Michelle Obama claims Trump White House doing what she, her husband never could’ve ‘gotten away with’

Former first lady Michelle Obama took a swipe at the Trump White House this week in an episode of “The Michelle Obama Podcast” on Spotify.

Obama claimed she and her husband, former President Barack Obama, faced too much pressure from their “community” to be able to replicate unspecified actions of the Trump administration.

“When we were in the White House, we could’ve never gotten away with some of the stuff that’s going on now,” she said.

“Not because of the public,” she added, “but our community wouldn’t have accepted that. You worked, you did your best every day. You showed up.”

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Obama, 56, was joined on the podcast by her mother, Marian Robinson, 83, and her older brother, Craig Robinson, 58, in a discussion that was mostly about parenting, according to The Hill.

Part of the conversation dealt with interactions between African-Americans and police officers – including an incident from the family’s own experience.

Craig Robinson, an executive director with the National Association of Basketball Coaches, talked about having police once accuse him of stealing his own bicycle when he was a young boy.

Robinson said the incident left him disillusioned because he was “always taught that the police are your friends … and they’ll believe the truth.”

He later claimed that the police officers may have acted differently had they known they’d soon be facing his mother, according to People magazine.

“You know how Mom is,” he said to Michelle. “Mom was like, ‘Go in the house.’ You know how when she’s ready to talk to somebody, she’s like, ‘All right, go in the house.’ And all I could think of was: This dude’s about to get it.”

Michelle Obama added that many people she knows have had “some kind of incident where they were just minding their own business but living Black, and got accused of something.”

She added that many Black families teach their children “you’ve got to be better than, you’ve got to be 10 times better than” others, because of prejudice and mistreatment they will likely face in life.

The former first lady added that such experiences among Blacks help explain the unrest that has erupted across the nation since the May 25 death of George Floyd in police custody in Minneapolis.

“The fact that there are people out there that treat us less than, when we’re working so hard to be better than, that’s where the pain comes from,” Obama said. “That’s what these young people are so angry about.”

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Earlier this week, some conservatives called on Barack and Michelle Obama to use their connections with the streaming service Netflix to combat the controversial film “Cuties,” which critics say sexualizes and exploits young girls.

The Obamas in 2019 signed a deal said to be worth $50 million to produce content for Netflix, which has been streaming “Cuties.”

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‘We could’ve never gotten away with’ what the Trump White House does

Michelle Obama says as Black Americans, she and former President Obama “never could’ve gotten away with some of the stuff that’s going on now” in the White House because their “community wouldn’t have accepted that.”



Michelle Obama smiling for the camera: Michelle Obama: 'We could've never gotten away with' what the Trump White House does


© Greg Nash
Michelle Obama: ‘We could’ve never gotten away with’ what the Trump White House does

The former first lady opened up about race in an episode of her eponymous Spotify podcast released this week.

Speaking with her mother, Marian Robinson, and her brother, Craig Robinson, in a show focused on parenting, Obama recalled the time as a child when her older sibling got stopped by the police.

“You were riding down the street and you got stopped by the police, and they accused you of stealing your own bike,” Obama remembered. “And they would not believe you, to the point where you were like, ‘Take me to my home.'”

Craig Robinson, now an executive director of the National Association of Basketball Coaches, said the incident when he was 10 or 11 years old was “terrifying” and left him “heartbroken,” especially because he was “always taught that the police are your friends … and they’ll believe the truth.”

“What a lot of folks who are not in our position don’t understand is that this is such a way of life when it comes to interacting with the rest of the world,” Obama said. “It doesn’t matter who you are and what kind of values you have, nobody thinks about the fact that we all come from good families that are trying to teach values.”

“When you leave the safety of your home and go out into the street, where being Black is a crime in and of itself, we have all had to learn how to operate outside of our homes with a level of caution and fear, because you never know,” Obama, 56, added.

Obama said “almost everybody” she knows has had “some kind of incident where they were just minding their own business but living Black, and got accused of something.”

From a young age, Obama said, Black children are taught that people will assume the worst in them because of their race.

“So you’ve got to be better than, you’ve got to be 10-times better than,” she said.

“When we were in the White House, we could’ve never gotten away with some of the stuff that’s going on now, not because of the public, but our community wouldn’t have accepted that. You worked, you did your best every day. You showed up,” Obama said.

Referring to nationwide protests against systemic racism and police brutality sparked by the May death of George Floyd while in the custody of Minneapolis police, Obama said, “The fact that there are people out there that treat us less than, when we’re working so hard to be better than, that’s where the pain comes from. That’s what these young people are so angry about.”

“The notion that people are out there wondering about these protests,” Obama

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