Beer lover brewed uncanny condo decor

As Amelotte’s personal representative, Johnson took on the task of selling the man cave after his friend died. And here we are.

Listing agent Jesse Kearney, of Kearney & Associates Realty, recalls Johnson’s phone call. “I have this condo of a friend who passed away,” the caller said. “He covered the walls in Budweiser cans.”

“How did he get Budweiser wallpaper?” Kearney wondered. Then he visited the property. “As soon as you open the door, you are overwhelmed. Seeing the pictures is nothing like walking in. That’s an entirely different experience.”

I can only imagine. “Did it smell funny?” I hold my breath as I ask, though I am hundreds of miles away.

“Actually, the place smelled of cigarettes, not stale beer.”

“Oh.”

“He was particular about the cans’ cleanliness,” Kearney said. “After he emptied a can, he would clean it, and let it dry before mounting.”

“And he mounted them, how?”

“He attached them to the walls and ceilings with caulk, and to each other with hot glue.”

“I see.”

“When you take a close look, you see how much time and effort this took. The attention to detail is amazing,” he said.

Indeed, Amelotte used different size cans to go around outlets and vents, created crown molding, and oriented each can so labels faced the same way.

Though unique properties like this can be a sales challenge, Kearney priced it to factor in possible renovations costs. Anheuser-Busch, Budweiser’s brewer, sweetened the deal with this offer: “You buy it, we’ll supply it. As long as you don’t renovate.” If the new owner maintains the decor, the beer maker will provide a year’s supply of Budweiser.

Kearney listed the place for $100,000, and got six offers. The property sold in three weeks, which just proves what my mother used to say about odd people who find love: “There’s a lid for every pot.”

Asked about the challenges and strategies for marketing unique properties, Kearney had this advice:

Play up, don’t hide, the uniqueness.

“Rather than play down a unique feature that would not appeal to most buyers, we lead with it,” Kearney said. “What most people see as a defect, like deciding to make the living room floor into an aquarium, we put in the forefront. By doing so, you put the uniqueness out there so going in buyers will know it’s there to either work around or embrace. The United States is full of eccentric people. You never know who is looking for a beer-themed condo.”

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Condo set among treetops beckoned garden-loving couple

“The Colonnade was built in the 1960s and has Old World construction, including solid plaster walls, wood floors and nine-foot-high ceilings,” says Molinaroli, a designer and museum exhibition consultant. “We wanted to play off the traditional classical elements of the apartment with a contemporary kitchen and modern bathrooms. Plus, as a museum designer, I’m interested in setting up spaces to display art and using lighting to direct people’s attention to different features.”

Molinaroli started the design process with two oak columns with their original finish that he has owned since 1978 when they were salvaged from a building in downtown D.C.

“The columns have been with me in every home, so here we used them to frame the living and dining area, which has a nice flow,” he says.

The renovation included replastering the walls to make them level, adding new wide-plank French oak floors, new custom moldings to complement the columns and new windows with electronic shades. A museum-quality lighting system was installed in the ceiling to showcase the couple’s art collection and the grand piano Carabetta, music director of St. John’s Episcopal Church in Georgetown, has recently used to record videos for virtual church services.

The terrace was repaved with bluestone, the kitchen includes European high-glass cabinets and upgraded appliances, and the bathrooms have been renovated with Porcelanosa tile and high-end fixtures such as a soaking tub by Waterworks.

The Colonnade condominium has been famous since it opened in 1966 as home to high-profile Washingtonians, including journalists Rita Braver and Diane Rehm, as well as the late senator Harry F. Byrd Jr. (D-Va.) and descendants of former presidents Roosevelt and Eisenhower.

“Retired Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor lived above us when we first moved into our condo in 2015,” says Carabetta. “The daughter of the former owner of our condo told us that her parents purchased it from senator Edmund Muskie’s daughter.”

While the interesting neighbors add to the charm of living in the Colonnade, the couple were mostly drawn to the building’s setting on the edge of Glover-Archbold Park and the building amenities.

“We loved our house and especially our garden, so our priority was to find a place with a gardenlike view and a terrace,” says Carabetta. “Now we live at tree level with the birds and every view is of a garden or park. The Colonnade has four major gardens that are well cared for, plus a heated swimming pool and terraces where you can grill and eat outside.”

This two-bedroom, three-bathroom condo has 1,600 square feet and is listed at $1.19 million. The monthly condo fee of $2,060 per month covers all utilities including gas, water, electricity, Internet access and cable TV.

2801 NEW MEXICO AVE. NW #408, WASHINGTON, D.C.

Features: Erected in the 1960s, the condo has solid plaster walls, wood floors and nine-foot-high ceilings. The living and dining area are framed by two oak columns that came from a downtown building. The renovation included replastering the walls to make them

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A beer lover went crazy with his condo decor

You might be amused. You might be aghast. But you will not be the same after reading about the King of Beers condo. I wasn’t.

When I first heard about this beer-lover’s condo for sale in Lake Worth, near Florida’s West Palm Beach, I had two thoughts in rapid succession: I can’t write about this. I have to write about this.

In a tribute to his best Bud, the owner had covered the walls and ceilings of his residence with Budweiser cans. The beholder of the beverage-inspired vision, Mike Amelotte, died in June at age 69 of cancer. His condo went up for sale six weeks ago.

I had to see the pictures. Then I had to get the scoop: Who was this guy? Was this a getaway or a full-time residence? What did it smell like? And why didn’t he just get kegs?

A U.S. Navy veteran, Amelotte later worked as a pool man and a waiter. He bought the two bedroom, 815-square-foot condo in 1986, and lived there full time. And his custom décor idea began to brew in 1990.

According to his close friend Kris Johnson, Amelotte had a towering stack of Budweiser cans on his dining table. Rather than squire them to the recycle bin, he told Johnson that he was going use them to cover the walls. (Notably, he did not have a wife to knock him to his senses.) He finished the project 16 years later. (At least he didn’t drink all that beer at once.)

“He placed every can himself,” Johnson said. “If you dented a can, he would give you hell, and replace it.”

As Amelotte’s personal representative, Johnson took on the task of selling the man cave after his friend died. And here we are.

Listing agent Jesse Kearney, of Kearney & Associates Realty, recalls Johnson’s phone call. “I have this condo of a friend who passed away,” the caller said. “He covered the walls in Budweiser cans.”

“How did he get Budweiser wallpaper?” Kearney wondered. Then he visited the property. “As soon as you open the door, you are overwhelmed. Seeing the pictures is nothing like walking in. That’s an entirely different experience.”

I can only imagine. “Did it smell funny?” I hold my breath as I ask, though I am hundreds of miles away.

“Actually, the place smelled of cigarettes, not stale beer,” Kearney said. “He was particular about the cans’ cleanliness. After he emptied a can, he would clean it and let it dry before mounting.”

“And he mounted them, how?”

“He attached them to the walls and ceilings with caulk, and to each other with hot glue. When you take a close look, you see how much time and effort this took. The attention to detail is amazing,” he said.

Indeed, Amelotte used different sized cans to go around outlets and vents, created crown molding and oriented each can so labels faced the same way.

Though unique properties like this can be a sales challenge, Kearney priced

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What Is a Condo? Condo vs. Apartment vs. House, Explained

What is a condo?

What is a condo? Short for “condominium,” a condo is a private residence within a larger building or complex.

The first condo in the United States was built in Salt Lake City in 1960, according to Matthew Gordon Lasner, author of “High Life: Condo Living in the Suburban Century.” Since then, this residence style has truly taken off. Currently, there are approximately 17 million privately owned condominiums in the U.S.

Condos might look like a lot of other types of real estate you may have heard of—like apartments, co-ops, or townhouses—but condos have their own distinct features, rules, pros, and cons. Here’s what condos are all about, and how they’re different from other structures in which you can live.

How condos work

Since a condo is part of a larger residential structure (although “detached condominiums” also exist), condo residents typically share certain common areas and amenities with their neighbors.

So what does this mean for a condo owner? It means you and your neighbors might park in a common parking lot or garage. You might use the same rec room or roof deck, or bump into one another at the condo complex’s swimming pool or gym.

Furthermore, these shared areas and amenities are enjoyed by all condo members without the need to maintain them on their own. Instead, condo owners pay dues to a board (typically made up of elected condominium owners) who then handle the hiring of landscapers, pool cleaners, and other professionals for anything that must be maintained or fixed, from faulty elevators to gopher infestations in common areas.

How much are condo fees, and what do they cover?

Average condo fees range from around $100 to $700 per month, although these fees can go much higher based on what amenities they cover. If the condo complex has high-end shared features such as a swimming pool, gym, and spa, condo fees can be several thousand per month.

what is a condo
Some condo complexes come with swimming pools.

typhoonski / Getty Images

Generally, condo fees pay for the maintenance of any amenities outside your personal living space that you share with your neighbors.

“Condo fees are your percentage share of the costs to run the building as a whole,” explains Janice Pynn, president of Simerra Property Management.

And in case you think your condo fees are too high, know this: No one pockets a cent of your checks or is getting rich off condo dues.

“They are not a profit source for building management; in fact, each building is registered as a nonprofit corporation,” Pynn points out. In other words, these fees go solely toward enhancing the value of your real estate, which is a good thing!

Here are the services and amenities you can expect your condo fees to cover:

  • Interior maintenance: Condo owners share the cost of maintaining common building areas like parking structures, storage rooms, laundry rooms, game rooms, fitness centers, saunas, and hallways, as well as mechanical systems like heating, cooling, electric,
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Heesen’s Newest 180-Foot Superyacht Has a Vast Interior Bigger Than a High-End Condo

Bloomberg

Perelman Selling Almost Everything as Pandemic Roils His Empire

(Bloomberg) — Bit by bit, billionaire Ronald O. Perelman is parting with his treasures.His Gulfstream 650 is on the market. So is his 257-foot yacht. Movers hauled crates of art from his Upper East Side townhouse after he struck a deal with Sotheby’s to sell hundreds of millions of dollars of works.He’s unloaded his stake in Humvee-maker AM General, sold a flavorings company that he’d owned for decades and hired banks to find buyers for stock he holds in other companies.What in the world is going on with Ron Perelman? His exploits on and off Wall Street have been tabloid fare in New York since the go-go 1980s. But now, at an age when most fellow billionaires are kicking back, Perelman, 77, is facing a range of financial challenges, most of all at Revlon Inc., his cosmetics giant.Once touted as America’s richest man, his wealth has dropped from $19 billion to $4.2 billion in the past two years, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index.Bankers, socialites and art collectors have been buzzing about Perelman since his investment company, MacAndrews & Forbes, said in July it would rework its holdings in response to the coronavirus pandemic and the ravages it caused to American businesses, including his own.“We quickly took significant steps to react to the unprecedented economic environment that we were facing,” Perelman said in a statement. “I have been very public about my intention to reduce leverage, streamline operations, sell some assets and convert those assets to cash in order to seek new investment opportunities and that is exactly what we are doing.”Read Ronald O. Perelman’s full statement herePerelman also gave more prosaic reasons for the shift, including spending time with his family during lockdown and a desire for a simpler life.“I realized that for far too long, I have been holding onto too many things that I don’t use or even want,” he said. “I concluded that it’s time for me to clean house, simplify and give others the chance to enjoy some of the beautiful things that I’ve acquired just as I have for decades.”Graydon Carter, the former editor of Vanity Fair who’s known Perelman for three decades, said the shift in Perelman’s attitude is sincere.“Often when people say this sort of thing, it’s masking something else. In Ronald’s case, it’s true,” said Carter, who partnered with Perelman to reopen the Monkey Bar in Midtown Manhattan. “He has learned to love and appreciate the bourgeois comforts of family and home.”Carter described Perelman as a “charismatic swashbuckler” who once enjoyed evenings on the New York social circle a little too much. But he said Perelman is now “crazy about spending time at home” with his fifth wife Anna, a psychiatrist, and their two young sons.Richard Hack, who wrote a 1996 unauthorized biography of Perelman, is skeptical.“If you want a simpler life, you go buy a farm in Oklahoma, not sell a painting out of your townhouse in Manhattan,” Hack said.

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Social media confounded by bizarre interior of Florida condo for sale: ‘Dear God’

A two-bedroom, two-bathroom condo in Lake Worth, Florida, is on sale for just $100,000 — but it requires a very, very specific buyer.

Why? Well, the walls of the “social media-worthy” condo are covered almost entirely in empty cans of Budweiser.

Whoever the current owner and seller of this condo is clearly has a thing for the American-style pale lager. Every single room, save for one ordinary bathroom, is decorated floor-to-ceiling with cans of Budweiser.

Though it’s impossible to ignore the beer cans everywhere, whoever the listing agent is for the condo did their best to make them sound appealing rather than alarmingly confusing.

“Entering the spacious 2BR/2BA corner-unit condo, you immediately reminisce of long road trips and the inevitable belting out of the beloved song, ’99 Bottles of Beer on the Wall!’” the listing says. “Budweiser’s biggest fan meticulously adorned the walls and ceilings with Budweiser beer cans to display and showcase their intense love for one of America’s favorite domestic brews! Whether you keep the current décor for your Youtube beer show or decide to renovate the home, this property offers tons of entertainment potential!”

Despite the agent’s best efforts, though, most people on social media still seem to find the boozy condo rather … odd.

“Just because you can doesn’t mean you should,” one person joked about the unusual decor.

“I was wondering why it was 100k and then I looked at the interior dear GOD,” another user added.

“I’d lock myself in the bathroom and never come out,” a third person remarked.

Some savvy social media users, however, see the $100,000 condo covered in empty cans as a worthy investment opportunity, especially seeing as the cans can be recycled for a pretty penny.

“Think of all the money you could get turning those cans in,” one person remarked. “The house pays for itself.”

“I’m not sure, but I think you could pay this house off by just recycling all the cans,” another user added.

So, who’s brave enough to take the plunge and buy the beer house?

Snag a 30-day free trial of Kindle Unlimited:

If you enjoyed this story, check out this “skinny” house with absurd proportions that went viral on TikTok.

More from In The Know:

This “run-down” house with no bathrooms is on sale for nearly $600,000

See inside this customized tiny home that’s complete with a patio and garden

Amazon’s best-selling seat cushion has done wonders for my bum while WFH

Subscribe to our daily newsletter to stay In The Know

The post This Florida condo is a beer lover’s dream appeared first on In The Know.

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Florida condo with bizarre wall decor confounds prospective buyers: ‘Dear God’

A two-bedroom, two-bathroom condo in Lake Worth, Florida, is on sale for just $100,000 — but it requires a very, very specific buyer.

Why? Well, the walls of the “social media-worthy” condo are covered almost entirely in empty cans of Budweiser.

Whoever the current owner and seller of this condo is clearly has a thing for the American-style pale lager. Every single room, save for one ordinary bathroom, is decorated floor-to-ceiling with cans of Budweiser.

Though it’s impossible to ignore the beer cans everywhere, whoever the listing agent is for the condo did their best to make them sound appealing rather than alarmingly confusing.

“Entering the spacious 2BR/2BA corner-unit condo, you immediately reminisce of long road trips and the inevitable belting out of the beloved song, ’99 Bottles of Beer on the Wall!’” the listing says. “Budweiser’s biggest fan meticulously adorned the walls and ceilings with Budweiser beer cans to display and showcase their intense love for one of America’s favorite domestic brews! Whether you keep the current décor for your Youtube beer show or decide to renovate the home, this property offers tons of entertainment potential!”

Despite the agent’s best efforts, though, most people on social media still seem to find the boozy condo rather … odd.

“Just because you can doesn’t mean you should,” one person joked about the unusual decor.

“I was wondering why it was 100k and then I looked at the interior dear GOD,” another user added.

“I’d lock myself in the bathroom and never come out,” a third person remarked.

Some savvy social media users, however, see the $100,000 condo covered in empty cans as a worthy investment opportunity, especially seeing as the cans can be recycled for a pretty penny.

“Think of all the money you could get turning those cans in,” one person remarked. “The house pays for itself.”

“I’m not sure, but I think you could pay this house off by just recycling all the cans,” another user added.

So, who’s brave enough to take the plunge and buy the beer house?

Snag a 30-day free trial of Kindle Unlimited:

If you enjoyed this story, check out this “skinny” house with absurd proportions that went viral on TikTok.

More from In The Know:

This “run-down” house with no bathrooms is on sale for nearly $600,000

See inside this customized tiny home that’s complete with a patio and garden

Amazon’s best-selling seat cushion has done wonders for my bum while WFH

Subscribe to our daily newsletter to stay In The Know

The post This Florida condo is a beer lover’s dream appeared first on In The Know.

Source Article

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