10 Commandments For Kitchen Safety

"Nonna, can I please wash the dishes?" pleaded Ally, my eight-year-old granddaughter. Ally is like most kids, she loves to help in the kitchen. Although she's eager to wash dishes, I'll guarantee, that in four or five years the sight of dirty dishes won't be so exciting. Today, helping to wash dishes is fun, as she's learning how things work. She's learning to appreciate whole foods and what makes a nutritious meal by helping in the kitchen.

Involving kids with meal preparation gives them an opportunity to have multi-sensory experiences with various foods. This is especially valuable when introducing new food items or when changing the family's diet from processed foods to whole foods. In fact, multi-sensory learning is foundational when transforming a picky eater to a healthy eater.

So how do you avoid common kitchen hazards, especially for children? As valuable as tactile experiences are for appreciation of nutritious foods, when children are helping you in the kitchen, it takes only one unguarded moment for an accident to occur. Injuries and potential food poisoning are less likely if you adhere to the following sage advice.

1. Always wash hands with soap and water before handling food.
This applies to everyone working in the kitchen. Germs can spread easily if hands aren't properly cleaned. Wash hands with soap and water for at least twenty seconds. Rubbing the hands together under water is as important as the soap is for cleanliness. With kids, make a game of it. Sing the alphabet song while washing hands. Make it educational by counting off the twenty seconds with your child while washing her hands. When your youngster can count to twenty by herself; count backwards from twenty to one.

2. Use a sturdy step stool for your child to comfortably reach the counter.
Children love to help and their involvement in the kitchen is vital for food appreciation. Purchase a sturdy step stool to prevent falls and injuries.

3. Never allow children to eat uncooked eggs.
Kids love to lick the batter off the spoon when making cookies. But salmonella from uncooked eggs is a real concern. Explain that it's better to taste the cookie after it's baked, so you won't get sick.

4. Caution kids about the hazard of a hot stove and oven.
Always be alert when a small child is around hot surfaces. So many accidents are preventable. Burns from scalding water and hot ovens are two of them. Keep cords to cooking appliances out of harms way. Always keep a fire extinguisher in your kitchen. To extinguish small fires, throw baking soda over flames. If grease in a pan begins to flame, cover the pan to cut off the oxygen supply. Turn off the heat.

5. Point pot and pan handles toward the back or center of the stove.
This is such an easy habit to start. This simple step prevents lively children (and adults) from coming in contact with a handle sticking out from the stove and spilling its …

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