s complete with a patio and garden

Amazon’s best-selling seat cushion has done wonders for my bum while WFH

Subscribe to our daily newsletter to stay In The Know

The post This Florida condo is a beer lover’s dream appeared first on In The Know.

Source Article

Read more

Dear Annie: Divided kitchen table

Dear Annie: My wife and I have just celebrated our ninth wedding anniversary. Two years ago, she decided to become a vegan for moral and dietary reasons. I respect her greatly for that, though I didn’t love constantly hearing about it. I have also adopted many of the same eating habits, but I do still eat meat. We have both learned to prepare very nice vegan dishes that the other enjoys. Lately, however, she has decided to adopt a whole-food, plant-based diet, she also has decided to use a lot of spices in her foods that I cannot eat. For the past two years, I have not cooked meat in our house nor have I fired up my barbecue out of respect for her. Now, I find myself wanting to again cook dishes for myself that I feel are healthy but that include lean meats: chicken fajitas, turkey chili, etc… Do I have the right to cook in my house and if so, how do I approach the subject with her in a way that she doesn’t “flip out”? — Omnivore Husband in Oregon

Dear Omnivore: Your wife wouldn’t appreciate it if you told her how to eat. She should respect your right to decide what you’d like to eat, too. However, I have a feeling that you may want to take a leaf from her book once you see the effects of a whole-food, plant-based diet. It’s one of the healthiest ways to eat and has been shown to be effective against many common chronic diseases, including heart disease and Type 2 diabetes. (Check out “Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease” by Caldwell Esselstyn, M.D., and “The China Study” by T. Colin Campbell, Ph.D., for more information.) So, keep an open mind.

Dear Annie: I am going through a really hard time right now. My husband is dying with stage 4 non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in the pancreas. His doctor told me that it’s getting to be time to call in our family. I’m with him 24/7. We have been married for 23 years and have three wonderful children together ages 17 through 21. My husband asked me to tell the hospital that he doesn’t want anyone in the room with him except for me, our kids and three other family members. This doesn’t include any immediate members of his family of origin, and they are blaming me for this. I am doing what my husband asks. His family has not been around us at all this whole time that he has been sick, and now they are wanting to act like they really care. Don’t get me wrong; I really do love my in-laws, but how do I honor my husband’s wishes while not hurting his family? I’m the one with him day and night, never even once leaving the room from him. I don’t want to hurt anyone! — Wife in the Middle

Dear Wife in the Middle: I am so sorry that your husband is dying.

There are no

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Dear Annie: Divided kitchen table – Entertainment & Life – telegram.com

Dear Annie: My wife and I have just celebrated our ninth wedding anniversary. Two years ago, she decided to become a vegan for moral and dietary reasons. I respect her greatly for that, though I didn’t love constantly hearing about it. I have also adopted many of the same eating habits, but I do still eat meat. We have both learned to prepare very nice vegan dishes that the other enjoys. Lately, however, she has decided to adopt a whole-food, plant-based diet, she also has decided to use a lot of spices in her foods that I cannot eat. For the past two years, I have not cooked meat in our house nor have I fired up my barbecue out of respect for her. Now, I find myself wanting to again cook dishes for myself that I feel are healthy but that include lean meats: chicken fajitas, turkey chili, etc… Do I have the right to cook in my house and if so, how do I approach the subject with her in a way that she doesn’t “flip out”? — Omnivore Husband in Oregon

Dear Omnivore: Your wife wouldn’t appreciate it if you told her how to eat. She should respect your right to decide what you’d like to eat, too. However, I have a feeling that you may want to take a leaf from her book once you see the effects of a whole-food, plant-based diet. It’s one of the healthiest ways to eat and has been shown to be effective against many common chronic diseases, including heart disease and Type 2 diabetes. (Check out “Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease” by Caldwell Esselstyn, M.D., and “The China Study” by T. Colin Campbell, Ph.D., for more information.) So, keep an open mind.

Dear Annie: I am going through a really hard time right now. My husband is dying with stage 4 non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in the pancreas. His doctor told me that it’s getting to be time to call in our family. I’m with him 24/7. We have been married for 23 years and have three wonderful children together ages 17 through 21. My husband asked me to tell the hospital that he doesn’t want anyone in the room with him except for me, our kids and three other family members. This doesn’t include any immediate members of his family of origin, and they are blaming me for this. I am doing what my husband asks. His family has not been around us at all this whole time that he has been sick, and now they are wanting to act like they really care. Don’t get me wrong; I really do love my in-laws, but how do I honor my husband’s wishes while not hurting his family? I’m the one with him day and night, never even once leaving the room from him. I don’t want to hurt anyone! — Wife in the Middle

Dear Wife in the Middle: I am so sorry that your husband is dying.

There are no

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Dear Annie: Lake house owner makes a distinction between ‘visitors’ and ‘vacationers’

Dear Annie: My husband and I are 77 years old. Our lake home has four bedrooms and plenty of space for family visits. During the summer, the family knows they have to make “reservations” to visit. Sometimes, we will have seven immediate family members here, and once we had 18 nephews and nieces and their families. They have use of our boats and always replace the gas they used. We feel fortunate that we can allow them to have a family vacation that is relatively inexpensive for them. Many have thanked us for the memories they have made over the past 20 years.

However, we plan several breakfasts and lunches and most evening meals. All but one family will bring extra food, including snacks and their own drinks (we never know what everyone wants). Some will cook an evening meal for us while they are here. All groups will treat us to an evening meal at a local restaurant. One family also leaves us gift certificates to local businesses. We do ask that they change the beds before they leave for the next group of visitors. All are willingly do this.

We never expect all the help, but it is greatly appreciated. When one adds up the cost of extra food, disposable cups and plates and utilities for 10 weeks a year, it can be expensive.

Over the years, we have learned there are two kinds of guests: visitors and vacationers. Visitors come to see us, enjoy the lake and surroundings and help in any way they can to make their visit easier and more enjoyable for us. Vacationers are those who come to our “hotel” and restaurant and expect to be waited on while they are here. Needless to say, we don’t have “vacationers” more than once. — Visitors and Vacationers

Dear Visitors and Vacationers: I love your classification of guests as visitors and vacationers. I would take it a step farther and say that most people fall into two categories — those who are considerate of others and how they are feeling, and those who have a sense of entitlement and a lack of gratitude.

Want to know a secret? The considerate ones, the visitors, are happier people.

Dear Annie: I married a man with a son from his first marriage, who was 12 years old when we started dating. What really attracted me to my husband was the fact that he and his ex-wife were wonderful co-parents. As far as I knew, they were never mean, cruel or vindictive to each other, and it was quite apparent that they both loved their son (my stepson).

His ex was always included in family gatherings and my in-laws provided childcare for their grandson while his mother worked weekends as a nurse at the hospital. My stepson grew up knowing that he had an extended loving family. He had his mother’s family, his father’s family and my family who all welcomed and supported him. My stepson came to our state

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