Manifold Garden coming to Xbox Series on November 10

Manifold Garden

William Chyr Studio will release an Xbox Series version of Manifold Garden alongside the launch of Xbox Series platforms on November 10, the developer announced. The game will run at native 4K resolution and 60 frames per second on Xbox Series X, and 1440p resolution at 60 frames per second on Xbox Series S.

Users who own the Xbox One version of Manifold Garden will receive the Xbox Series version as a free upgrade via Smart Delivery.

According to William Chyr Studio, the next-generation upgrade will be a “timed exclusive” for Xbox Series. In a ResetEra post, Manifold Garden producer Syrenne McNulty explained, “We can’t talk about the business realities such as why we’re on Xbox first versus PlayStation, who authored what language, etc. I can however be clear—no deal was signed, nor money changed hands, regarding a next-gen upgrade policy. We were working on the Series X | S version, and it was ready for launch (in fact, it’s already live for anyone with the hardware as of today.) No conspiracy theories here.”

As for a PlayStation 5 upgrade patch, McNulty said to “stay tuned for future news.” She later added, “The fact that our PlayStation answer is ‘stay tuned’ comes from us, not any of our business partners. We don’t want to talk about things until we have details and an announcement ready.”

Manifold Garden is available now for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch, PC via the Epic Games Store, and Apple Arcade. The PC version will come to Steam on October 20.

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Drive-In movies coming to Cultura Beer Garden just in time for Halloween

Laredo film lovers have not had much to celebrate recently, with closures announced at two major Laredo theaters — the Alamo Drafthouse and Regal Cinema — and the delay of a number of big-budget movies. However, local nonprofit Laredo Film Society is doing all it can to keep the love of cinema alive in Laredo.

In partnership with Cultura Beer Garden, the organization is hosting a series of drive-in movies designed to give locals a safe, movie-going experience amid restrictions in place to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus.

In celebration of the Halloween season, the movies selected for the series are all designed to get Laredoans in a spooky mood.


On Saturday, October 17, a screening of 1985 Italian horror film “Phenomena”. Directed by horror master Dario Argento and starring a young Jennifer Connelly in the lead role, the film tells the tale of a teen girl who attempts to chase a serial killer after she discovers her psychic powers.

On Halloween night, the group will screen cult classic “The Rocky Horror Picture Show”.  The 1975 musical comedy horror film stars Tim Curry, Susan Sarandon, and Barry Bostwick and is a musical tribute to the campy horror and science fiction B movies that populated theaters from the 30s to the 60s. The film’s plot centers around a young couple whose car breaks down, leading them to the wild world of Dr. Frank-n-Furter and company.

In addition to the film screening, Cultura’s food trucks will be in full operation, with many of the trucks offering special movie snacks for the locals in attendance. Note though, that outside food and drinks will be prohibited.

Tickets start at $10 for al fresco seating and are available to purchase at laredofilm.org/tickets. Tickets for the Halloween night screening will go on sale at a later date.

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Guy Fieri’s American Kitchen + Bar is coming to the new Live! Casino Pittsburgh

Star of multiple shows on Food Network, award-winning chef and restauranteur Guy Fieri announced Tuesday that he’s bringing a new restaurant to the new Live! Casino Pittsburgh. 



a sandwich sitting on top of a wooden table: The iconic Bacon Mac 'n' Cheese Burger is shown here at Guy Fieri's Philly Kitchen and Bar at Harrah's Casino and Racetrack. The burger is made with an all-beef patty, smoked bacon, six-cheese mac 'n' cheese, lettuce, tomato, onion, pickle and Donkey Sauce. It will be included on the menu of his new restaurant in Pittsburgh.


© Julia Hatmaker | [email protected]/pennlive.com/TNS
The iconic Bacon Mac ‘n’ Cheese Burger is shown here at Guy Fieri’s Philly Kitchen and Bar at Harrah’s Casino and Racetrack. The burger is made with an all-beef patty, smoked bacon, six-cheese mac ‘n’ cheese, lettuce, tomato, onion, pickle and Donkey Sauce. It will be included on the menu of his new restaurant in Pittsburgh.

Guy Fieri’s American Kitchen + Bar will open at the Live! Casino Pittsburgh, located in Westmoreland County, later this year. Fieri’s restaurant will join Sports & Social Steel City as some of the dining options available at the new casino, according to WPXI News.

Related: Live! Casino Pittsburgh is expected to open by the end of the year

“Pennsylvanians know great food and I’ve seen it all around the state shooting DDD and with my own restaurants so, I couldn’t be more stoked to bring my American Kitchen + Bar to Live! Casino Pittsburgh,” said Guy Fieri in a press release. “Get on board Pittsburgh, we’re heading to Flavortown!”

The new restaurant will feature a creative menu including Fieri’s world-famous Trash Can Nachos, Jalapeno Pig Poppers and his popular Bacon Mac-n-Cheese Burger. There will also be signature drinks and desserts.

Since 1996, he has co-owned or licensed his name to restaurants around the country and on cruise ships, some of which are now closed. After winning the second season of “The Next Food Network Star” in 2006, he went on to successfully host multiple cooking shows on Food Network, including “Guy’s Big Bite,” “Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives” and “Guy’s Grocery Games.”

Read more:

Guy Fieri’s Philly Kitchen changes its menu up, and the Mayor of Flavortown himself approves

Central Pa. restaurants opening, somehow, during coronavirus pandemic: ‘I’m definitely nervous’

Nalan Indian Cuisine in Lemoyne borrows from owner’s Philadelphia restaurant

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Autumn’s dark days are coming, but the garden prevails

There is a moment when it hits you, like the end of an affair. There were signs you missed, maybe chose to ignore. The response to your touch less immediate. The magic diminished. Face it. It is over. Approaching winter’s already won; summer’s sun has fallen. The brightest days of autumn cannot beat the retreat.

I am ever-alert for this moment. The first day you see the seedlings struggle. When new growth is a shadow of just weeks before. Stunted now, slowed.

I cannot pretend I love the arrival of the autumn equinox. I try. It is fine if I am walking in woods or by the sea, scuffing leaves, roasting pumpkins, gathering nuts, foraging for wild mushrooms, scouring for ever-smaller opportunities.

Many of my neighbours will cover their plots in the next weeks. Put it to sleep. But I was never one for abandoning. I am not over-keen on cloches or mini polytunnels (though I am again futilely researching them as I write).

Last year, we netted off a section of the plot to protect the winter kales and chards from the watching and waiting pigeons. For now, they will avoid the bitter chicories, preferring the sweeter leaves. I uselessly, hopelessly, scour seed and garden sites for solutions. Last autumn I bought ‘super plugs’ of Tuscan kale to grow, protected by the netting. They were a disappointment compared to plants I’ve grown from seed.

I need to pull myself together. It will be over soon, my mood. The melancholic adjustment will click into place. There will be more discrete moments of magic. The owl will call early in the afternoon, the fox may trot close by now it is quieter, a sole calendula may flash orange. All will brighten the gloom. There will be mists. I will mellow.

Allan Jenkins’s Plot 29 (4th Estate, £9.99) is out now. Order it for £8.49 from guardianbookshop.com

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‘A place to get away’: Huge water feature coming to Tulsa Botanic Garden | News

The water garden’s name comes from John and Mary Ann Bumgarner of the Bumgarner Family Charitable Foundation, which made the “major gift” to make the project possible.

At Wednesday’s announcement, John Bumgarner said he is excited to see the garden develop further and thrilled to forever be a part of it.

“This garden’s special to Tulsa,” Bumgarner said. “It’s growing, as most gardens do, and it’s expanding and it’s future is going to be very bright.

“It’s a good effort, a good project, and we’re most happy to support it.”

A spokeswoman for the Botanic Garden said that while the Bumgarners declined to announce the exact amount of their donation, the entire project cost is about $1.25 million.

To make the water garden, crews will raise the pool at the seven-acre lake’s north end 18 inches to create a waterfall at the southern end. Opposite this feature at the Sunrise Bridge, water will flow into the garden over natural rock with a view to the floating gardens on both sides of the pool.

Those floating gardens will include water-loving plants like iris and hibiscus while the lilies take up the standing water in between on the southern end. The walking path will take visitors past the overlooks on the pool’s eastern side, with each platform offering a closer view at the lilies and floating gardens below beneath the cypress trees’ shade.

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‘A place to get away’: Huge water feature coming to Tulsa Botanic Garden | Local News

The water garden’s name comes from John and Mary Ann Bumgarner of the Bumgarner Family Charitable Foundation, which made the “major gift” to make the project possible.

At Wednesday’s announcement, John Bumgarner said he is excited to see the garden develop further and thrilled to forever be a part of it.

“This garden’s special to Tulsa,” Bumgarner said. “It’s growing, as most gardens do, and it’s expanding and it’s future is going to be very bright.

“It’s a good effort, a good project, and we’re most happy to support it.”

A spokeswoman for the Botanic Garden said that while the Bumgarners declined to announce the exact amount of their donation, the entire project cost is about $1.25 million.

To make the water garden, crews will raise the pool at the seven-acre lake’s north end 18 inches to create a waterfall at the southern end. Opposite this feature at the Sunrise Bridge, water will flow into the garden over natural rock with a view to the floating gardens on both sides of the pool.

Those floating gardens will include water-loving plants like iris and hibiscus while the lilies take up the standing water in between on the southern end. The walking path will take visitors past the overlooks on the pool’s eastern side, with each platform offering a closer view at the lilies and floating gardens below beneath the cypress trees’ shade.

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Marionette show coming to Lizabuth Ann’s Kitchen

GREENFIELD — There’s something magical about puppets — especially the ones on strings, called marionettes. You pull one string and the creature, say, a clown, raises its hand to wave. Pull another string, and you can get him to nod or shake his head. If you work awhile at pulling two strings, you can make the clown look like he’s walking across the stage or down the street. Puppets make people smile.

And Peggy Melchior Pearson is hoping for a lot of smiles when she brings Melchior’s Marionettes to Lizabuth Ann’s Kitchen behind the Riley Boyhood Home at 1 p.m. Sept. 26.

Describing her performances as ‘marionette puppet shows,’ Pearson will bring a select group from her collection of more than 200 puppets. She will then present a variety show that includes puppets who sing, dance and entertain — with her help, of course.

Pearson’s appearance at the Riley Home will include not only the performance, but a PowerPoint presentation on the history of puppetry, an international display of marionettes and a children’s puppetry workshop.

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Pearson is committed to sharing the history of puppetry.

“A lot of people think that puppetry is a little amusement for children,” Pearson said. “It has a long history from before people could read.”

Puppetry dates back to at least the 1600s, Pearson said. When most people couldn’t read, it was a vehicle for not only storytelling, but education, religious messages and sharing news events. Puppets were used for illustration.

Punch and Judy, two classic puppetry characters were a huge hit during the Renaissance (1300 — 1600 A.D.). Pearson described Punch and Judy puppet shows as soap operas, where the ‘common man’ Punch was a hero.

“He had no job, he drank too much, his wife verbally abused him,” Pearson said. “He was politically incorrect but audiences loved him.”

Punch and Judy may not be a part of Melchior’s show, but after 40 years of performances, there are definitely some audience favorites in her cast of stringed characters.

Among those is an alien in a flying saucer who lands on earth and dances to an instrumental piece called “Axel F” from the 1984 film “Beverly Hills Cop.” Another in a worm who comes out of an apple, a bit handed down from Pearson’s mother, who was also a puppeteer.

Melchior is a first-generation American and a second-generation puppeteer. Her mother Erika was a German immigrant who moved to the Cleveland, Ohio, area when her husband got a job with U.S. Steel. Erika Melchior began by making and performing shows with fairy tale character puppets.

When Peggy reached her teen years, her mother gave her a couple of puppets of her own, and together the mother-daughter team performed at shopping malls and at events with the Easter Bunny and Santa Claus.

“Our business has morphed,” Pearson said. “My mother used to do cruise ships; now we do elementary schools and pre-schools.”

Some 40 years later, Pearson has handed down the puppet

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House Democrats’ leadership races reflect coming generational change

Only one House Democrat in the caucus’s 14-member elected leadership team is exiting the chamber next year, but that opening has created a competitive race for assistant speaker and cleared opportunities for other ambitious Democrats to run for the lower-ranking positions those candidates are vacating.

With Assistant Speaker Ben Ray Luján running for the open Senate seat in New Mexico, three lawmakers — Tony Cárdenas of California, David Cicilline of Rhode Island and Katherine M. Clark of Massachusetts — are vying to replace him as the fourth-ranking House Democrat.

The top three leaders who have led the caucus for nearly two decades, Speaker Nancy Pelosi, 80, House Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer, 81, and Majority Whip James E. Clyburn, 80, are expected to stay in those positions, according to several Democratic lawmakers and aides CQ Roll Call spoke with for this report.

The team forming below them represents the generational change many rank-and-file Democrats have long sought. All of the candidates running were first elected to the House in the past decade.

Pelosi has promised she wouldn’t serve as speaker beyond 2022, so whoever becomes assistant speaker is likely a potential candidate to replace her. Democratic Caucus Chairman Hakeem Jeffries, 50, first elected in 2012, is seeking reelection to the No. 5 leadership post unchallenged and is another potential speaker hopeful.

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The White House: Trump’s always-coming-soon health-care plan is coming soon

There has perhaps been no more frequently promised product than Trump’s comprehensive proposal on health care. Over and over, Trump has insisted there will be something to replace the Affordable Care Act. Over and over, he has set deadlines for when it will come. Over and over, those deadlines pass.

On Tuesday, White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany was asked when Trump’s proposal would appear, given that he promised it by Aug. 2 and then by Aug. 21 and then by Aug. 31.

“The president, in the next week or so, will be laying out his vision for health care,” McEnany said in response to a reporter’s question. “Some of that has already been put out there, like telemedicine and lowering the cost of drugs … and protecting preexisting conditions. But the president will be laying out some additional health-care steps in the coming, I would say, two weeks.”

Sure, Okay. It’s not like we’ve heard that before.

A review of a past Post compilation and from Kaiser Health News identifies more than two dozen occasions on which Trump alone has said either that a new proposal is coming at some point (without saying when) or that one is coming at a set time. Often, that set time is two weeks. Or the end of the month. Or “soon,” which we figured meant about a month for the purposes of the graphic below. At other times it’s been pegged to specific events such as the 2020 election.

Of the moving deadlines Trump set for release of his health-care proposal (which he described as “all ready” on Sept. 15), none is more important at the moment than the one he established in March 2019.

“If the decisions are held up, if we win on the termination of Obamacare,” he said of a challenge to the Affordable Care Act that’s in front of the Supreme Court, “we will have a plan that’s far better than Obamacare, including, very importantly, preexisting conditions, which I’ve always been in favor of.”

That case that’s before the Court would, in fact, eradicate protections for preexisting conditions.

But the broader point here is that the Obamacare case is yet to be determined — and could be resolved only after Trump nominates a replacement to Ruth Bader Ginsburg. In other words, there could be a new conservative majority on the bench, a third of them Trump nominees, which votes to dump the law. And, therefore, forces Trump’s hand on his always-two-weeks-away health-care proposal.

This is actually risky for Trump, the ostensible political goal of tossing Obamacare aside. A Fox News poll released last week showed that former vice president Joe Biden has an 8-point advantage over Trump on voter confidence to handle health care — a bigger margin than Biden’s overall lead in that poll. A 2020 campaign that’s centered on health care and the protection of affordable coverage for those with preexisting conditions is almost certainly a campaign in which Trump is at a disadvantage.

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Trump Says Supreme Court Pick Coming Friday or Saturday

About to nominate his third justice, incredibly.
Photo: Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

President Trump said on Monday morning that he expected to name his proposed replacement for Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court by Friday or Saturday, after her funeral services — contradicting his own press secretary, Kayleigh McEnany, who moments before had said the pick would be coming before Wednesday.

As he did previously, Trump also said that he would like the confirmation vote to happen before the election, as opposed to during the lame-duck session (an option that might reduce the political pressure for vulnerable Senate Republicans running in tough reelection races). And once again, he transparently tied this desire to possible litigation stemming from the election, which he has been laying the groundwork to contest for months.

If Trump does stick to his timeline, which is by no means assured, it would leave the Senate only 38 or 39 days before the election, an extraordinarily tight timeline to rush through a Supreme Court pick — and one that may push things to the postelection period, despite the president’s wishes.

So far, only two Republican senators have come out against a confirmation vote before the election: Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska. (Two more would need to join them for Democrats to be able to block the nomination, an unlikely possibility.) Trump criticized both on Monday morning, telling reporters that Collins will be “very badly hurt” by her stance.

Trump’s typically discursive comments on Monday also included a paean to Barbara Lagoa, one of his possible Supreme Court nominees; a wild claim that Ruth Bader Ginsburg may not have actually issued her dying plea that the next president install her replacement — “I don’t know that she said that, or was that written out by Adam Schiff and Schumer and Pelosi”; and a blunt but honest summation of the power dynamics at play behind the Supreme Court fight. “When you have the Senate, when you have the votes, you can sort of do what you want as long as you have it,” he said.

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