Architect converts auto rickshaw into mobile home complete with bed, kitchen and toilet – it s viral

Home / It’s Viral / Architect converts auto rickshaw into mobile home complete with bed, kitchen and toilet

The custom vehicle has been designed by architect Arun Prabhu NG.

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Updated: Oct 12, 2020, 21:21 IST

The architect Arun Prabhu NG named the project SOLO 01.
The architect Arun Prabhu NG named the project SOLO 01. (Instagram/@the.billboards.collective/)

Thanks to social media, you may have seen several pictures or videos of auto rickshaws with various modifications. However, this one takes customisation to a whole new level. An architect has impressed netizens by creating a tiny home on top of an auto rickshaw. The special vehicle has a bed, kitchen and bathroom along with other amenities. Pictures of the creation have gone viral.

The custom vehicle has been designed by architect Arun Prabhu NG. He shared pictures of the portable auto rickshaw back in December 2019.

“Super stoked to finally reveal a project that has been in the works! SOLO 01,” said a post detailing the special vehicle. “This ingenious small space design transforms a customized THREE WHEELER into a comfy mobile home,” it said further.

The pictures shared, show that the vehicle is equipped with a kitchen, wash basin, bathroom set-up with a bathtub, and a bed. The structure has solar panels and a water tank. The space also has several shelves and racks, and many windows for ventilation.

The vehicle once again caught people’s attention thanks to a Twitter thread about it.

Twitter user [email protected] posted three tweets sharing details about the vehicle and also shared some pictures.

Several people have shared reactions about the special portable home. Many also tagged business tycoon Anand Mahindra in their tweets.

 What do you think about this special three-wheeler home?

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Trump Maps Return to Campaign Trail After White House Says COVID-19 Treatment Complete | Top News

By Jeff Mason and Steve Holland

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Republican President Donald Trump on Friday prepared to return to the campaign trail with a pair of weekend rallies after his COVID-19 diagnosis sidelined him for a week in the race against Democratic nominee Joe Biden for the White House.

Trump, who announced he had been infected with the coronavirus on Oct. 2 and spent three nights in a military hospital receiving treatment, said late on Thursday he was feeling “really good” and, with a doctor’s blessing, aimed to campaign in Florida on Saturday and in Pennsylvania on Sunday.

Trump’s illness has kept him from crisscrossing the country to rally support and raise cash in the final weeks before the Nov. 3 election. A return to in-person events would be aimed at convincing voters he is healthy enough to campaign and to govern.

While Trump has released several videos on Twitter, he has not appeared in public since he returned home from the hospital on Monday. Biden has continued to campaign, with events scheduled on Friday in Las Vegas, Nevada.

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines say people who are severely ill with COVID-19 might need to stay home for up to 20 days after symptoms first appear.

Biden, who has sharply criticized Trump’s handling of the pandemic, is beating the Republican in national polls, though that lead is narrower in some of the swing states that may determine the election’s outcome.

White House physician Sean Conley said in a memo released on Thursday that Trump had completed his course of therapy for COVID-19, remained stable since returning home from the hospital and could resume public engagements on Saturday.

Sounding hoarse and occasionally pausing and clearing his throat, Trump told Fox News host Sean Hannity in an interview late on Thursday that he was likely to be tested for the virus on Friday. The White House has declined to say when Trump last tested negative.

“I feel so good,” Trump said.

The president is expected to host a “virtual rally” on Friday by appearing on conservative radio host Rush Limbaugh’s radio program.

The Trump and Biden campaigns sparred on Thursday over a televised debate that had been planned for next week. Trump pulled out after the nonpartisan commission in charge said the Oct. 15 event would be held virtually with the candidates in separate locations because of health and safety concerns after Trump contracted COVID-19. Biden’s campaign arranged a town hall-style event in Philadelphia instead.

Trump’s White House and campaign have experienced an outbreak of the virus in the last week, with multiple top aides, including the president’s press secretary and campaign manager, testing positive.

Trump and his staff have largely eschewed wearing masks, against the guidance of health professionals, and held rallies with thousands of people in indoor and outdoor venues despite recommendations against having events with large crowds.

Trump’s health will remain in the spotlight even if he begins holding events again.

(Reporting by Jeff Mason and

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This Pop-Up ‘Nightmare Before Christmas’ Bouquet Will Complete Your Halloween Decor

Photo credit: Lovepop
Photo credit: Lovepop

From Best Products

Disney’s The Nightmare Before Christmas by Tim Burton is one of the most iconic Halloween movies for all ages (even if it has “Christmas” in the title). So it’s only natural that we’d want to incorporate it into our Halloween decor, and we have our eyes on the Lovepop’s Seriously Spooky Bouquet.

The 10.25-inch-tall paper bouquet incorporates flowers and pieces from the movie. It’s made up of red, black, and white “roses,” Jack Skellington heads and hands, and green stems and leaves. The creation comes in a black-and-white-striped pop-up vase, so it can sit on your table or countertop.

“Everybody scream! Send these creepy-cute blossoms to that one friend who wishes every day was Halloween,” the description says. “Give your other half this Seriously Spooky Bouquet as a gesture of your undying love. Any diehard fans of The Nightmare Before Christmas will adore this scary sentiment.”

You can order the Lovepop Seriously Spooky Bouquet online for $26. It’s delivered in a protective paper envelope, and then you unfold the flowers to bring the cool 3D piece to life. Who knew paper could create such an incredible work of art?

Last year, we weren’t the only ones who were in awe of Roseshire’s The Nightmare Before Christmas Rose Bouquet, which is made of real red or white flowers. Now you don’t have to worry about how long your bouquet will last, because you can break out Lovepop’s year after year.

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Honestly, No Kitchen Is Complete Without a Mandolin Slicer



a knife sitting on top of a table


© Williams Sonoma


Want to know the secret prep tool that will help you churn out restaurant-quality dishes in the comfort of your home kitchen?It’s a mandolin, my friends. Not only will it help you create more impressive meals, but it might also shave (pun intended) down some of your ingredient prep time. Whether you’re down about your knife skills or just looking for a tool that will switch up how you prepare your ingredients, this snazzy (and underrated, if I do say so myself) device is exactly what you need in your life.

Mandolins have a reputation for being a tool that is only used by professional chefs. I get it, I get it. That sharp blade is no joke and can definitely be intimidating, especially for somebody who may not feel completely confident with their own knife skills. If you are concerned about losing a limb, I’ll offer you the same advice that Hilary Duff offered me in the 2004 classic, “A Cinderella Story.” Don’t let the fear of striking out keep you from playing the game! Wear the protective glove (so you don’t have to worry about any potential crime scene scenarios on your cutting board) and go slowly to start. You’ll get the hang of it in no time, and you will end up with just as many limbs as you started with.

The most common use for a mandolin is thinly, and consistently, slicing produce. Ever wonder how to get a potato gratin with completely uniform cuts on all the ‘taters? Or how to create a beautiful raw salad or slaw with dainty, thin slices of fennel, radishes, celery, and apples? You’re going to spend a lot of time and elbow grease trying to achieve those thin slices with your chef’s knife. Plus, if your knife blade isn’t its sharpest, then you might as well not even bother. In other words, get a mandolin—you’re worth it.

WATCH: How to Make Sheet Pan Scalloped Potatoes with Ham and Peas

How to Make Sheet Pan Scalloped Potatoes with Ham and Peas

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What you may not realize about a mandolin is that it’s also great for so many other types of cuts besides thin slices. The day that we broke out the crinkle-cut blade in culinary school and made waffle fries was one of the best of my life. Mandolins also have a julienne blade that’s great for creating thin and uniform matchsticks out of carrots, cucumbers, beets, zucchini, and so much more. I am a huge believer in short cuts (how do you think I ran under a 10-minute mile as a plump 5th grader?), and whipping out the mandolin to help me with ingredient prep is one of my favorite time savers.

Okay, now that my convincing sales tactics have persuaded you that you need a mandolin slicer ASAP, you’re probably wondering which one to buy. Not all mandolins are created equal, so this is a valid inquiry.

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White House, Congress struggle to complete stop-gap spending bill as October shutdown looms

Trump weighed in on the issue over Twitter, writing: “Pelosi wants to take 30 Billion Dollars away from our great Farmers. Can’t let that happen!”

Trump has already spent several years directing tens of billions of dollars in bailout funds to farmers by using a Depression-era law in a way that even some Agriculture Department officials believed was possibly improper. To continue sending the funds, Trump needs congressional approval, and Democrats have opposed sending more bailout money to farmers because they allege he is using the taxpayer money to try and mollify the political backlash to his trade policies.

Trump announced at a rally Thursday night in the battleground state of Wisconsin that farmers would get an additional $13 billion, money from the same fund that the administration is seeking to replenish via the short-term spending bill.

“We have serious concerns about giving President Trump a blank check to spread political favors,” a senior House Democratic aide involved in the talks said in explaining the Democrats’ opposition to the money. “It is an abuse of taxpayer dollars to give this administration more money so the president can grab headlines with announcements at campaign rallies.” The aide spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss internal deliberations.

Additionally, Democrats are seeking more money for food assistance to children impacted by the coronavirus pandemic. They also want $3.6 billion in additional election security funds as part of the short-term bill — something Republicans oppose.

The talks on the short-term spending bill are separate from the stalemate over a new coronavirus relief bill. That standoff showed no signs of budging on Friday, as Pelosi continued to hold out for a $2.2 trillion bill that Republicans have rejected — despite pressure from moderates in her caucus to give ground.

Pelosi dismissed a reporter’s question about whether she was letting the perfect be the enemy of the good regarding the broader coronavirus relief bill. She reiterated that she has already compromised from a $3.4 trillion bill House Democrats passed in May, which the White House and Senate Republicans dismissed.

“It’s not perfect … perfect is $3.4 trillion,” Pelosi said. “This is not about perfect being the enemy of the good.”

Trump has recently signaled he would be comfortable with a bill in the area of $1.5 trillion. Both Trump and House Democrats have said they support legislation that would send another round of stimulus checks to Americans, as well as more unemployment assistance.

The plight of airlines is also a growing area of concern for members of both parties. A provision from the Cares Act that required airlines to keep workers on payroll in exchange for aid expires Sept. 30, and major airlines have warned of mass lay-offs.

In a letter Friday to congressional leaders and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, the head of United Airlines and the leaders of several major airline unions urged Congress to renew negotiations on a new covid relief bill that would include an extension of the airline Payroll Support Program. The

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See inside this customized tiny home that’s complete with a patio and garden

Our team is dedicated to finding and telling you more about the products and deals we love. If you love them too and decide to purchase through the links below, we may receive a commission. Pricing and availability are subject to change. 

In Dream Big, Live Small, we visit tiny home-dwellers, discovering why they choose to live this way, how they manage it and the possibilities to do things like travel, learn and grow that have resulted from downsizing so significantly. In the long run, living small is really about living big.

For some, deciding to live tiny means making big life changes, including downsizing material possessions and adjusting to a small living space. But for Jodie and Bill Brady, going tiny was easy because they were able to build their dream home.

In this episode of Dream Big, Live Small, the Bradys share why they traded their average-sized home for a 250-square-foot tiny house in the Blue Ridge Mountains in Virginia.

“Our house is truly one-of-a-kind because we designed and built it ourselves,” Jodi said. “And our design aesthetic was [all about] analyzing the way that we lived and the spaces that we actually used. Our house fits us like a glove.”

Inside the Brady’s home, you’ll find an alcohol-burning stove, a large sink, multi-purpose furniture, a composting toilet, solar panels to power the home and more. But one of couple’s favorite areas is what they call “the screen house,” a separate structure they built first.

“One of the reasons we wanted to move out here and change the way we were living was we wanted to learn to grow a little of our food,” Jodie said. “We have two vegetable gardens here. Then, outside our vegetable garden, we have a pollinator garden, which attracts bees and butterflies that do all the work of growing food.”

To get a complete tour the Brady’s tiny home, be sure to watch the full episode above. And in case you want to join the tiny house revolution, check out these kits you can buy on Amazon to build your own.

Tiny homes to shop on Amazon

Shop: Allwood Claudia 209 SQF Cabin Kit, $9,650

Shop: Allwood Arland 227 SQF Studio Cabin Garden House Kit, $9,990

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Four Essential Tasks to Complete in the Garden This Fall

As summer’s swelter gives way to the crisp, cooler temperatures of fall, your garden begins to change—and so should your task list, since your yard’s needs adjust as the seasons do. While some of your plants may be at the dawn of their growing cycles when autumn hits, others are at the end; these generally need to be cut back to begin their dormant period. Here, two garden experts explain all of key tasks to accomplish in your garden this fall, regardless of what you have growing there.



a tree in a forest: Getty / Johner Images


© Provided by Martha Stewart Living
Getty / Johner Images



a tree in a forest: Consider this your guide to getting your yard ready for this season and beyond.


© Getty / Johner Images
Consider this your guide to getting your yard ready for this season and beyond.

Related: The Best Vegetables to Plant This Fall

Prepare for Fall Planting

Cooler weather doesn’t have to be your garden’s curtain call. In some areas (and for some varieties or plants), the blooming has just begun. As a matter of fact, some plants prefer the cooler nights and shorter days that fall brings, so you’ll need to plan accordingly. This is especially true if you want to get your favorite fall annuals, like mums, in the ground; make sure your garden beds are clear of summer’s leftover debris before you plant. And if you’re expecting autumn flowers and foliage, add another another layer of compost, till the earth, and start any seeds that need time to establish well before the first frost.

Fall can also be a great time to plant hardy trees; doing so during this time allows them the chance to form root systems before the next growing season. Plant them now so that they will be ready for spring, says Chad Husby, Ph.D. and Chief Explorer at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden. “It is also a good time to plant many hardy bulbs and perennials so that they can have a stronger start the growing season,” he shares.

Protect Less Hardy Plants

If you have plants that are marginally hardy in your area, Husby suggests taking the time this season to protect the more delicate ones. This will give them a better chance of coming back in the springtime, when the weather turns warm again. Herbaceous plants, in particular, need your attention, says Husby: “Layers of mulch or compost can help insulate them,” he adds.

Prune

Plants that put on their biggest show during these cooler weeks need to be pruned before new buds begin to form. And you’ll need to act fast. “All-winter blooming shrubs and trees should have been pruned by the fall equinox—September 22—so not to interrupt the blooming cycle,” explains Joel Crippen, the Display Garden Horticulturist with Mounts Botanical Garden of Palm Beach County. And for the varieties that are done for now? Cut them all the way back, so they’re ready to go when they reawaken.

Collect Seeds

Saving seeds from your spring and summer flowers? Make sure you’ve collected them before frost or birds get there first. Just make sure you’re storing them safely, so

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