Queen Elizabeth II Could Be Removed by More Countries as the ‘House of Cards Falls’

Queen Elizabeth II could face a rash of countries removing her as head of state with Barbados causing the “house of cards” to fall, a royal expert has told Newsweek.



Elizabeth II wearing a wedding cake: Queen Elizabeth II talks to guests at an evening reception for members of the Diplomatic Corps at Buckingham Palace on December 11, 2019 in London, England. The monarch now faces Barbados removing her as its head of state.


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Queen Elizabeth II talks to guests at an evening reception for members of the Diplomatic Corps at Buckingham Palace on December 11, 2019 in London, England. The monarch now faces Barbados removing her as its head of state.

The Caribbean island announced plans on Tuesday to remove the queen as its head of state and achieve “full sovereignty” before the 55th anniversary of independence from the U.K. in November 2021.

The move has triggered speculation of a domino effect among pro- and anti-monarchy commentators alike.

Jamaica is widely tipped as the next country to remove the queen, although the opposition People’s National Party lost a general election earlier this month after promising a referendum on becoming a republic.

Ingrid Seward, author of upcoming biography Prince Philip Revealed, told Newsweek: “I thought that was really sad about Barbados.

“I’d been there a lot because I had friends that lived there and they always seemed to like the queen.

“It seems to me that once one country goes the house of cards falls a little bit.”

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle recently called for the Commonwealth, made up predominantly of countries in the former British Empire, to have a conversation about the past in order to move on from colonialism.

However, Seward said she believed he may also have contributed to the problem with his own past behavior, including an infamous incident in which he wore Nazi

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Researchers discover both good and bad kitchen habits in different European countries

Every year, 5,000 Europeans die from diseases contracted from food. Researchers visited people’s homes and discovered both good and bad kitchen habits in different European countries.

Most of us know that we have to be careful about hygiene when preparing raw chicken. We should wash the utensils and our hands after handling chicken, and we should wash or use a different chopping board before chopping the vegetables for the salad.

There is a lot happening at the same time in the kitchen, and it is not always easy to remember to follow good hygiene advice.

‘We have to remember that cooking is a complex social practice that is based more on routinised habits than on food safety advice’, says Researcher Silje Skuland at Consumption Research Norway (SIFO), OsloMet – Oslo Metropolitan University.

Together with researchers in Norway, the UK, France, Portugal and Romania, she has mapped the shopping, hygiene and cooking habits of 75 European households. This is part of the big European research project SafeConsume, which is concerned with reducing the risk of foodborne diseases in private kitchens.

Everything you want to know

The work has resulted in an 800-page-long report on ‘everything you want to know about how food safety is addressed in everyday lives’, down to the smallest details.

Some of the questions the report answers are:

How do we wash lettuce? How and how often do we wash our hands? How do we wash our knives, chopping boards and other utensils? How do we transport, store and prepare our food? How do culture, habits and access to goods determine what we buy and how we prepare our food?

Comparisons between the five countries give the researchers knowledge about what food habits lead to the spread of bacteria and parasites.

Not just up to the consumers

WHO has determined that 23 million Europeans become ill and 5,000 die each year as a result of bacteria, parasites, allergens or toxins in food. Food’s journey from retail to fork has not been the subject of much research.

Skuland emphasises that consumers are not the only ones responsible for this.

‘It’s not the consumers’ fault that the food they buy in the shop contains Campylobacter bacteria or listeria. There is a tendency these days for consumers to be given the responsibility for fixing both environmental problems and public health challenges,’ says Skuland.

Skuland believes the food should already be safe when it ends up in our shopping bags. However, after the point of purchase consumers can minimise the risk by avoiding contamination and cooking meat well. 40% of cases of foodborne illness are caused by in the domestic setting.

Multitasking and cooking

The researchers went along when people did their shopping and followed them home to their kitchen where they prepared a meal of chicken and fresh vegetables. The goal was to find out how food was handled on its way from the shop to the table, which has

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