Small Bathroom Colors | Small Bathroom Paint Colors

Small bathrooms are a burden to us all. We could always use more space, but physical limitations prevent many from expanding their current bathroom. A terrific, easy and cheap way to make your bathroom seem larger is with paint.

Painting a stripes on an accent wall isn’t only trendy, but can make your bathroom appear larger.

If you think your bathroom is small, but want that real master feel, be sure to check out our painting tips and small bathroom colors that will make your small bathroom seem larger.

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1. Small Bathroom Paint Colors

The best way to make your bathroom or any room seem larger is to use bright paint colors. Some say that more white makes for a larger appearance, but that debate will go on for years to come.

This entire article is about optical illusion. Light and brightly colored walls are more reflective, making any space feel open and airy. Additionally, light colors help augment the effect of natural light (which we all love). As such, the following small bathroom paint colors will surely make your bathroom feel larger.

Best Paint Color for Small Bathrooms with No Windows

  1. Icy Blue
  2. Cream
  3. Soft Green
  4. White
  5. Pearl Gray
  6. Pink
  7. Yellow
  8. Aqua

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Same Tone

Similar hues can made your small bathroom look larger.

2. Keep All Same Tone

As I will get into later, just because light colors are smart small bathroom wall colors, the entire room does not have to be the same color. However, if you really want your small bathroom to feel like the master that you deserve, keep all colors within the same tone.

Light bathroom colors are great, but if you installed dark tile on the floor or in the shower, the light colors will not stand out. The large contrast will clog up the space and showcase how small your bathroom really is. We don’t want that.

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National Paint a Home Interior Costs

$1,679

Average Cost

$60

Minimum Cost

$4,300

Maximum Cost

Average Range:

$1,130
to
$1,826

National Average Cost $1,679
Minimum Cost $60
Maximum Cost $4,300
Average Range $1,130
to
$1,826

How do we get this data? This info is based on 12,082 cost profiles, as reported by ImproveNet members.


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3. Blend Tile Color & Wall Color

This tip jumps off the previous hack,

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Garden Mastery: Chrysanthemums fill our region with brilliant fall colors

Our gardening neighbors in the Midwestern, Eastern and Northern states welcome their fall season in predictable ways. The sun rises later in the morning, setting a bit earlier in the evening. Nighttime temperatures begin to dip. Bird species begin their southward migration to warmer climates. The real fall showstopper in these parts of our country is the dazzling display of leaves beginning to change color, from gold to reddish-orange, from crimson to brown.

The Southern California fall season is shorter in duration. Changes to our landscape and gardens arrive slowly, are more subtle and are too soon gone. While we don’t have the display of leaves changing color all around us, we do begin to notice that our garden plants are now beyond their peak, and bloomers have finished flowering.

It’s at this time of year that I wish for just a little something to brighten up my garden landscape. And then I find just what I was wishing for — at the supermarket, of all places! I spot rows of potted chrysanthemums, all wrapped in vivid foil colors. Yes, fall has arrived in Southern California.

These past several months, you may not have been able to travel farther than your local grocery or home improvement store. So, let me invite you to a virtual armchair “historical tour” on chrysanthemums. We’ll travel far and back in time to learn about this flower and plant.

Chrysanthemums, often called by their shortened name “mums,” naturally flower in the fall when days are short and nights are long. With blooms lasting for weeks, mums are easy to grow and come in a variety of sizes and colors. Perhaps you’ve heard of some of them by their common names: pompon, button, spray, cushion, spider and florist’s mums, a special variety bred to have long stems. Did you know that mums also enjoy some interesting symbolic meanings? Depending on which part of the world you come from, the flower can symbolize life and vitality, or death and sorrow.

Chrysanthemums are in the Asteraceae plant family and have a long and interesting history. Originating in Asia, where they were cultivated as a medicinal herb, chrysanthemums were introduced to Japan in the fifth century and are considered a symbol of the country itself. The Japanese call the chrysanthemum “kiku”; the flower blossom is the imperial crest for the Japanese royal family and is the country’s national flower. By the 17th century, the chrysanthemum was brought to Europe. The first flowers seen by Europeans may have been small, yellow and daisylike. Carl Linnaeus, the Swedish botanist, gave the chrysanthemum its Latin name from the Greek words chrysous, meaning “golden,” and anthemon, meaning “flower.”

First introduced to the U.S. during colonial times, the chrysanthemum gained ever-increasing popularity by the late 19th century with garden clubs promoting their special collections of new varieties. Today, gardeners can learn about all chrysanthemum flower types from the National Chrysanthemum Society’s classification system. The society’s website lists the flowers according to 13

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Why You Should Choose Bright Paint Colors (If You Want To)

I have a memory from when I was young—five or six—and I asked my mom what her favorite color was. “Green,” she said. “Because I like trees and being outside.” It hadn’t occurred to my baby brain that there had to be any specific reason for something to be your favorite. I suppose it’s not so different when you’re an adult—you learn that there is almost always a why, even if you can’t quite make sense of it in the moment. Why do we gravitate to some bright rooms more than others? Why does that bright pillow make you feel some kind of way?

The “color-in-context theory,” conceived by psychologists Andrew Elliot and Markus Maier in 2012, muses that “the physical and psychological context in which color is perceived is thought to influence its meaning and, accordingly, responses to it.” How we understand color, they argue, is not so much about aesthetics but about the associations we hold—certain colors mean certain things to us, relying on our previous experiences and interpretations to inform how we feel about them in the future. I would argue that this is how design operates as a whole. Good design is all about context.

Bright colors and kooky silhouettes have always sparked design joy for me—and as far as Instagram is concerned, I’m not alone. Brands like Aelfie, Abigail Bell Vintage, Dusen Dusen Home, and Coming Soon are just a few purveyors of the uniquely chaotic feel-good design I’m talking about. Almost the opposite of the “Tyranny of Terrazzo” or millennial minimalism—this wave of furniture that’s somehow graphically retro and bizarrely futuristic, pattern-clashing that would make your grandmother gasp, color combos that force you to wince before you eventually think they’re edgy. It’s as if the inspiring, soul-soothing parts of the internet were a tangible room you could hang out in.

Despite how chaotic it may be to have a rug that clashes with the coffee table that clashes with the art on the walls, decor that is full of life somehow brings me peace. As Color of the Year becomes Colors of the Year, and color-blocked rooms begin popping up in stylish spaces around the world, it is a helpful reminder to choose what moves you. “My color philosophy is extremely personal,” Justina Blakeney told Clever editor Nora Taylor in a recent episode of AD Visits. “For me, it really is about your own connection to that color and your own color associations.” Color helps to create a reality that thrills you and helps remind you who you are at your core, even on the days when it’s hard to remember.

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Why The Rock Damaged His Own House, Ty Pennington Returns to Reality TV, 2021 Colors of the Year

House Party” is realtor.com®’s official podcast about the overlapping worlds of real estate and pop culture, hosted by Natalie Way and Rachel Stults. Click the player above to hear our take on this week’s hot topics.

In an extremely on-brand move, actor and former WWE star Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson inflicted some serious pain on the gate of his rented Atlanta mansion. He’s filming a movie there and has been living in an eight-bedroom, 8.5-bathroom Southern Colonial estate. But why, pray tell, did he go “Fast and Furious” on the front gate? We get into it on this week’s episode.

Other topics we discuss:

  • Ty Pennington‘s triumphant return as host of a new HGTV show, “Ty Breaker”
  • The colors of the year, according to several paint companies
  • A “Star Trek”–themed house that you can rent for $200,000 a month
  • This week’s celebrity real estate winner and loser

Want more “House Party”? Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts. And please: Throw us a five-star rating if you like what you hear. The more good ratings and reviews we have, the easier it is for people to find us.

Want to chime in? Have your own crazy home-related story you’re dying to share? We’re all ears, eagerly waiting to discuss all of your burning real estate questions on “The Mailbox” segment. Email us at [email protected], follow us on Facebook and Instagram, or tweet us @housepartypod on Twitter.

The post ‘House Party’ Podcast: Why The Rock Damaged His Own House, Ty Pennington Returns to Reality TV, 2021 Colors of the Year appeared first on Real Estate News & Insights | realtor.com®.

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Joanna Gaines’ 4 Favorite Kitchen Colors Aren’t What You’d Expect

Is shiplap a color?

Not exactly. But Fixer Upper host Joanna Gaines did transform the home renovation space with her unique design style that’s been described as “modern farmhouse chic.” Even years after her HGTV series ended, DIY enthusiasts are still obsessed with copying her look in their own homes.

And Gaines is happy to share advice with eager followers. She currently contributes to her quarterly magazine, Magnolia Journal, plus released an entire book focused on creating a beautiful home retreat you’ll never want to leave. Homebody: A Guide to Creating Spaces You Never Want to Leave is a bestseller.

Recently, the mother of five revealed what colors she thinks work best for a kitchen via her company, Magnolia Home.

‘Fixer Upper’ popularized 1 very specific style

RELATED: The Top 10 Episodes of ‘Fixer Upper,’ According to IMDb

The HGTV show that made Gaines famous was both celebrated and criticized for always sticking to a formula. Even though the series featured different clients with all sorts of homes, the result always had that Joanna Gaines touch. Some common themes included white walls, wood floors, neutral furniture, open shelving, and vintage-looking accessories.

But occasionally Gaines did step out of the box to include a modern piece of furniture or a wild pattern. And now that Fixer Upper is over, fans are starting to see even more facets to the renovation expert’s repertoire.

Joanna Gaines spends so much time designing kitchens

Joanna Gaines
Joanna Gaines | Rob Kim/Getty Images

Like so many homeowners, Gaines knows that the center of any home is the place where the food gets made.

“The kitchen is the heartbeat of home, which makes it one of my favorite spaces to design. It’s been so inspiring to watch families gravitate toward their kitchens again and again this year, maybe more than ever before,” she told KILZ, where she has a brand partnership for her Magnolia Home paint line.

And she’s not afraid to explore color palettes that go beyond neutral in that important space. Magnolia’s senior designer Kristen Bufton revealed some of the best color combinations for kitchens which were all vetted and approved by Gaines herself, PureWow reported.

Even neutrals can be fun in a ‘Fixer Upper’ inspired kitchen

Most of Gaines’ designs feature lots of neutral tones, especially white kitchens that are bright, clean, and modern looking. But when it comes to color recommendations, the Magnolia team recommends branching out a little bit.

First, white doesn’t ever mean stark white. The first color combination Bufton recommends is a softer white with cream that’s infused with warmth and goes with everything. “White on white paint is super versatile because it acts as a backdrop for any décor style, including modern, industrial, traditional, etc.,” she said.

Another can’t-miss option is gray and white, which also counts as neutral. You’ll be channeling your inner Gaines when accessorizing with pops of color throughout so the whole kitchen isn’t so monochromatic.

The designer recommends infusing some color

The first colorful idea is

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Create a fall pocket garden bursting with fiery autumn colors

Japanese maples differ in size, but all end the season in a blaze of color.

Japanese maples differ in size, but all end the season in a blaze of color.

New York Botanical Gardens

Japanese maples, burning bush and other autumn wonders should be putting on a show this week and garden centers and nurseries are filled with bargains.

If you want your own view of autumn splendor, consider adding a fall pocket garden to the landscape. As your new plants mature and the fiery autumn colors return year after year from your fiery new fall garden, you’ll remember 2020 with at least a few warm thoughts.

Many fall events may be canceled due to coronavirus, but you’ll have a beautiful homecoming just outside your window and score better yardage if you tackle this design challenge and celebrate that nobody can cancel the beauty of the fall season.

Start with a focal point: Japanese maples for the win

For a small garden or if you have limited space, start your autumn theme garden with one of the Japanese maples or Acer palmatums. The Dissectum types of Japanese maples have finely divided or dissected leaves and this makes them slow growers with a delicate appearance. It also means you won’t need to rake up the leaves once they fall as they quickly decay and improve the soil without smothering the plants below.

Look for varieties with spectacular fall color such as ‘Orgeola’ with fiery orange red foliage on a 6-foot tree or one of the similar varieties offered in Western Washington nurseries this month. Fall is a good time to buy and transplant Japanese maples.

For something different, grow a Sourwood tree

If you want to grow beyond Japanese maples for a small tree with autumn color, search out the sweet color and form of a Sourwood tree or Oxydendrum arboretum. This tree has four seasons of interest with fragrant bell-shaped flowers, seed capsules that hang on the tree all winter, and fall color that may have the neighbors calling the fire department — this tree is that hot.

The only garden gossip on this autumn beauty is that it has shallow roots so it does not like to grow in a lawn or have shrubs planted beneath its graceful branches.

Add more foliage and berries with lower shrubs

I like the brilliant purple berries of Beauty Berry or Calicarpa. The graceful, arching branches show off metallic purple berries in the fall and the colors work well with Japanese maples. You can add the flaming orange or yellow foliage of barberries, scarlet leaves of the Euonymus alatus ‘Burning Bush’ or any of the Nandina ‘Heavenly Bamboo’ that come in various sizes and leaf colors.

Look for fall foliage shrubs turning color in your neighborhood. This will give you more ideas for creating your autumn dream team.

The goal here is to huddle up these complementary team players (the shrubs) around the star of your fall garden (the focal point tree) by arranging them behind or in front of your focal point.

Make a power play with

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Bold interior paint colors are back, offering vibrancy to indoor life that neutrals can’t provide | Home/Garden

 

When Christine and Robert Casanova moved into a century-old Victorian side hall in New Orleans in 2017, the home’s central, windowless room was a blank slate, a design challenge and a point of contention.

Robert wanted a “warm, dark, cocoon-y” library with heavily saturated blue walls. Christine believed the hue would be intense and claustrophobic.

“I thought it would be too much of a contrast, like it didn’t belong in the house,” Christine Casanova said.

The couple hired interior designers Penny Francis and Casi St. Julian, of Eclectic Home, to build out the space with floor-to-ceiling bookshelves, a rope-wrapped chandelier and a grass cloth wallpaper accent wall. The result is a snug, intimate room where guests inevitably congregate during parties.

“I had trepidation about the bright, clean, crisp house and the dark, intense room,” Christine Casanova said. “But the dark, intense room is the place everyone wants to be because it feels cozy and safe.”

Francis says the Casanovas are among many clients who are making bolder decisions when it comes to color. “People have finally opened up to the richness of color and are not as afraid,” she said.

Bold colors are trending

Sherwin-Williams’ 2021 paint trend predictions include intense blues, muted greens and reds, vibrant pinks and warm whites. Jewel tones like emerald greens and cobalts continue to be a mainstay.

“Emerald green was Pantone’s color of the year in 2013,” said interior designer Maureen Stevens. “Ever since, it has that longevity. People are saying it’s a classic now. It’s considered neutral to do a blue wall — I think emerald is as well.”



sherwinwilliams.jpg

Jaipur Pink makes a bold debut at Sherwin-Williams.




While blush or “millennial pink” was ubiquitous in recent years, designers say this trend has given way to more saturated versions of the color.

“Sherwin-Williams came out with Jaipur Pink, which … is very reminiscent of Old World architecture. It’s definitely deeper than a blush,” Stevens said. “Millennial pink is out because it is a more muted pink. Now people are like, ‘Let’s embrace pink for its entirety.’”

Beige and gray are out

According to interior designer Nomita Joshi-Gupta, the more time people spend quarantined in their homes, the more they long for color. Although white walls remain soothing to the eye, there’s a movement away from neutral palettes of beige, white and gray.

“Your eye needs stimulation,” Joshi-Gupta said. “Just like one needs different tastes in food, your eye also needs visual cues and excitement.”



GREEN 2.jpg

Alexandrite is an updated take on the classic emerald green.




“Gray was a mainstay for a long time, but now grays and gray taupes are on the way out,” Stevens said. “People are opting for a clean slate of white or something more bold as far as more jewel tones and going crazier.”

Back to black

Once considered the ultimate signifier of teenage rebellion, black walls are a valid design choice — and one that’s trending. Black can make a room feel intimate and expansive because

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How to Mix Bold Colors in Your Interior Design

Each week, Mansion Global tackles a topic with an elite group of designers from around the world who work on luxury properties. This week, we look at how to blend bold colors.

Color is a personal thing—and when it comes to using it in the home, people have strong opinions. “Color can create emotion, drama and depth,” said Sari Mina Ross of Sari Mina Ross Interior Design in Denver.“Choosing colors is like selecting from a candy shop for the senses.”

But there’s a way to do it right. For tips on mixing and matching like a pro, follow these tips from top designers.

More: The Wonder of Wood Paneling

Go for Tonal Blends

“Opt for tones that are bold; not loud. Think deep and moody jade green, for example, as opposed to a screaming fuchsia. I tend toward blues because they’re calming and passionate while grounded in nature.

“I like to stay within three variations of one color. It maintains harmony in a space and gives a sense of depth. In a guest bedroom, for example, I would do a rich blue and go higher in tint and lower in intensity. Add some black for pulls or molding, and white bedding or upholstery for the sofa or rug.

“While there aren’t any places that are off limits, I prefer smaller spaces for big color to create jewel-box moments. A powder room or a high ceiling are great places to use big, bold color.

“I don’t love bold color in the entrance—because it slaps you in the face too soon. It’s good to ease into a space and let the color become bolder as you progress through it. And, it doesn’t have to be just paint and textile, you can also get a great dose of color from wallpaper.

“A great way to mix bold tones is to look to the opposite side of the color wheel. If you have blues in a room, mix in some oranges and reds. It will immediately inject a space with more energy. Keep in mind that these colors can (and should) be used on different textures.”

A pink throw pops against jewel-toned blue walls in a home designed by Sari Mina Ross.


John Bressler

— Sari Mina Ross of Sari Mina Ross Interior Design in Denver

More: Shelf Life: Creative Ideas for Clever Storage

Be Strategic

“If you’re trying to set a specific mood in a room, utilizing bold colors is a great way to make a statement and set the tone.

“Because of their energizing powers, bold colors are best suited in rooms that are not constantly lived in, but rather, pass-through rooms. Dining rooms, hallways, powder rooms or libraries are all great spaces to infuse with bold color for that reason.”

“Stick to one color family (varying tones of greens or blues, for example) rather than competing colors. This can create a cool monochromatic effect.”

“Typically, I wouldn’t do the entire room in the bold color but opt to

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"Yellow," She Said! 4 Tips for Choosing Exterior House Colors

It’s not often that a client is adamant about a house color. At least not to the extent of being so fixed on one color family that all others are not available for consideration.

With that caveat, I began to look at various yellow paint colors for the exterior of a Victorian home in a Boston-area suburb. Not only was the only option to be “Yellow,” but the painting was going to be done by an area company specializing in a ‘never-paint-again!’ method, and so it had to be the right yellow to last…and last…and never be changed.

Originally built as a single family house, as were most structures of this general style, this house has been made into apartments. And, the house was already yellow.

Selecting a different yellow for the body, with a more subdued color for the doors and an earthy color for porch floor and steps, was not a huge color change but it was a significant one overall.

The new palette: the painting company said they would tint their own product to these colors from Sherwin Williams that I selected for her:

  • Body: SW 6374 – Torchlight
  • Shingle accent: SW 2817 – Rookwood Amber
  • Window and door casing trims, and stair risers: SW 6372 – Inviting Ivory
  • Porch floors and stair treads, front and back: SW 7053 – Adaptive Shade, a stoney gray
  • Front and back doors: SW 6278 – Cloak Gray, a deep plum

I had specified Rookwood Amber to be used on the details of millwork as well, which would have been a lovely detail, and would not have appeared over-decorated. Some of the column detail was done, but other details that were to have been done on the peak trim and some of the other decorative millwork would have completed the picture. Unfortunately this was not all done to specifications.

Ultimately of course it’s up to the homeowner, who is the person hiring the painting contractor. Sometimes the finishing touches are omitted due to the budget constraints and the result, even if beautiful, seems to be missing something.

Four quick tips

  • In homes with architectural detail, consider using color in the architectural details as a way to add balance and refinement. “Painting out” the detail sometimes works but the inclusion of the right, subtle color can make a world of positive difference in the overall appearance of your home.
  • Even a simple color change can make a big difference. In this case, where Yellow was the only color family considered, it was a matter of getting the right one to suit the building.
  • Testing: you can see that the tiny strips of color-tests, applied close together, don’t provide you with much ‘information’ about how the color will look on the house. It’s important to test on large areas that you can move around the building at different times of day, on the different surfaces.
  • Testing your paint colors on primed card stock or even pieces of wood (ideally, using siding to replicate
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7 Creative Ways to Add Colors to Your Home Decor

Are you scared of color because you are scared of committing? Color is an effective way to bring personality, and create a focal point in your home’s spaces. Unexpected utilization of colors speaks volumes about your personal style as well as sets your home apart.

Decorating your space, in terms of color, shouldn’t be challenging. Actually, it’s as effortless as 60-30-10. If you look at some of the example rooms in a designer’s portfolio, or in magazines, you’ll confirm this to be true – most rooms are invariably divided in percentages of 60-30-10. So why is this the case? It’s because of the human tendency to view an overall theme in 60% hue, unifying the coloration, followed by 30% that entails visual interest while the remaining 10% adds some little spark.

When handling your home décor, you should divide them into these percentages:

  • 10% of an accent color
  • 30% of secondary color
  • 60% of a dominant color

The following are some of the creative ways to add colors to your home décor:

1. Use Color to Get Emotional

Everyone associates colors with something they represent. For instance, red can represent warmth, yellow; the sun, blue; the sea and air, and green often represents trees. Generally, all these are considered to be emotional responses to color, compared to intellectual responses. Therefore, you can utilize the emotional associations to bring out their greatest effects within a space. You can do so by deciding on the emotional impact you desire in a room. Do you want it to be lively? If yes, then yellows and reds are the ideal choices. Do you desire subdued? If yes, then browns and blues are the best.

It’s really important to note is that the color you settle for ought to reflect the activities performed in its space. For instance, if it’s for rest, such as a family room or a bedroom, you need to settle for darker values of color which relate to restfulness such as browns, blues and greens.

2. Consider Contrast

High contrast spaces appear clearer as well as more defined compared to a space that includes low contrasts. A high contrast space is one that utilizes dark and light values of color in combination with light gold. Low contrast rooms, on the other hand, utilize sage green with saffron yellow. The golden rule is to use high contrast to improve your room’s formality and high contrast colors to introduce soothing qualities.

When paired, white and black are formal in appearance. They’re not like a tuxedo. Combining black and white is less of a color value and more of subtracting or adding light. However, white with beige boasts a low contrast coupled with a feeling of calmness. By combining black and white with gray, you’ll enjoy a low key atmosphere and it also helps to create a restful space.

3. Flow with Color

For you to create a color flow from a single room to another, all you need to do is select a …

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