2020 Bathroom Remodel Cost | Average Renovation & Redo Estimator

Average Bathroom Remodel Cost

The average bathroom remodel costs $8,851, with most homeowners spending $5,578 to $15,138. A small bathroom remodel costs $2,500 to $15,000 and a master bath runs $10,000 to $30,000. Bathroom renovations cost $120 to $275 per square foot depending on the quality of materials, labor, and layout changes.

Average Bathroom Remodel Cost Chart

Bathroom Remodel Cost
National Average Cost $8,851
Minimum Cost $1,800
Maximum Cost $40,000
Average Range
$5,578
to
$15,138
  • Bathroom remodels increases your home’s resale value and have a 65% return on investment.
  • A complete bathroom remodel takes 15 to 25 days or about 3 to 4 weeks.
  • DIY remodels cost $1,500 to $10,000; however, hiring a pro would be only 20% of the total cost.

Consult with a bathroom remodeler to get free and accurate estimates near you, or check out our guide below for estimates, breakdowns, budgeting, and ideas.

Bathroom Remodel Cost Estimator

Bathroom remodeling cost estimates range from $3,000 to $30,000 with most contractors charging $5,000 to $15,000 depending on the room size. Other price factors include local labor rates, quality of materials and fixtures, changing or expanding the layout, adding fixtures, repairs, and hiring specialists.

Bathroom Remodel Cost Estimator Chart

Bathroom Remodel Cost Estimator
Type Average Cost
Small $2,500 – $10,000
Full $6,000 – $15,000
Master $10,000 – $30,000
  • Installation and labor typically makes up 20% or more.
  • Materials and fixtures regularly account for 60% and up.
  • Hiring a professional designer runs about 5% to 10%.
  • View our complete cost breakdown.
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Small Bathroom Remodel Cost

A small bathroom remodel costs $2,500 to $10,000, with most homeowners spending about $5,000 to renovate 40 square feet or less. Minor bathroom renovations with economical fixtures, basic upgrades, and some DIY work can cost $3,000 or less.

Small Bathroom Remodel - Upscale design with double sinks, wood cabinets

By: Titus Builders
Small Bathroom Remodel – Upscale design with double sinks, wood cabinets

Typical Full Bathroom Remodel Cost

A full bathroom remodel costs $6,000 to $15,000 for a complete tear-out where almost everything is replaced, but the layout doesn’t change. Midrange bathroom renovations include fixtures, showers, flooring, lighting, cabinets, wall tiling, painting, mirrors, and more.

White and Gray Master Bathroom Remodel with Luxury Fixtures and Custom Tile Shower.

By: Eco Design Pro Inc
White and Gray Full Bathroom Remodel with Luxury Fixtures and Custom Tile Shower.

Master Bathroom Remodel Cost

A master bathroom remodel costs $10,000 to $30,000 or $18,000 on average according to Remodeling Magazine. Luxury master bath remodels cost up to $50,000 and include high-end fixtures, upscale materials, freestanding bathtub, walk-in shower, a double vanity, flooring, lighting, and everything in between.

High-end master bathroom remodel with light-colored accents, and walk-in shower

Average Cost of Bathroom Remodel Per Square Foot

The average cost of a bathroom remodel is $120 to $275 per square foot depending on the quality of the materials and fixtures, and local labor costs. DIY bathroom remodeling costs as low as $70 to $100 per square foot, but does require some experience when you renovate it yourself.

Average Cost of Bathroom Remodel Per Square Foot Chart

Bathroom Remodel Cost Per Square Foot
Size Square Feet Average Cost
3×5 15 $1,800 – $4,100
4×6 16 $1,900 –
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How Much Does a Bathroom Remodel Cost? See 2020 Avg Prices

Before you hire a professional to remodel your bathroom, ask them these seven crucial questions first:

1. Can I see examples of your past bathroom remodeling work?

Read your contractor’s reviews. Comb for details on their punctuality, communication skills, work environment cleanliness and work quality. But if you see negative reviews, don’t dismiss the pro right away. Look at how they respond: if they show strong communication and conflict-resolution skills, they may still be a good fit.

Make sure you also ask for a portfolio of their past work, especially if you have a specialty project in mind. On Thumbtack, you can look at photos of previous work for bathroom remodeling contractors before you hire them.

2. Do you take on bathroom remodeling projects of my scope?

Some contractors specialize in certain kinds of projects. For example, one contractor may do bathroom additions and master bath renovations, while another focuses specifically on small bathroom remodels. Ask this question upfront to save everyone the time and effort of a site visit.

Also, if you need bathroom design services, make sure to ask if your contractor has design training. If not, consider hiring an architect or designer in addition to your bathroom remodeler.

3. How many projects do you run at the same time?

You want a company that has time for you and has long-term relationships with its subcontractors. Make sure you and your contractor have the same expectations about how often they will be onsite once the remodel or renovation kicks off. The contractor should be open with you about how long each stage of the project will take, and they should show a good understanding of what factors could potentially push that timeline out.

4. Who will be working in my home?

Many general contractors serve as the business head and hire foremen to run projects. Ask to meet the project manager and make sure it’s someone you want at your house every day. Depending on the elements of your bathroom remodeling project, your contractor will probably bring in more specialists.

This is a good thing in most cases — you want a specialist for things like drywall, painting, and retiling. But make sure you ask exactly what will be subcontracted out and get background information on those subcontractors.

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5. Are you bonded, licensed and insured?

Any contractor or subcontractor who works on your house should be bonded, licensed, and insured properly according to state and local standards. Insurance can help protect you if your home gets damaged during construction or workers are hurt on site, while hiring a bonded contractor can help protect you if the contractor fails to pay workers, doesn’t pay for permits, or doesn’t finish the work. Here’s more on how to do your research.

6. What permits does my renovation or remodel need and will you get them?

If a contractor isn’t willing to get the permits, it may be a sign they’re not licensed. You may need permits to make

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GOP senators ask CBO how much immigration provisions in House stimulus bill will cost

A group of Republican senators have asked the Congressional Budget Office to calculate how much measures in the House stimulus bill that directly benefit illegal immigrants would cost the American taxpayer.

“It is unfortunate that instead of working to help the American people, Speaker Pelosi and her majority in the House of Representatives are taking this opportunity to advance the economic well-being of illegal immigrants,” Sens. Thom Tillis, R-N.C.; Mike Lee, R-Utah; Joni Ernst, R-Iowa; and Kelly Loeffler, R-Ga., wrote in a letter to the CBO’s director.

HOUSE DEMOCRATS’ STIMULUS BILL INCLUDES STIMULUS CHECKS FOR ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS, PROTECTIONS FROM DEPORTATIONS

”Among other things, H.R. 6800 allows illegal immigrants to claim stimulus payments. In addition, Speaker Pelosi’s bill also provides illegal immigrants with taxpayer funded healthcare services,” they write.

The HEROES ACT, which passed the House last week, includes a number of items that will benefit illegal immigrants, with a provision that would allows some illegal immigrants — who are “engaged in essential critical infrastructure labor or services in the United States” —  to be placed into “a period of deferred action” and authorized to work if they meet certain conditions.

It also grants protections to those employers who hire those undocumented immigrants, ordering that “the hiring, employment or continued employment” of the defined group is not in violation of the Immigration and Nationality Act. That lasts until 90 days after the public health emergency is ended.

It’s language that was also included in the first House Democratic stimulus bill proposed back in May — a bill that was ultimately rejected in the Republican-controlled Senate.

Also in the legislation is language that would allow the a second round of stimulus checks, $1,200 per adults and $500 per dependant, to be extended to those without a social security number — including those in the country illegally who file taxes via an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN).

The senators’ letter also notes provisions that would give health care to illegal immigrants.

“We are concerned these changes will not only impose additional fiscal burdens on our nation’s budget but will also incentivize further unlawful immigration,” they wrote.

Among the questions they have for the CBO is how many illegal immigrants would be able to claim stimulus payments and how much it will cost, and how many illegal immigrants would benefit from the work authorization — and the estimated impact that would have on the job market.

“It’s time the American people have a fuller understanding of exactly how much Speaker Pelosi’s policies will cost them. While we have estimates of how much H.R. 6800 may cost in total, we believe Congress must know the costs of the specific provisions providing benefits to illegal immigrants,” they said.

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President Trump on Tuesday poured cold water on the chance of Republicans and Democrats coming to a deal on stimulus, saying that Pelosi was “not negotiating in good faith.”

“I have instructed my representatives to stop negotiating until after the

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Replacing the Cabinetry in This Kitchen Only Cost $500

You’ll be surprised—and inspired!—by some of the cost-cutting ideas that went into the renovation of this kitchen in a mid-1800s Victorian home located in Kingston, New York. Principal designer Maryline Damour of design and build firm Damour Drake undertook the project from concept to completion with the goal of transforming the space utilizing a careful mix of high/low budget materials. The result offers so many examples of how to use a renovation budget wisely.

AFTER: Maryline achieved her vision of a “rustic, glam, Victorian” kitchen by integrating a mix of high/low materials. Opting to refurbish used cabinets purchased for $500 and construct inexpensive countertops left room in the budget for splurging on the wood-paneled wall treatment, and the eye catching light fixture.

In terms of design, “the goal was an updated Victorian style kitchen,” Maryline explains. She wanted the kitchen to reflect modern aesthetics while referencing the architectural details of the era in which the home was built. In other words, Victorian but make it current.

After gutting the kitchen and reworking the floor plan to be more functional, Maryline sourced used cabinets from Big Reuse, rather than buying all new pieces. Another major save was the quartz countertops dupe constructed with $150 worth of materials from Home Depot. “Everyone thinks they’re Caesarstone,” Maryline says. Instead, they’re made from plywood painted bright white and coated in a thick layer of self-leveling epoxy resin poured on top.

BEFORE: “It was a mess,” Maryline says, of the crowded kitchen layout before, “practically everything had been crammed onto one wall of the kitchen.”

AFTER: The box-pleated sink skirt “is one of my favorite things,” Maryline says. “I was trying to reimagine what people would expect to see in a Victorian kitchen, so I used a very feminine floral fabric but then added box-pleats—instead of being flouncy, it looks very tailored.” The leather-wrapped cabinet door pulls add a hint of rustic warmth to the kitchen.

The warm gray and mauve color palette is a nod to the pink and purple paint colors typical in Victorian homes. I wanted to “dirty the palette up a bit, making it less sweet, and more sophisticated,” she says. Another traditional Victorian design detail, the kitchen sink apron, was embraced but reimagined, with tailored box pleats for a crisp look.

BEFORE: Replacing the 1960s cabinetry with a set of base cabinets sourced from Big Reuse for $500 enabled Maryline to devote more of her budget to high-end touches like the custom Shiplap wall treatment.

AFTER: The epoxy-coated countertops were made from $150 worth of hardware store materials (finished birch plywood with a routed edge, paint, and self-leveling epoxy). What’s more, they were surprisingly fool-proof to construct, and “they’ve held up really well to use, without any staining,” Maryline says.

AFTER: Incorporating accessories like a table lamp and mirrors in the kitchen decor make the space feel less utilitarian and more intimate. The cabinet and wall paint color is Sherwin-Williams Proper Gray and the

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Coronavirus Has Cost Garden City Millions

GARDEN CITY, NY — Garden City Mayor Theresa A. Trouvé recently outlined the financial toll the coronavirus and the associated shutdowns have taken on the village. The village was hit hard in a few key areas by delayed opens and residents not going out.

In a weekly address to village residents, Trouvé went into detail about the village’s first quarter finances, which were hurt by the coronavirus, as well as the effects on the end of the last fiscal year. The village’s fiscal year runs from June 1 to May 31.

In addition to the coronavirus, the village also faced expenses due to storms.

At the end of the 2019-20 fiscal year, the village saw a decrease in some areas due to the coronavirus, but also wound up saving money because of it. The village budgeted spending $67 million for the 2019-20 year, but only spent $60.6 million.

The village lost about $700,000 in fees because of the closure and cancellation of programs. That’s in addition to $104,000 in losses from the cancellation of the tennis program. The village also saw a loss of $483,000 in the Water Fund due a 3 percent decrease in usage.

There were lots of savings the village saw because of the coronavirus. It saved $2.3 million in salaries with unfilled positions, less overtime and fewer seasonal part-time workers hired. And while cancelling the programs cost the village money in fees, it also saved the village $800,000 in the associated expenses. The village also saw less expenses because the pool and tennis facility were closed.

For the start of the 2020-21 fiscal year, the village saw a big hit to one of its revenue streams. There was a $400,000 decrease in police and court fines, as well as in recreation. This was mainly due to fewer people going out, so police officers were writing fewer tickets.

Though the village saved some money by putting off the opening of the pool, it was a net loss. The village budgeted $1.3 million in revenue from the pool, but only received $354,000. Likewise, the tennis program is coming up $65,000 short of its projected revenues.

The coronavirus has also cost the village $350,000 since the pandemic began, mainly in cleaning supplies. The village is still working to get federal reimbursement for the costs.

Hurricane Isaias also impacted the village’s finances. Tree and debris removal, stump grinding, sidewalk repairs and more cleaning up from the storm cost the village about $1.4 million, plus another $104,000 in overtime for village workers.

Trouvé said the village applied to FEMA to have the expenses reimbursed, but it is not know when that money will come through.

This article originally appeared on the Garden City Patch

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Home Improvements That Add to Your Cost Basis

When you sell a property at a profit, you have to pay capital gains taxes on the sale. However, your capital gain isn’t the difference between the price you paid for the property and the price you sell it for. There are several other expenses that add to your cost basis.

Knowing what expenses can and cannot be added to your cost basis helps you accurately calculate your capital gain on a real estate sale. And it can save you significant money on your taxes over the long run. Here’s a quick guide to calculating your cost basis, what improvement expenses are included, what you can’t include, and why it matters so much.

What is your cost basis?

First, it’s important to know your cost basis when acquiring a property. This will be important in determining (and reducing) any capital gains tax you owe when you sell the property.

Your cost basis obviously includes the price you agree to pay for the property. It also includes certain settlement costs, such as:

  • title fees,
  • legal fees,
  • recording fees,
  • survey fees, and
  • any transfer or stamp taxes you pay in connection with the purchase.

However, your cost basis does not include hazard insurance premiums, moving expenses, or any mortgage-related charges. So mortgage insurance, credit report fees, and appraisal costs are out.

You want your adjusted cost basis to include as many of your property-related expenses as possible. A higher cost basis translates to lower tax liability later on.

For example, if you buy an investment property for $200,000 and sell it for $300,000, it may sound like you have a $100,000 capital gain. However, if you spend $5,000 on acquisition costs and $25,000 on renovations, your cost basis will be $230,000, which lowers your taxable gain to $70,000.

Home improvements that add to your cost basis

Besides purchase cost, the other big component of cost basis is the improvements you make to the property. These can be made immediately upon acquisition of the property or at a later date.

The IRS defines improvements as expenses that add to the value of the property, prolong its useful life, or adapt it to new uses. There’s obviously some gray area here. But examples will help clear it up a bit.

Basis-increasing improvements can include the following:

  • Additions: If you add an extra bedroom or bathroom, put a deck on the back of the home, add a garage, or construct a porch or patio, you’ve added value to the home.
  • Lawn and grounds improvements: Value-adding landscaping projects, driveway or walkway construction, building a fence or retaining wall, and adding a swimming pool can qualify as property improvements.
  • Exterior improvements: New windows, a new roof, and new siding are examples.
  • Insulation: This includes insulation in the attic, inside walls, under floors, or around pipes and ductwork.
  • Systems: Installing a new heating or air conditioning system, new ductwork, adding a central vacuuming system, wiring improvements, installing a security system, and putting in lawn irrigation are improvements.
  • Plumbing:
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‘Zero Cost House’ Review: Could Thoreau Save Us Now?

For an enduring figure in the American canon, Henry David Thoreau is needier than you might think. When this relic of the 1800s shows up in Toshiki Okada’s probing, funny, hugely resonant play “Zero Cost House,” he is insecure about his 21st-century status. It’s pretty clear he’s been keeping close tabs.

“Do you Google yourself, Mr. Thoreau?” the playwright asks — because this is the kind of show where the author is a character (well, two characters; more on that in a moment), communing with the past.

“Sure, every day,” Thoreau answers. So he knows that his readership is down.

Okada himself, as a young writer in Tokyo, was a fervent “Walden” devotee, and convinced that he always would be. By his late 30s, though, he has become an internationally lauded experimental playwright, but also a guy who considers Thoreau’s treatise on simple living naïve.

In “Zero Cost House” — written for the Philadelphia-based Pig Iron Theater Company, which first staged it in 2012 and has reconfigured it superbly for Zoom — those two versions of Okada (played by an assortment of actors) butt up against each other, albeit gently. Plush rabbit puppets and a charismatic architect-philosopher are along for the ride, with Björk on the soundtrack and cast members trading off characters almost relay-style.

To step into an Okada play is to enter a dreamscape, and that’s true of this fractured stage memoir, too. Then dream morphs into nightmare. The earthquake that struck Japan in March 2011, setting off a tsunami and a nuclear disaster at a power station in Fukushima, becomes the catalyst for Okada’s reconnection with “Walden” and a more radical way of life.

What gives this live-streamed “Zero Cost House” particular potency right now is the wide variety of lenses we have through which to view it — the assorted calamities jolting people into working for social change or into altering their comfortable lives in drastic, once unthinkable ways.

Yet this play is not a dour exercise. Translated into comfortably colloquial American English by the Okada veteran Aya Ogawa, it has a friendliness that makes it approachable.

Directed and adapted by Pig Iron’s co-artistic director Dan Rothenberg — whose previous Okada productions include the achingly atmospheric post-earthquake meditation “Time’s Journey Through a Room” and the more comically contemplative “The Sonic Life of a Giant Tortoise” — “Zero Cost House” encourages us to seize the opportunity of disaster: to be brave enough to live more meaningfully, to construct a better world.

By re-engaging this deeply with the text, making it work so beautifully online, the artists behind this production — including a uniformly excellent cast and a pair of designers, Maiko Matsushima (visual) and Rucyl Frison (sound) — are themselves responding to a crisis.

In the play, Thoreau mentions a moment in “Walden” when he meets a couple who “seemed to be in dire straits, and what was worse, they had no awareness of how their circumstances had gotten that way in the first place.”

Amid our

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How Much Does It Cost To Build A Dog House For My Dog?

You did your research, talked about it, consulted the kids, asked the neighbors and even the relatives. Then you went out and got your puppy, everybody is happy, but now what?

You have to decide where to keep your new pet, what sort of dog house to put them in and most of all, how much will it cost to build.

Of course a lot will depend on the type of dog, size and if it will be an inside or outside pet.

I know how you feel about this , because I have had many pets of my own, including goats and housing cost was always was a concern.

In computing building costs I have taken a few things into consideration :

… you already own a saw

… a drill is something you have

… there are some paint brushes on hand in your tool box

… you will use 3/4 inch plywood at $ 30 for a 4X8 sheet

… for support, use 1X2's at about $ 6 for an 8 foot piece

… screws will cost around $ 8

… paint, about $ 10 – $ 20

With these items and materials you can build your dog house, now for the total costs.

For a small dog

To make a house that measures about 22 "long X 15" wide X 20 "high with a roof, you will need

1 sheet of plywood $ 30

2 1X2's $ 12

screws, and paint $ 18

For a total cost of around $ 60.

This assumes that it will be used inside.

For a medium size dog

For pets up to about 40 pounds, their house size of 42 "long X 30" wide X 33 "high will require

1 1/2 sheets of plywood $ 45

3 1X2's $ 18

screws and paint $ 18

For a total cost of about $ 80

If you are going to use it outside and want to insulate the house, add about $ 30 more.

For large dogs

Beyond the 40 pounds, for large dogs and considering it will be an outside home. For a structure 70 "long X 46" wide X 60 "high you will need:

6 sheets of plywood $ 180

8 1X2's $ 48

screws $ 12

paint $ 25

4 sheets of insulation board $ 80

total cost of $ 345

Building a great home for your new pet is what every pet owner should strive to do. You want the best home but you also want to keep the cost at a reasonable level. It is always good to have an idea of ​​what type home you want to construct and what the final cost will be. By thinking things through, you will know how much it will cost to build a dog house for your new pet.

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Simple Tips For Low Cost Home Improvements

Have you been thinking about remodeling your home? Keep in mind that you can often achieve your goal without a giant expense. Small improvements introduced in almost every room, including the exterior of the house can make all the difference.

Here are a few tips to get you started:

Keep it clean and keep it simple!

A clean and neat house is appealing and eye-catching. You can start improving the appearance of your house simply by cleaning out the debris. Try making your garden look like an ideal place with some weeding and cleaning out the flower beds. Paint the front door to give your home a more welcoming feeling.

De-cluttering is also a part of cleaning, so get rid of things you don't need to make room for new ones. The first glance is usually enough for a selective buyer to quickly estimate a house.

Does the exterior of your home need repainting? Is there a walkway that you can highlight by introducing some flowers? Remember to keep it simple. Focus on making things neat and tidy.

Two hot spots of every home:

The two most closely inspected rooms of a house are the kitchen and the master bathroom. If you are looking to focus on two hot spots, these are the interior rooms where the most value can be added during a sale, so make them look their best to increase your return on investment.

Is your kitchen may be in need of an upgrade? A well updated kitchen will dramatically increase the value of your home, so focus on spicing up this room to grab buyer attention. Renovating your kitchen using modern décor is going to instantly improve the value of your home. Many times a buyer will compromise on other rooms and will buy a home just because its kitchen is well-maintained and inviting.

The same holds true for bathrooms, especially the master bathroom. You will charm open house-goers with modern upgrades like dual vanities and soaking tubs in your master bath. Replace the faucets and clean up the bathroom counter. We would again emphasize on simplicity because for easy maintenance.

What to Invest in?

So, you're done de-cluttering, cleaning and upgrading. What's next? Well, if you are willing to make a good upgrade investment, it is recommended to divide your renovation plan into four parts to bring impressive improvements to your home. Here are the four areas you may want to seriously consider upgrading:

Lighting: If you are not satisfied with the lighting system in your house, replace it.

This would entail buying lighting fixtures and other equipment for each room to make it look consistent and attractive.

Plumbing: Many old homes have rusty pipes and some leakage in the plumbing that needs attention. Your home will not sell fast and at a price you have in mind if you haven't already upgraded the plumbing system.

Flooring: Most people nowadays look for hardwood floors or alternatives that are easy to manage and provide health benefits …

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