Family killed in Oxford A40 crash ‘were moving house’

Zoe Powell from Chinnor, Oxfordshire, with her husband Josh and their three children. (Sarah Mak Photography)
Zoe Powell from Chinnor, Oxfordshire, with her husband Josh and their three children. (Sarah Mak Photography)

A family who lost a mother and three children in a car crash near Oxford had recently moved because their house burned down, according to a report.

The four victims, named in the media as Zoe Powell, 29, daughters Amelia, four, and Phoebe, eight, and six-year-old son Simeon, all died in an incident on the A40 Monday evening.

Police said the collision involved their Subaru people carrier and a heavy goods vehicle.

Two other passengers in the Subaru, reported as Powell’s 30-year-old husband Josh and their 18-month old daughter, were taken to hospital in Oxford and are in a critical condition.

Thames Valley Police said the driver of the HGV, a 56-year-old man, suffered minor injuries.

Zoe Powell was named as a victim of the A40 crash. (Sarah Mak Photography)
Zoe Powell was named as a victim of the A40 crash. (Sarah Mak Photography)

The Sun reported that William Milroy, Zoe Powell’s father, said the family, who were living in Chinnor, Oxfordshire, had been moving from house to house but recently began renting a long-term place.

“They were going home. I don’t know where they had been but they had recently moved into a new rented house after theirs had burned down,” he said.

Zoe Powell ran a blog website about being a mother, oriented towards the mental health and wellbeing of mums.

A police witness appeal sign on the A40 near Oxford where a four-year-old girl, a six-year-old boy, an eight-year-old girl and a 29-year-old woman from Chinnor, Oxfordshire, died Monday night after a collision between a people carrier and a heavy goods vehicle.
A police witness appeal sign on the A40 near Oxford where a four-year-old girl, a six-year-old boy, an eight-year-old girl and a 29-year-old woman died. (PA)

She would write about coping when a child is ill, dealing with new challenges and promoting the use of a journal to record events and feelings.

The mother also made videos for Youtube in which she talked about writing down thoughts.

Police were called to the collision at 9.50pm on Monday, with emergency services arriving at what police described as “an extremely upsetting scene”.

Thames Valley Police’s Sergeant Dominic Mahon said: “We will leave no stone unturned to ascertain what has caused this tragedy.

The A40 near Oxford where a four-year-old girl, a six-year-old boy, an eight-year-old girl and a 29-year-old woman from Chinnor, Oxfordshire, died Monday night after a collision between a people carrier and a heavy goods vehicle.
An an aerial view of the A40, where the incident took place. (PA)
Damage to road barriers on the A40 near Oxford where a four-year-old girl, a six-year-old boy, an eight-year-old girl and a 29-year-old woman from Chinnor, Oxfordshire, died Monday night after a collision between a people carrier and a heavy goods vehicle.
Damage to road barriers on the A40. (PA)

“The next of kin of the family have been made aware and are being supported by specially trained family liaison officers.

“The thoughts of all of us at Thames Valley Police, along with our partners who have assisted at the scene or at the hospital, are with the families at this incredibly difficult time.”

He urged against speculating about what happened and asked for anyone who saw what happened to call 101 or make a report online using reference number 43200321914.

Chinnor Parish Council said on Facebook it was “saddened and shocked” by the crash and said a space for flowers to be laid has been made on the village high street.

Oxford City Council’s leader Susan Brown said is was “horrible, horrible news”.

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Georgia elementary school dedicates butterfly garden to educator killed in crash

The chase began when Georgia State Patrol troopers tried to stop a Mini Cooper, which they clocked going 95 mph on I-75 in Gordon County, the state agency said in a statement. The driver, identified as 20-year-old Christopher Tyler Parker, allegedly refused to stop and continued south. He exited the interstate at Union Grove Road before continuing south on U.S. 41, the GSP said.

ExploreBartow County educator killed during police chase known to students as ‘mom’

Investigators said Parker ran a red light at the intersection of Ga. 140 and smashed into the side of Townsend’s Buick. After the collision, Townsend’s car was sent into the back of a Dodge pickup truck, causing minor injuries to the truck’s driver.

The GSP determined the Mini Cooper had been stolen from Parker’s grandmother. Parker was arrested at the scene and faces charges of vehicular homicide, fleeing and attempting to elude, receiving stolen property and bringing stolen property across state lines.

“Mrs. Townsend was such an amazing part of the White Elementary family,” Heater said in the days following the paraprofessional’s death. “She was truly a devoted staff member who put the needs of our children before her very own. She always had an amazing smile, sense of humor, and a determined, unbreakable spirit. She is going to be missed dearly.”

More than 15 community partners stepped in to provide planters, mulch and soil, Heater said. Townsend’s parents, Jim and Sandra Walker, said the act left them “speechless.”

“This was an overwhelming feeling for us,” they said, “and we felt that was the sweetest way to honor her. She loved White Elementary and her students.”

The community placed two rose bushes in the garden, Heater said, adding that they were Townsend’s “favorite pollinating plants.” It also contains gardenia bushes, a walking trail and a seating area for White Elementary classes to take part in outdoor learning.

The elementary school’s garden club will maintain it, she added.

“Angie would be overjoyed and say, ‘Y’all didn’t have to do all of this,’ and would just sit down and cry,” the Walkers said. “I don’t think she would imagine that she meant so much to so many people.”

REMEMBERING ANGIE TOWNSEND: White Elementary School Art Teacher Bridgette Ballard felt led to paint this picture of our beloved Angie. It captures Angie’s love of children perfectly.

Posted by Bartow County Schools on Thursday, October 8, 2020

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Boris Johnson’s 95% mortgages will put Britain back on course for a house price crash | Josh Ryan-Collins | Opinion

This week Boris Johnson boasted that his government would “turn generation rent into generation buy” via a return to 95% mortgages for first-time buyers. In other words, easier credit to help more people buy houses.

To say we have been here before would be an understatement of epic proportions. Since the days of Margaret Thatcher, every UK government has sought to cut through the housing affordability problem with the easy and politically popular option of subsidising the demand for homeownership. Generally, this has taken the form of liberalising mortgage regulation or providing direct government subsidies for first-time buyers, most recently the various help-to-buy schemes. All have failed to bring down the price of homes.

More demand for homeownership leads to more more credit flowing into an inherently limited supply of homes. Most housing in the UK is provided at market rates by private landlords and private sector developers. These groups have no incentive to increase the supply of housing to match this increase in demand, since they generate their profits from increasing, not decreasing, prices.

The result, inevitably, is house price inflation. As result, homeownership for younger adults on middle incomes has halved in the UK in the last two decades. Similar outcomes have been seen in other advanced economies – more mortgage credit does not stimulate supply when the provision of housing is left to the market.

British politicians and policymakers seem unable to recognise these simple facts. Indeed, it took a massive financial crisis over a decade ago for politicians to allow the tightening of mortgage regulation in any significant way. Johnson may not be aware of the fact that there were quite a few 95% mortgages around leading up to the housing bubble that precipitated the UK’s 2007-9 banking crisis. The resulting economic catastrophe led to them being phased out. Along with other restrictions on borrowing, these policies helped dampen the growth of UK house prices and household debt (currently around 85% of GDP, down from a record 95% in 2009), although it has been increasing again in recent years.

One can only imagine the Bank of England’s reaction to Johnson’s announcement. The Bank has been carefully nurturing its post-crisis financial stability mandate and delicately implementing “macroprudential policy” powers to stifle excessive lending in the domestic and corporate real estate sector. Johnson clearly doesn’t see much value in such an approach when there are votes to be won.

The UK remains locked in a self-defeating “doom loop”: falling levels of homeownership lead governments to loosen mortgage regulation, resulting in increasing household debt and house prices, leading to a housing bubble and eventually a financial crisis, leading to stricter mortgage regulation, which is then blamed for falling homeownership and so on.

What then is the solution? Do the opposite of current policy. Reduce, rather than increase, the demand for homeownership, and in particular the demand for housing as a financial asset. Implement higher and fairer property or land value taxes that reduce unearned capital gains that generally

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Boris Johnson’s 95% mortgages will put Britain back on course for a house price crash

This week Boris Johnson boasted that his government would “turn generation rent into generation buy” via a return to 95% mortgages for first-time buyers. In other words, easier credit to help more people buy houses.



a person standing in front of a store: Photograph: Guy Bell/REX/Shutterstock


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Guy Bell/REX/Shutterstock

To say we have been here before would be an understatement of epic proportions. Since the days of Margaret Thatcher, every UK government has sought to cut through the housing affordability problem with the easy and politically popular option of subsidising the demand for homeownership. Generally, this has taken the form of liberalising mortgage regulation or providing direct government subsidies for first-time buyers, most recently the various help-to-buy schemes. All have failed to bring down the price of homes.

More demand for homeownership leads to more more credit flowing into an inherently limited supply of homes. Most housing in the UK is provided at market rates by private landlords and private sector developers. These groups have no incentive to increase the supply of housing to match this increase in demand, since they generate their profits from increasing, not decreasing, prices.

Related: Lenders left wondering how PM’s homeowners pledge will be achieved

The result, inevitably, is house price inflation. As result, homeownership for younger adults on middle incomes has halved in the UK in the last two decades. Similar outcomes have been seen in other advanced economies – more mortgage credit does not stimulate supply when the provision of housing is left to the market.

British politicians and policymakers seem unable to recognise these simple facts. Indeed, it took a massive financial crisis over a decade ago for politicians to allow the tightening of mortgage regulation in any significant way. Johnson may not be aware of the fact that there were quite a few 95% mortgages around leading up to the housing bubble that precipitated the UK’s 2007-9 banking crisis. The resulting economic catastrophe led to them being phased out. Along with other restrictions on borrowing, these policies helped dampen the growth of UK house prices and household debt (currently around 85% of GDP, down from a record 95% in 2009), although it has been increasing again in recent years.



a person standing in front of a store: ‘Homeownership for younger adults on middle incomes has halved in the UK in the last two decades.’


© Photograph: Guy Bell/REX/Shutterstock
‘Homeownership for younger adults on middle incomes has halved in the UK in the last two decades.’

One can only imagine the Bank of England’s reaction to Johnson’s announcement. The Bank has been carefully nurturing its post-crisis financial stability mandate and delicately implementing “macroprudential policy” powers to stifle excessive lending in the domestic and corporate real estate sector. Johnson clearly doesn’t see much value in such an approach when there are votes to be won.

The UK remains locked in a self-defeating “doom loop”: falling levels of homeownership lead governments to loosen mortgage regulation, resulting in increasing household debt and house prices, leading to a housing bubble and eventually a financial crisis, leading to stricter mortgage regulation, which is then blamed for falling homeownership and so on.

What then is the solution? Do the

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Driver Of Stolen Pickup Truck In Boston Public Garden Crash Arrested

BOSTON (CBS) – A homeless man has been charged in a horrific pickup truck crash at the entrance to the Boston Public Garden that left a woman critically hurt. Keith Andrade, 58  was ordered held on $20,000 bail at his arraignment in municipal court Friday afternoon.

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According to WBZ-TV I-Team sources, a firefighter left the truck running outside the Boylston Street fire station Thursday afternoon when a man stole it and took off. A short time later, it crashed through the garden gate at the corner of Boylston and Charles Street South.

A woman who had been walking on the sidewalk was pinned under the debris. A nurse and a doctor rushed to help her before she was taken to the hospital with life-threatening injuries.

“She grabbed the victim’s hand in an attempt to pull her out of the way.  She tripped on her high heel and was consequently unable to get out of the way to avoid being struck,” said prosecutor Colleen O’Neill.

According to the police report, she was entering the garden with a friend when they heard a “loud sound” and saw a pickup truck coming at them at a “rapid rate of speed.” The woman tripped on a high heel and couldn’t get out of the way before she was hit.

Witnesses said the driver, later identified by police as Andrade, simply walked away.

About four hours later, police said they found the man who fit the description of the driver at Washington Street and School Street. When officers approached him they said he gave them another name. Police discovered he had two active warrants for larceny and arrested him.

Andrade is facing several charges including larceny of a motor vehicle, assault and battery with a dangerous weapon and leaving the scene of an accident.

In court Friday, Andrade’s attorney said his client has been misidentified.

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Pedestrian hurt in pickup truck crash at entrance to Boston Public Garden







Pedestrian hurt in pickup truck crash at entrance to Boston Public Garden

Police were investigating a crash involving a pedestrian and pickup truck at one of the entrances to the Boston Public Garden in Boston.



a truck on a city street: A photo of a pick-up truck involved in a crash at the entrance to the Boston Public Garden at the corner of Boylston and Charles Street


© Twitter/Charley A
A photo of a pick-up truck involved in a crash at the entrance to the Boston Public Garden at the corner of Boylston and Charles Street

The crash happened at the corner of Boylston and Charles Streets just before 5 p.m Thursday.


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Photos from the scene showed the Chevy Colorado pickup truck on the sidewalk at the entrance to the garden with severe front end damage. It appeared that several granite stone fixtures were knocked down.

Boston Police said the pedestrian suffered life-threatening injuries. A witness said the victim was pinned beneath the vehicle.

No additional information was immediately available.

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READ THE FULL STORY:Pedestrian hurt in pickup truck crash at entrance to Boston Public Garden

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Will a Housing Market Crash Affect Home Depot Stock?

Will the housing market crash again? Maybe. Many aspects of the economy are cyclical, and housing prices do occasionally fall. Is a housing crash imminent? That’s harder to answer.

Some have sounded the alarm on housing for good reason. Consider the famous Case-Shiller Home Price Index, an inflation-adjusted metric created by Standard & Poor’s tracking housing prices. The index’s value was 100 back in the year 2000 and had been close to 100 when applying the index’s criteria backward to the 20th century. But since 2000, it has risen above 180 on two occasions. The first time preceded the housing crash of the Great Recession.

The second time the Case-Shiller index exceeded 180 is right now. In reality, it passed the mark way back in 2016, and it’s currently around 215. So no need to panic: Crossing 180 doesn’t immediately flip a housing-crash switch. It just shows housing prices have gone up a lot. The bigger problem, though, is how much faster home values are growing relative to average income. Consider the data over just the last 10 years.

Case-Shiller Home Price Index: National Chart

Data by YCharts.

It’s probably unsustainable for home values to outpace personal income long term. Eventually people could be priced out of affordable housing, and that could spark a housing market correction. Will that affect companies like Home Depot (NYSE:HD)?

To answer that, we can start by going back to the Great Recession. 

A model house sits atop Jenga blocks while a businessman removes a piece, creating instability.

Image source: Getty Images.

The last time Home Depot’s revenue fell

Home Depot’s revenue fell from 2007 to 2009. In fiscal 2006, when things were going well, the company generated $90.8 billion in full-year net sales. In fiscal 2009, it generated just $66.2 billion — down 27% over three years. Likewise, net earnings took a hit as the company lost operating leverage from lower sales per location. Net earnings fell a whopping 55% from $5.8 billion in 2006 to $2.6 billion in 2009.

The Case-Shiller index fell 20% from the beginning of 2007 to the end of 2009, and it’s tempting to attribute Home Depot’s slumping results entirely to plunging home values. Results from Lowe’s (NYSE:LOW) lend credibility to this theory. In fiscal 2007, Lowe’s sales at existing stores, known as comparable sales, fell 5.1%. This is similar to Home Depot’s 6.7% comps decline that same year.

But this is correlation, not causation. Consider that home values were already going down in 2006 when Home Depot’s sales were still up. Furthermore, the Case-Shiller index fell another 7% from the beginning of 2010 through the end of 2011. By contrast, both Home Depot and Lowe’s had already returned to revenue growth.

To summarize, home values and revenue for home-improvement retail don’t always track in the same direction. And that makes sense. Regular home maintenance doesn’t stop just because the value of a home drops.

Wooden blocks spell the word risk.

Image source: Getty Images.

The greater risk

There were multiple other issues affecting Home Depot’s revenue in the Great Recession, including high unemployment, lack of credit, and a construction slowdown. But that last factor

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At least 22 dead in military plane crash in eastern Ukraine, Interior Ministry reports

At least 22 people have died in a military plane crash in Ukraine, the country’s interior ministry has confirmed.

Two other people are severely injured and four more are still unaccounted for, the ministry said in a statement.

The crash occurred at around 20:50 local time (19:50 CET) near the eastern city of Chuhuyiv, in the Kharkiv region, some two kilometres away from a military airport.

The 28 people on board the AN-26 plane were military pilots and cadets of the Kozhedub Air Force University. The ministry had initially said that 24 people were on the plane when it crashed.

Units of the Ministry of Internal Affairs, as well as emergency crews, were dispatched at the site with the area cordoned off by police.

Flames which had engulfed the plane were eventually extinguished shortly before 10 pm local time.

President Volodymyr Zelenskyy announced in a Facebook post that a government commission had been tasked with investigating “all the circumstances and causes” of the crash.

He described the incident as “a terrible tragedy” and said he will visit the scene on Saturday.

The Antonov AN-26 is a twin-engined turboprop civilian and military aircraft manufactured near Kyiv between 1969 and 1986 when Ukraine was still part of the Soviet Union.

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22 killed in Ukraine military plane crash: interior ministry – News

At least two people injured and taken to hospital in a serious condition, and the search continues for others.

A military transport plane carrying 28 people crashed and burst into flames in north=eastern Ukraine on Friday evening, killing at least 22 people on board, officials said.

Rescue workers were on the scene. Air force pilots and cadets were on the plane, the interior ministry said.

At least two people were injured and taken to hospital in a serious condition, and the search continued for the others, Deputy Interior Minister Anton Gerashchenko said.

The crash happened around 2 km (1.2 miles) from a military airport, the State Emergency Service of Ukraine said in a statement.

“The bodies of 22 people were found, two people were injured and the search for four people continues,” it said.

The plane was on a training flight, President Volodymyr Zelenskiy said in statement, citing preliminary information.


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Driver killed, 2 others hurt in crash along Garden State Parkway

A Jersey City man was killed and two of his passengers were injured when the vehicle they were riding in struck a tree along the Garden State Parkway in Atlantic County on Sunday, authorities said.



a car parked in a parking lot: New Jersey State Police car


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New Jersey State Police car

The wreck occurred shortly before 5 p.m. on the highway’s northbound side, near milepost 38.1 in Egg Harbor Township, according to Trooper Charles Marchan, a spokesman for the New Jersey State Police. A Chevrolet was headed north when it went off the highway and crashed into a tree.

The Chevrolet driver, Jacquim Lovely, 38, was killed, the spokesman said. Two others – a 42-year-old woman and a 41-year-old man, both of Jersey City – were hurt.

An investigation was ongoing, according to the State Police. More information was not immediately released late Sunday.

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Noah Cohen may be reached at [email protected]

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