Trump tests negative for Covid-19 on consecutive days, White House doctor says

Ahead of his first campaign rally since being hospitalized for Covid-19, President Donald Trump’s White House physician Dr. Sean Conley released a memo on Monday stating the president had recently tested negative on consecutive days and is no longer contagious.

Trump and the administration have repeatedly dodged questions about when the president last tested negative for the virus. Conley said in his memo a number of measures were used to test Trump and that he had tested negative on antigen tests instead of the more conclusive polymerase chain reaction test. Conley did not say on which days Trump tested negative.

“This comprehensive data, in concert with the CDC’s guidelines for removal of transmission-based precautions, have informed our medical team’s assessment that the President is not infectious to others,” Conley said in the memo.

The news comes as Trump returns to the campaign trail Monday night with a rally in Florida after he and several White House and campaign aides were infected with Covid-19. Florida is a crucial battleground state and polls show that Joe Biden, the Democratic nominee, is leading Trump. Trump won the state in 2016.

“They say I’m immune. I feel so powerful,” Trump told the crowd in Sanford. “I’ll walk into that audience, I’ll walk in there, kiss everyone in that audience. I’ll kiss the guys and the beautiful women.”

Biden on Monday held events in Ohio, another battleground state. Vice President Mike Pence was also campaigning in Ohio on Monday. However, Sen. Kamala D. Harris, D-Calif., Biden’s running mate, was not on the trail on Monday, participating instead as a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee in the confirmation hearing of Judge Amy Coney Barrett, Trump’s nominee to the Supreme Court.

Trump spent much of the day ranting on Twitter about health care and other issues after Democrats grilled Barrett over her views on the Affordable Care Act, which they argued Republicans are trying to overturn through the courts.

“Republicans must state loudly and clearly that WE are going to provide much better Healthcare at a much lower cost. Get the word out! Will always protect pre-existing conditions!!!” Trump wrote on Twitter after the committee adjourned for a lunch break.

Trump has long touted a health care plan to replace the ACA, but Republicans have failed to offer a plan that would protect pre-existing conditions. The Trump-backed GOP legislation in 2017, which failed, included state waivers that would allow insurers to charge higher prices for sicker people.

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Trump Tests Negative for Covid-19 on Consecutive Days, White House Physician Says

President Trump taking off his face mask before speaking to supporters on the South Lawn of the White House on Saturday in Washington, D.C.



Photo:

tom brenner/Reuters

President Trump tested negative for Covid-19 on consecutive days, White House physician Sean Conley said in a memo released Monday afternoon as Mr. Trump traveled to Florida for his first formal campaign rally since being treated for the virus.

Dr. Conley said tests and other measurements “have informed our medical team’s assessment that the president is not infectious to others.”

The memo didn’t specify when Mr. Trump was tested.

Mr. Trump was tested using

Abbott Laboratories’s

BinaxNOW Covid-19 Ag Card, the memo said. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted emergency-use authorization to Abbott Laboratories for a $5 rapid-response Covid-19 antigen test that is roughly the size of a credit card.

“It is important to note that this test was not used in isolation for the determination of the president’s current negative status,’’ the doctor’s memo said, adding that other data were used. “This comprehensive data, in concert with the CDC’s guidelines for removal of transmission-based precautions,” informed the team’s assessment, the memo said.

The White House has faced pressure to say more about Mr. Trump’s testing, and it has declined to say when the president last tested negative before disclosing his positive result around 1 a.m. on Oct. 2, only days after his first debate with Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden.

Write to Alex Leary at [email protected]

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The White House has dodged questions for six straight days about when Trump last tested negative for the coronavirus

At least three other White House officials have dodged the same question for six straight days, examples of which you can watch in the video above. Trump’s last negative test is one of several pieces of incomplete or contradictory information about his coronavirus infection that the White House has refused to clarify. Health experts have said the negative test information is needed to know how long Trump may have been contagious and who might have to isolate after coming into contact with him.

On Saturday, White House physician Sean Conley declined to say when Trump last tested negative.

On Tuesday, Morgenstern said he did not know when Trump last tested negative.

And by Thursday, White House communications director Alyssa Farah told reporters, “I can’t reveal that at this time, the doctors would like to keep it private.”

Earlier this week, two officials familiar with the situation told The Washington Post that Trump had not been tested daily for the virus in recent months.

In the six days before he announced his positive test Trump traveled to six cities, including to Cleveland for the first presidential debate Sept. 29.

On Friday, the nation’s top infectious-disease expert, Anthony S. Fauci, called the Barrett ceremony a “superspreader event.”

“We had a superspreader event in the White House, and it was a situation where people were crowded together and were not wearing masks,” Fauci told CBS News. “So the data speak for themselves.”

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Six RCMP officers injured on the job in Southern Interior in four days



a van parked in front of a car: According to RCMP, six front line officers were hurt on the job in B.C.'s Southern Interior in a span of four days.


© THE CANADIAN PRESS
According to RCMP, six front line officers were hurt on the job in B.C.’s Southern Interior in a span of four days.

Six RCMP officers in B.C.’s Southern Interior region have been injured on the job in a span of 96 hours, according to the RCMP Southeast District.

All of the front-line officers that got hurt were carrying out arrests of volatile individuals at the time, said a news release issued by the RCMP.

“Each of these dangerous situations has not only deeply impacted these extremely dedicated police officers, but has also had lasting implications on their families and colleagues,” said Chief Supt. Brad Haugli, RCMP Southeast District commander.

Read more: ‘I lost my soulmate’: Widow of Calgary officer strives to eliminate workplace fatalities

According to RCMP, the first incident on Oct. 3 in Grand Forks involved emergency paramedics responding to a report of an intoxicated man lying face down outside a home in the 6400-block of 18 Street.

Ambulance paramedics approached the individual, at which time RCMP said he sprung to his feet and suddenly became aggressive.

The paramedics called the Grand Forks RCMP for help.

RCMP said a front-line officer arrived and approached the man who continued to yell aggressively.

The suspect allegedly grabbed onto the officer and forced them to the ground, where he continued to assault the officer.

The suspect fled on foot before the officer could make an arrest.

Read more: Man in hospital after allegedly shooting at Surrey RCMP officer, turning gun on himself

The suspect, a 35-year-old Grand Forks man, was apprehended without further incident by another front-line officer who was responding to the scene to assist.

The police officer sustained non-life-threatening injuries and was medically assessed at the scene by the emergency paramedics who had initially called for support. The officer was later examined in hospital.

On Oct. 7,  Salmon Arm RCMP responded to a report of a disturbance inside a home, where a distraught man was reportedly experiencing a mental health crisis and causing property damage.

RCMP said a pair of uniformed officers responded to the home, and arranged to have emergency medical crews staged nearby.

According to the RCMP, they managed to de-escalate the situation and convinced the man to exit the home to obtain medical attention for the lacerations and abrasions he sustained.

RCMP said that’s when the 41-year-old Sorrento man suddenly lunged at both officers, who required the use of a Conducted Energy Weapon (CEW) to subdue him.

Both responding officers received medical treatment for non-life-threatening injuries following the arrest. One officer sustained a lower arm fracture.

Read more: Huntsville OPP search for suspect after officer injured at R.I.D.E. stop

Also on Oct 7, three officers in Kamloops suffered injuries while working together to apprehend a dangerous offender, who led police on a dangerous pursuit.

One officer sustained injuries as a result of the suspect allegedly side-swiping the officer’s cruiser.

A second officer sustained a lower arm injury after jumping out of the way

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Trump ‘fever-free’ for four days, ‘symptom-free’ for 24 hours in coronavirus fight, White House physician says

White House physician Dr. Sean Conley said in a new memo on Wednesday that President Trump has been “fever-free” for four days and has not had any symptoms of the novel coronavirus for “over 24 hours.”

“The President this morning says ‘I feel great!’,” Conley wrote in a memo to press secretary Kayleigh McEnany. “His physical exam and vital signs, including oxygen saturation and respiratory rate, all remain stable and in normal range.”

TRUMP, FIGHTING CORONAVIRUS, SAYS HE IS ‘LOOKING FORWARD’ TO DEBATE ON OCT. 15

Conley added that the president has “now been fever-free for more than 4 days, symptom-free for over 24 hours, and has not needed nor received any supplemental oxygen since initial hospitalization.”

“Of note today, the President’s labs demonstrated detectable levels of SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies from labs drawn Monday, October 5th; initial IgG levels drawn late Thursday night were undetectable,” Conley continued, adding that the president’s medical team will “continue to closely monitor” and will provide updates as necessary.

The update comes after the president was discharged from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, and returned to the White House on Monday evening, where he is continuing to be treated for COVID-19.

The president faced health scares throughout his battle with COVID-19, including two instances in which his blood oxygen level dropped suddenly. Doctors treated the president with a dose of the steroid dexamethasone in response.

Conley said that Trump had a “high fever” and a blood oxygen level below 94% on Friday and during “another episode” on Saturday.

But by Saturday, Conley said the president’s cardiac, kidney and liver functions were normal, and that the president was not on oxygen and was not having any difficulty breathing or walking.

Conley said over the weekend that the president had received an antibody cocktail, as well as zinc, Vitamin D, famotidine, melatonin and a daily aspirin, along with his five-day course of Remdesivir.

TRUMP DISCHARGED FROM WALTER REED, RETURNS TO WHITE HOUSE TO CONTINUE FIGHTING COVID-19

The president, according to his medical team, was set to receive his final dose of Remdesivir at the White House on Tuesday.

Meanwhile, first lady Melania Trump, who also tested positive for COVID-19, tweeted Monday saying she is “feeling good.”

“My family is grateful for all of the prayers & support!” she tweeted Monday. “I am feeling good & will continue to rest at home.

Also on Monday, White House press secretary McEnany announced that she had tested positive for COVID-19.

Other White House staff who have tested positive for COVID-19 at this point include senior adviser Hope Hicks, Stephen Miller and director of Oval Office operations Nick Luna. Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien also tested positive for COVID-19.

Former counselor to the president Kellyanne Conway has also tested positive and former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, who participated in debate prep with the president recently, did too and was admitted to the hospital over the weekend.

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Days before Rose Garden ceremony, Mike Pence met with maskless Republicans in Cobb County

Actually, you shouldn’t.

Perdue had made the same claim the previous day in a national radio interview. This weekend, the Georgia Republican Party picked up the accusation in a flyer apparently aimed at suburban women in metro Atlanta.

“Outrageously false,” ruled the Washington Post in a fact-check published this morning. Perdue and other Republicans are basing their claim on an account of the 2017 race for the Sixth District congressional seat that the CPUSA posted on its Facebook page:

“The Communist Party did not endorse him,” said Roberta Wood, a CPUSA board member. “It does not endorse candidates of other political parties.” She added, “Posting an article on Facebook does not mean it is an endorsement.”

The newspaper gave him Four Pinocchios:

“At this point, labeling a Democrat a “communist” is almost worthy of parody. But it’s especially smarmy when the “endorsement” he claims is based on a three-year-old Facebook post of a news article. Perdue should be ashamed of himself — and he should apologize.”

Perdue and super PACs behind his campaign have also relentlessly — and falsely — claimed that Ossoff wants to defund police, even as the Democrat has denied that’s the case. And we recently told you of a Senate Leadership Fund’s out-of-bounds attempt to portray Ossoff as a terrorist sympathizer.

Never mind the polls. This barrage is all the evidence you need that this U.S. Senate race is a tight one.

***

Peach County, Ga., adjacent to both Bibb and Houston counties in middle Georgia, was named as one of 10 bellwether counties to watch on election night in a piece by David Wasserman, an editor at the Cook Political Report. The piece was written for the New York Times:

The population is 52 percent white and 44 percent Black, and its voting is racially polarized. In 2012, Peach County voted by seven points for Mr. Obama. But in 2016, Black turnout dropped sharply, and Mr. Trump won it by three points. Peach County could be a good indicator of whether the addition of Senator Kamala Harris to Mr. Biden’s ticket improves Black turnout.

***

About a month ago, the Georgia Forestry Commission announced that Deputy Director Gary White had been appointed interim director by Gov. Brian Kemp, citing the departure of Director Charles Williams. This morning, the Athens Banner-Herald tells us the rest of the story:

The director of the Georgia Forestry Commission was arrested in August on a shoplifting charge in Jones County, the Athens Banner-Herald learned Monday. The Gray Police Department arrested Charles ‘Chuck’ Williams, 64, of Watkinsville on the misdemeanor charge Aug. 13, the day after the alleged shoplifting took place in the Ace Hardware store in Gray.

***

Joe Biden’s Democratic presidential campaign launched three separate TV ads in Georgia and five other battleground states on Tuesday, aiming to increase turnout among Black voters in his quest to unseat President Donald Trump.

The spots come as polls in Georgia show Biden with about 85% of support

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White House is not tracing contacts of guests and staff at Rose Garden event 10 days ago: New York Times

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The White House has decided not to trace the contacts of guests and staff members at a Rose Garden event 10 days ago for Judge Amy Coney Barrett, where at least eight people, including President Donald Trump, may have been infected, the New York Times reported, citing a White House official familiar with the plans. Instead, it is limiting efforts to notifying people who came into close contact with Trump the two days before he tested positive on Thursday evening, the paper reported. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which has had a contact tracing team ready, has been cut out of the process. The White House official said the White House is following CDC guidelines that recommend focusing on contacts within a two-day window from diagnosis. But health experts said it was irresponsible to ignore the earlier event. “You cannot argue against the fact that five or six people who attended that event all got infected, unless you argue that that was all random chance,” Dr. Yvonne Maldonado, an epidemiologist and contact tracing expert told the Times. “There were a lot of people working at that event, and so they need to be contact tracing that whole event.” Health experts have lamented the U.S. failure to conduct the contact tracing, isolation and quarantine procedures that have helped some countries and regions contain the spread of the deadly illness.

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Three Days After Trump’s COVID Diagnosis, White House Tells Staff With Symptoms to Stay Home

The White House has told staff that if they are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19, they should stay home. The advice comes a full three days after President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump tested positive for the virus.

An all-staff email sent on Sunday urges anyone with COVID symptoms to “please stay home” and “do not come to work.” The email also tells any staff with symptoms to “immediately contact your primary care provider” and “inform [your] supervisors.”

The email was obtained by New York Magazine‘s Washington Correspondent Olivia Nuzzi. She took to Twitter to point out that the advice came only after the president was admitted to Walter Reed Medical Center with the disease.

“Three days after the public learned about President Trump’s COVID-19 infection and the viruses spread through the White House and federal government, WH staff finally received an email telling them what to do if they have symptoms,” Nuzzi wrote.

The email says, in part: “If you or your colleagues believe that you should be practicing telework, or have questions about your ability to do so, please contact your supervisor.”

Nuzzi also noted confusion and even anger at the White House about the way the administration handled the president’s diagnosis. There has been significant criticism about mixed messaging surrounding his illness.

“[A] senior White House official was angry that staff had been kept in the dark, that nobody had been told what to do about the virus spreading rapidly in their own workplace,” Nuzzi said.

There was criticism of how the Trump administration was dealing with COVID-19 even before the president’s diagnosis. His decision to mock former Vice President Joe Biden for wearing a mask at the first presidential debate contrasted with reports that mask-wearing isn’t required at the White House and there are no plans to make it mandatory.

“Our standard protocol is CDC best practices and recommendations,” a White House official told Axioson October 2. “Facial coverings are recommended but not required. There’s hand sanitizing stations located throughout the complex, frequent washing of hands and good hygiene is strongly recommended and social distancing is encouraged. So, I don’t foresee those things changing.”

In a video posted on Sunday, Trump said he’d learned more about COVID since his admission to Walter Reed. He also briefly left the hospital for a short drive where he waved at supporters.

“It’s been a very interesting journey. I learned a lot about COVID. I learned it by really going to school. This is the real school. This isn’t the ‘let’s read the books’ school,” Trump said in a video

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Trump Says He Didn’t Want to Stay Locked in White House But Will Spend Next Few Days In Military Hospital Suite

President Donald Trump said he didn’t want to be locked up in the White House following his COVID-19 diagnosis, but will now spend the next few days in a special suite at a military hospital.



a man wearing a suit and tie talking on a cell phone: U.S. President Donald Trump leaves the White House for Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on the South Lawn of the White House on October 2, 2020 in Washington, D.C.


© Drew Angerer/Getty Images
U.S. President Donald Trump leaves the White House for Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on the South Lawn of the White House on October 2, 2020 in Washington, D.C.

The president arrived at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland on Friday just a day after news emerged that he had tested positive for the disease.

On Saturday, Trump released a video message from his suite, saying he had “no choice” but to leave the White House.

“I just didn’t want to stay in the White House, I was given that alternative. Stay in the White House, lock yourself in, don’t ever leave. Don’t even go to the Oval Office, just stay upstairs and enjoy it. Don’t see people, don’t talk to people and just be done with it. And i can’t do that, I had to be out front,” he said.

Election Day 2020: Where Trump, Biden Stand In The Polls 30 Days Before Nov. 3

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“This is America, this is the greatest country in the world, this is the most powerful country in the world. I can’t be locked up in a room upstairs and totally safe, and just say, ‘Hey, whatever happens, happens. I can’t do that. As a leader you have to confront problems.”

Trump will now work out of his suite for the next “few days” out of an “abundance of caution,” White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany said in a statement.

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In the video, Trump said he was “doing well” while adding that the “real test” would come in the next few days.

“I came here, wasn’t feeling so well, I feel much better now. We’re working hard to get me all the way back. I’ll be back, I think I’ll be back soon, and I look forward to finishing up the campaign the way it was started and the way we’ve been doing and the kind of numbers that we’ve been doing.”

Due to his age and weight, the 74-year-old president is in one of the highest risk categories for COVID-19. In the video message, he said his wife Melania Trump—who is 24 years his junior—was “doing very well” after she also tested positive for COVID-19.

“Melania is really handling it very nicely. As you’ve probably read, she’s slightly younger than me—just a little tiny bit—and therefore, just, we know the disease, we know the situation with age versus younger people, and Melania is handling it statistically like it’s supposed to be handled. And that makes me very happy, and it makes the country very happy,” he said.

Toward the end of May, as hundreds of Americans protested outside the White House following the

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White House physician walks back a confusing timeline of Trump’s coronavirus infection that implied he was diagnosed days before announcing his test results



a man wearing a suit and tie: President Donald Trump disembarks from the Marine One helicopter followed by White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows as he arrives at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after the White House announced that he "will be working from the presidential offices at Walter Reed for the next few days" after testing positive for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), Joshua Roberts/Reuters


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President Donald Trump disembarks from the Marine One helicopter followed by White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows as he arrives at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after the White House announced that he “will be working from the presidential offices at Walter Reed for the next few days” after testing positive for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), Joshua Roberts/Reuters

White House physician Sean Conley offered a new timeline for the president’s coronavirus infection during a press briefing Saturday morning. He later walked back the statement.

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Conley held the briefing to review President Donald Trump’s condition after he was hospitalized at Walter Reed Medical Center on Friday evening. The physician said Trump’s condition had improved, but he also said the president’s COVID-19 infection had been identified a day earlier than previously thought.

“Just 72 hours into the diagnosis now,” Conley said. “The first week of COVID, and in particular days 7 to 10, are the most critical in determining the likely course of this illness.”

That would mean that Trump had been diagnosed on Wednesday.

Dr. Brian Garibaldi, a physician on the team caring for the president at Walter Reed, also said that Trump had received an experimental antibody treatment “48 hours ago,” which would be roughly Thursday morning.

This was a different timeline than the one constructed by incremental statements from the White House. Trump announced his positive test results early Friday morning, and the White House disclosed his experimental antibody treatment later that day.

When asked to clarify, Conley contradicted his earlier statement.

“Thursday afternoon following the news of a close contact is when we repeated testing, and given kind of clinical indications had a little bit more concern. And that’s when late that night we got the PCR confirmation that he was [positive],” he said.

Shortly after the briefing, Conley released a statement retracting his initial timeline from the press briefing, saying he “incorrectly” said 72 hours instead of “day three” and 48 hours instead of “day two.” (Even though Garibaldi said “48 hours,” not Conley himself.)

“The President was first diagnosed with COVID-19 on the evening of Thursday, October 1st and had received Regeron’s antibody cocktail on Friday, October 2nd,” the statement said.

The company that makes the antibody treatment is called Regeneron.

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