Tim Scott signals White House about getting Trump to ‘correct’ debate exchange on white supremacists

Sen. Tim Scott said he told the White House that President Trump should “correct” his statement in response to a debate question about white supremacists.



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The lone black Republican currently in the Senate said on Wednesday that he believes the president “misspoke” during the first face-off against former Vice President Joe Biden that was moderated by Fox News’s Chris Wallace.

“I think he misspoke in response to Chris Wallace’s comment. He was asking Chris what he wanted to say, I think he misspoke. I think he should correct it, if he doesn’t correct it, I guess he didn’t misspeak,” the South Carolina senator told reporters, according to CNN.

“I’ve already sent my comments to the chief of staff,” Scott noted, referring to Mark Meadows.

During the debate, Wallace asked Trump if he would also denounce far-right militias and white supremacist groups who have participated in violence.

Trump initially responded that he was “willing to do that,” but he did not explicitly condemn any group.

“Do you want to call them — what do you want to call them? Give me a name,” Trump asked Wallace before addressing a specific right-wing group, the Proud Boys.

“Proud Boys? Stand back and stand by. But I’ll tell you what, somebody has got to do something about antifa and the Left because this is not a right-wing problem, this is a left-wing problem,” he said.

The Trump campaign has attempted to downplay the president’s remarks at the debate, with spokesman Hogan Gidley saying Trump has condemned white supremacists in the past.

Earlier on Wednesday another Republican in the upper chamber, Sen. Mitt Romney, told reporters that “of course” Trump should have condemned white supremacists when given the opportunity during the debate.

Tags: News, Tim Scott, White supremacists, Debates, Donald Trump, Senate, 2020 Elections, Congress

Original Author: Zachary Halaschak

Original Location: Tim Scott signals White House about getting Trump to ‘correct’ debate exchange on white supremacists

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Four Tips for Choosing the Correct LED Lights for Your Indoor Garden

Whether your outdoor space lacks the room you need to grow everything on your list, or you simply prefer to bring a bit of the outdoors in, one of the most important parts of maintaining an indoor garden comes down to lighting. Frank Petricoin, Gardyn’s lead grower, shares everything you need to know about picking the right light system for your interior growing space.



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An indoor garden expert shines a light on what it takes to help your plants thrive.


© Getty / RoBeDeRo
An indoor garden expert shines a light on what it takes to help your plants thrive.

Related: Secrets to Starting Seeds Indoors

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First, understand your plants’ needs.

Indoor gardening gives us the ultimate control over our plants, explains Petricoin, which means it becomes our responsibility to provide them with everything they need. That includes soil, hydration, and even lighting. “When considering any light for your indoor garden, the three most important things are spectrum, intensity, and efficiency,” he says. “Typically, full-spectrum lighting produces the best growth and is most identical to natural sunlight.”

Since indoor gardeners can manipulate light intensities, spectrums, and photoperiods to control the shape and stage of their plants, they need to first understand what their particular varieties need. “For example, light intensities can be increased for shorter, squatter plants or dialed back for new seedlings or to slow growth on mature plants,” he says. “Increasing photoperiods past 16 hours generally keep short-day plants in a vegetative state and encourages flowering in long-day plants.” If you shorten them to 12 hours you run the risk of reversing that effect, he adds, so choose your lights (and their settings) accordingly.

Use LED lights correctly.

When using LED lighting, it’s important to make sure the intensity and spacing is set up in such a way that no “hotspots” form, notes Petricoin. These put your plants at risk—in these zones, the light is too intense for them to handle. This is also why “efficiency is so important,” he says, “because lighting and cooling are the most energy-intensive aspects of indoor gardening, and inefficient lights turn electricity into heat instead of light.”

Invest wisely.

Petricoin says a lot of people have sticker shock when they first see the price of high-grade LED lights. “Indeed, it is the most expensive light most of us will ever purchase, so many try to cut corners by buying a cheaper model for a lower cost,” he says. “However, cheaper LED lights often do not produce spectrums, coverages, and intensities for plants to thrive happily.” Think of it this way: Since light sources are a part of your plants’ food, it’s important to be sure you’re feeding them the best “ingredients” possible.

Don’t sacrifice form for function.

Additionally, Petricoin points out that many indoor garden setups can be aesthetically displeasing. “People are typically forced to choose between dedicating an entire room to their garden, installing a big ugly grow tent in their living room, or dealing with intense light that can be annoying and burdensome,” he explains.

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