Interior Design brings color to the Parade of Homes | Real Estate

The Housing and Building Association’s Parade of Homes started this weekend and continues today and next weekend, with eight homes that are available for online touring, and seven homes that are available for in-person visits. With the popularity of home remodeling shows from areas across the country, it’s easy to stay on top of home interior styles elsewhere, but the Parade is a great opportunity to see the styles that locals love.

The experts say that the Grand Valley is typically a few years behind the rest of the country when it comes to home interior design choices, but one thing is consistent with local design preferences regardless of whether a home was designed in Tuscan style back in 2006 or in modern farmhouse in 2020: rustic never quite goes away, and it’s not uncommon to see the outside brought inside with textures, colors and materials during the Parade of Homes.

“Western Colorado is more nature-oriented,” said Courtney Carrigan, interior designer with Porter Homes. Although the Porter Homes Parade entry has tile flooring throughout the house, wood flooring remains a popular choice for most people, whether it’s hardwood, engineered wood, luxury vinyl tile (LVT) or luxury vinyl plank (LVP).

Sitting on the edge of Colorado National Monument, the Porter Homes house on Broadway features quite a few wood accents, even though none of them are on the floor.

“The biggest feature in the great room is the 16-foot tall ceilings with the timber beams,” Carrigan said, adding that the outdoor kitchen and the front entryway also feature great ceiling detail with wooden beams and tongue-in-groove looks.

“Rustic is more regional,” Carrigan said, “timber beams are a trend everywhere; it goes with the farmhouse look, but it will stick here in western Colorado because of our proximity to the mountains.”

Neutral colors are still popular for permanent features, but greige, tan, charcoal and taupe are being added to the white, black and gray palette to make a home feel warmer and more inviting.

The Maves Construction Parade home is similar to last year’s Parade home, with a warm, contemporary look.

“The walls are light taupe,” said Marge Csikos, with MAC Design Studio, the interior designer for the Maves Parade home. “I’m not a proponent of white walls unless someone is hardcore, super contemporary. A little color on the wall is better.”

The Maves home also has some nice, bright pops of color, which is a trend that’s being embraced by many right now. Look for the teals and blues in the office and bright, happy colors of orange, green a blue in the downstairs bedroom.

The Lopez Construction home also has several punches of color, including an bluesy accent wall in the kitchen and a bed wall that combines color and texture.

“I’ve used accessories and artwork from local artists,” said Kendi Sisak of Design Works Studio. “We have really wonderful artwork by local artists. They’re very kind and generous, and I’m excited to display their artwork.”

Like many of the

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Color your spring with fall bulbs

Carole McCray
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If you have, over the years, looked at gardens where there is a profusion of color with spring-flowering bulbs and wished for the same showstopping display in your garden, then now is the time to think about planting spring-flowering bulbs.

I had been remiss some years and did not plant certain bulbs or as many as I should have, and then came spring, and I had regrets. So, this fall, make time for spring color in your garden and plant fall bulbs in the perennial bed and beneath trees and shrubs. If space is a problem, fall bulbs can be planted in pots, containers and window boxes, and even be forced to bloom indoors.

Not all bulbs are the same. That is, some fall bulbs work as perennials, others are considered annuals. Daffodils and scilla are reliable as perennials. Tulips and hyacinths have become annuals for me. The National Garden Bureau suggests treating them as annuals, and to check bloom times so you can enjoy a long season of flowers. Since tulips and hyacinths often bloom as annuals, the National Garden Bureau suggests experimenting with new color combinations every year.

Some of their tips for planting spring-flowering bulbs:

• The best times for planting are mid-October through mid-November. Early December is the latest for planting. Plant bulbs about three weeks before the soil begins to freeze.

• Well-drained soil and about six to eight hours of sun are the ideal locations for bulbs.

• Your selection of bulbs should include bulbs with different bloom times. Early-, mid- and late-season-blooming bulbs will guarantee a colorful spring show of flowering bulbs.

Carole McCray resides in Cape May, New Jersey and is an award-winning garden writer who has been writing a monthly garden column, The Potting Shed, for regional newspapers for nearly 20 years. Her articles have been published in The Christian Science Monitor Newspaper, Coastal Living Magazine, Cape May Magazine, Growise Garden Guide and Ideals Magazine. She won the Garden Writer’s Association Award for newspaper writing for The Christian Science Monitor Newspaper.

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In the Garden column: Color your spring with fall bulbs – Lifestyle – The Topeka Capital-Journal

If you have, over the years, looked at gardens where there is a profusion of color with spring-flowering bulbs and wished for the same showstopping display in your garden, then now is the time to think about planting spring-flowering bulbs.

I had been remiss some years and did not plant certain bulbs or as many as I should have, and then came spring, and I had regrets. So, this fall, make time for spring color in your garden and plant fall bulbs in the perennial bed and beneath trees and shrubs. If space is a problem, fall bulbs can be planted in pots, containers and window boxes, and even be forced to bloom indoors.

Not all bulbs are the same. That is, some fall bulbs work as perennials, others are considered annuals. Daffodils and scilla are reliable as perennials. Tulips and hyacinths have become annuals for me. The National Garden Bureau suggests treating them as annuals, and to check bloom times so you can enjoy a long season of flowers. Since tulips and hyacinths often bloom as annuals, the National Garden Bureau suggests experimenting with new color combinations every year.

Some of their tips for planting spring-flowering bulbs:
• The best times for planting are mid-October through mid-November. Early December is the latest for planting. Plant bulbs about three weeks before the soil begins to freeze.
• Well-drained soil and about six to eight hours of sun are the ideal locations for bulbs.
• Your selection of bulbs should include bulbs with different bloom times. Early-, mid- and late-season-blooming bulbs will guarantee a colorful spring show of flowering bulbs.
Carole McCray resides in Cape May, New Jersey and is an award-winning garden writer who has been writing a monthly garden column, The Potting Shed, for regional newspapers for nearly 20 years. Her articles have been published in The Christian Science Monitor Newspaper, Coastal Living Magazine, Cape May Magazine, Growise Garden Guide and Ideals Magazine. She won the Garden Writer’s Association Award for newspaper writing for The Christian Science Monitor Newspaper.

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A teacher with terminal cancer wanted to repaint his house in his wife’s preferred color, knowing she’ll outlive him. Friends swarmed to help him

The 45-year-old teacher from Sioux Falls, South Dakota, started chemotherapy treatments when he was diagnosed last year, but in July doctors told him he had only months left to live.

“I found out I was not going to win the fight,” Gjoraas told CNN on Monday.

In July, after teaching for 22 years, he made the tough decision to pack up his classroom at Washington High School and retire to spend more time with his wife and three children. Gjoraas shared the news on social media, and since then, the community has rallied around his family.

“My community has really gone to bat for my family and I over and over and over,” he said.

People organized fundraisers for the family, and most recently a dozen people came over to help paint the outside of his house — something Gjoraas wanted to do for his wife.

The house was painted Saturday.

Gjoraas, a craft beer enthusiast, said he mentioned the idea to his friend, retired teacher Doug Rinken, over drinks. Gjoraas and his family have lived in the home for more than 20 years and he said it was time for it to be repainted.

“I just asked him if next summer, which I probably won’t be here for, if he can paint it for my wife,” he said.

The Gjoraas family wouldn’t have to wait till next year. Rinken organized about a dozen other teachers and friends to help paint the brown house blue — a color that Gjoraas’ wife, Lisa, picked out.
“You want to help in any way you can, but you know that whatever you do, it isn’t going to be enough,” Rinken told the Argus Leader, the local newspaper, on Saturday. “Even this what we’re doing today, it isn’t going to change anything, but I just hope it makes him feel a little more comfortable. It maybe makes us feel a little better too.”
Tim Gjoraas holds a Budweiser beer that he drank in honor of a late colleague.

It took the group a little over half a day to paint the house. Then they cracked open some beers and shared stories.

Gjoraas said he is very appreciative of all the support the community and friends have given his family. He said he is soaking up all the memories he can get with his family and having a beer with friends on days he feels good.

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Cozy, with dash of color



a hotel room with a couch and a chair in front of a window: SEPT. 24, 2020 - Heathered Boucle Fring Throw from Pottery Barn. Photo potterybarn.com


© Provided by Boston Herald
SEPT. 24, 2020 – Heathered Boucle Fring Throw from Pottery Barn. Photo potterybarn.com

It seems like we went from summer to fall in a snap this year. One minute we were sweating in 90-degree mid-August, and not a week later we were sending our sweaters to the dry cleaner to start mixing them into our wardrobes. And while the outerwear debuted this week, we’re still getting ready to spend a lot more time inside as we wait winter, and the pandemic, out.

So let’s get after autumn-ifying the inside of our homes, shall we? And let’s make each room as cozy and welcoming as possible, with a dash of seasonal color here and of celebration of harvest time there.

And how about we start at the front door. The 18-inch Dried Fall Wheat Wreath ($55 on etsy.com) is a rustic but minimalist design, and its light color looks dramatic against a dark gray, green or black door. Meanwhile, the Autumn Abundance Wreath ($179 on balsamhill.com) is resplendent on nearly any color background, with its warm earth tones by way of life-like fall leaves, berries and pinecones.



  • a brown wooden surface


    © Provided by Boston Herald


    SEPT. 24, 2020 – Dried Fall Wheat Wreath from Etsy. Photo etsy.com



  • a vase of flowers on a table


    © Provided by Boston Herald


    SEPT. 24, 2020 – Autumm Abundance Foliage Wreath from Balsam Hill. Photo balsamhill.com

Chilly temps mean one thing in my house: It’s time to snuggle up. And that, of course, requires great throw blankets. It’s tough to find any better than the Heathered Boucle Fringe Throws ($49 on potterybarn.com). Sure it’s the gorgeous, soft texture that feels like a sweater, but it’s also the beautifully muted colors they come in — soft shades like fig and sage, oatmeal and mineral blue.

Or the super-soft Chappy Wrap, created by a New England-based company run by a mom and daughter team. The cushy and stylish blankets ($135 on chappywrap.com) sport fab designs like maps of Nantucket, buffalo checks and demure schools of fish in the Herring Bone Blanket.

What would a blanket be without a pillow? I love the folksy-meets artisanal allure of kilim—a flat tapestry-weave traditionally produced in countries of the former Persian Empire. They’re in warm fall colors—rusts, tomato reds, taupes and creams — that work so well in almost any design environment from contemporary to country.



a blue and white striped blanket: Kilim pillows. Getty Images


© Provided by Boston Herald
Kilim pillows. Getty Images

And whether or not you have a fireplace in your abode, it’s easy (and far cheaper) to create the same vibe with candles—with an even more refined scent to imbue the room. At no time of year can I pass up Jo Malone’s fragrances, but especially not in the fall, when the olfactory genius puts out masterpieces like mimosa & cardamom candle ($69 on saksfifthavenue.com). One of my relatively new discoveries is P.F. Candle Co. based in Cali, which churns out lovely spice-centric candles such as smoky cinnamon ($20 on pfcandleco.com) and earthy ones like teakwood & tobacco ($29 on

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Joanna Gaines Shares Her Favorite Cozy Kitchen Color Combinations for Fall

Joanna Gaines shared her favorite kitchen paint color combinations based on her Magnolia Home line with the paint brand KILZ, and her picks will give any space a cozy atmosphere.



a room filled with furniture and a table: Joanna Gaines shared her favorite kitchen paint color combinations, and her picks will give any space a cozy atmosphere.


© Magnolia Home
Joanna Gaines shared her favorite kitchen paint color combinations, and her picks will give any space a cozy atmosphere.

All of Joanna’s favorite color combos have one aspect in common: They include white. In her four favorite color combinations, she pairs white with cream, bold blue, gray, and light blue or green.

The white and cream color combo offers a bit more versatility. You can take it in any direction–modern, industrial, traditional–and even switch it up as time goes on without having to repaint. If you’re looking for more of a moody vibe, Joanna suggests going with a bold blue hue. “We always keep the walls neutral when using a prominent darker cabinet color,” she said in a press email.



a dining room table in front of a window: kitchen with dark cabinets


© Magnolia Home
kitchen with dark cabinets

Another one of her ideal pairings is most often used in traditional kitchen styles: gray and white. “You can interchange these colors easily since they are both neutrals, although I would recommend avoiding a monochromatic scheme of all gray,” she said. “I encourage you to play with fun hardware, lighting, and rugs to add pops of color and texture throughout the space.”

If you’re more attracted to color, Joanna recommends going with a light blue or green and white color combo for its subtle and classic characteristics. “We love Emmie’s Room (JG-13), because it’s the perfect calming combination of green and blue and reminds me of the ocean,” she said.

If you want to bring these color combos to life, you can explore Joanna’s collection of paints with KILZ here.

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Joanna Gaines Shares Her Favorite Cozy Kitchen Color Combinations

Joanna Gaines shared her favorite kitchen paint color combinations based on her Magnolia Home line with the paint brand KILZ, and her picks will give any space a cozy atmosphere.

All of Joanna’s favorite color combos have one aspect in common: They include white. In her four favorite color combinations, she pairs white with cream, bold blue, gray, and light blue or green.

The white and cream color combo offers a bit more versatility. You can take it in any direction–modern, industrial, traditional–and even switch it up as time goes on without having to repaint. If you’re looking for more of a moody vibe, Joanna suggests going with a bold blue hue. “We always keep the walls neutral when using a prominent darker cabinet color,” she said in a press email.

kitchen with dark cabinets

Magnolia Home

Another one of her ideal pairings is most often used in traditional kitchen styles: gray and white. “You can interchange these colors easily since they are both neutrals, although I would recommend avoiding a monochromatic scheme of all gray,” she said. “I encourage you to play with fun hardware, lighting, and rugs to add pops of color and texture throughout the space.”

If you’re more attracted to color, Joanna recommends going with a light blue or green and white color combo for its subtle and classic characteristics. “We love Emmie’s Room (JG-13), because it’s the perfect calming combination of green and blue and reminds me of the ocean,” she said.

If you want to bring these color combos to life, you can explore Joanna’s collection of paints with KILZ here.

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This Kitchen Makeover Makes the Case for Bold Color Blocking

AFTER: The mint green wall balances the deep tones of the teal cabinets and the yellow shine of the brass backsplash and hardware.

So Camille and Carole set about reorganizing the space, focusing on relocating elements and circulation so that their client’s living-dining-cooking spaces flowed better and centered around an unexpected multifunctional feature: “two back-to-back benches, one for the dining table and the other for the living room,” says Camille. By placing the bench so that it serves both the kitchen/dining and living rooms, it also acts as a de facto divider between the two spaces. To further delineate this separation, they placed a partition with clear glass and a black frame that stretched from the top of the bench to the underside of the ceiling. The glass partition was a specific request from the client, drawing the eye up to the high ceiling while still maintaining views across the spaces.

The wall in the kitchen is painted with Farrow & Ball’s Teresa’s Green.

In the kitchen, Coci Studio further emphasized the ceiling height with two different strategies: “We extended the cabinets up to the ceiling along one wall, using the verticality of the space, and then along another wall only used lower cabinets. The two opposite strategies play with a single characteristic of the space,” explains Camille. When it came to deciding on a material palette, the idea was for the kitchen to be “a composition of elements in brass, marble, and light,” Camille says. A white marble countertop with undulating yellow-gray veining contrasts with a shining brass backsplash, cabinet hardware, and toe kick—all set against a mint background, free of upper cabinets that would clutter the space. The lower cabinets and an adjacent wall with full-height cabinetry were outfitted with wood doors, but rather than leaving them with a natural finish, Coco Studio selected a deep green stain that employed a dramatic color choice without totally masking the movement and organic nature of the wood.

The ash wood cabinets contrast with the Portuguese marble countertop, which has grooves cut into the countertop for drainage.

A key element of the kitchen was the ventilation hood, which Camille notes “is usually not the most attractive object in the kitchen. It’s often overlooked, camouflaged.” But, she determined, it has the potential to be a beautiful focal point, “giving character to a kitchen,” and so Coci Studio clad it in the same shining brass as the backsplash and gave it a strong, sleek geometrical form. It sits almost like a piece of sculpture on the wall, simple yet evocative.

The spice shelf was custom-made with hooks and a towel rack.

The table in the living area marries the marble of the kitchen counters and the metal of the glass partition.

In the living room, Camille and Carole continued elements found in the kitchen, designing a small coffee table with the rest of the marble from the countertop and continuing the same metal used for the glass partition frames. “We imagined this space

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The White House Rose Garden Runs Into More Trouble, Dulux Names Color of the Year, and More News This Week

From significant business changes to noteworthy product launches, there’s always something new happening in the world of design. In this weekly roundup, AD PRO has everything you need to know.

In the News

The White House Rose Garden Remodel Runs Into More Trouble

Recent changes to the White House Rose Garden had already sparked their fair share of controversy—as AD decorative arts editor Mitchell Owens investigated at length. Now, the garden is back in the news, thanks to a series of repairs that have already been required. This week, CNN reported on this development, stating that the problem centered around issues of water drainage. Hopefully, more flaws won’t spring anew.

Century Furniture Rides a Wave of Changes Catalyzed by the Pandemic

Members of design industry are very familiar with Century Furniture—the Hickory, North Carolina–based company that has long served as an embodiment of American manufacturing. Usually, Century makes headlines around High Point Market. But recently, it was the subject of an extensive Wall Street Journal feature. The article detailed how the brand has handled the past few months of challenges and widespread uncertainty—from order shifts to ongoing health concerns. 

COVID-19’s Impact on Galleries Comes Into Clearer Focus

While it was apparent from the outset of the coronavirus pandemic that the business of galleries was bound to suffer, a new survey has made that fact more numerically indisputable. Organized by Art Basel and UBS, the study was covered by the New York Times this week. Overall, affluent individuals continue to make purchases, but sales have slowed, dropping 36% for modern and contemporary galleries. 

Business

Dulux Shares Its 2021 Color of the Year Pick

And the winner is…Brave Ground. That’s the news from British paint company Dulux. The color, which is brown and earthy in tone, could just be a new go-to neutral. Marianne Shillingford, creative director of Dulux U.K., stated, “The colors on our walls are the backdrop to how we live our life. For many of us, lockdown has served to emphasize how important our home environment has become; it has been the place where we work, learn, relax. It can lift us up, nurture us, comfort us.”

Openings

Gucci Garden Opens for Virtual Tours

Designed by Alessandro Michele and located on Florence’s Piazza della Signoria, Gucci Garden is now welcoming visitors to tour rooms, objects, and exhibitions throughout its virtual space. The garden concept was opened—in real life—two years ago, as an immersive museum showcasing the brand’s clothing, accessories, art, and other items. It is also home to shoppable pieces from the Gucci Décor collection, and a collection of magazines and antique books.

Good Works

Kips Bay Boys & Girls Club President’s Dinner Makes for a Virtual Event to Remember

This year’s Kips Bay Boys & Girls Club President’s Dinner may have taken place through computer, tablet, and phone screens, but that didn’t mean it wasn’t a smashing success. Attendees were sent cocktail kits ahead of time, and encouraged to dress up. Dinner cochair Bunny Williams introduced her husband

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Kale and cabbage color the fall and winter garden – Lifestyle – fosters.com

Plant ornamental kales and cabbages for texture and color in the fall and winter garden. I planted several varieties and placed them in containers, the garden and even a window box. Surprisingly, they weathered well in zone 7 and were not removed until early spring the following year.

The ornamental kale and cabbage are not grown for flavor, but when added to your autumn garden, they lend a decorative touch through the winter. Frilly, but not delicate, they survive the erratic weather patterns from late fall through the spring. The plants are showy and come in an array of colors. You will find them in shades of deep purple, pink, red and white. They are not heat-tolerant, but they can tolerate the cold, and can survive winter temperatures as low as 5 degrees F. The colors of ornamental kale and cabbage are made brighter when they experience light and moderate frosts.

Ornamental kales and cabbages complement so many other fall plants. Pair them with chrysanthemums, the russet sedums, fall pansies and asters to echo the palette of autumn’s rich tones. There are many possibilities for displaying kale and cabbage to brighten the fall and winter garden. Try grouping kale and cabbage in pots at an entryway, in window boxes with dwarf evergreens or planted in a large container in the garden to serve as an attractive accent.

The best time to purchase ornamental kales and cabbages is in September. Look for plants with a short rosette-type stem. To avoid plants becoming root-bound, purchase the largest plants available. If temperatures are not cool when planting, the plants can become leggy and lose their color. Often planting before cool weather will subject the plants to cabbage loopers that bore holes in the plants.

Striving for color in the winter months gives gardeners the opportunity to do just that with ornamental kales and cabbages.

Carole McCray resides in Cape May, New Jersey and is an award-winning garden writer who has been writing a monthly garden column, The Potting Shed, for regional newspapers for nearly 20 years. Her articles have been published in The Christian Science Monitor Newspaper, Coastal Living Magazine, Cape May Magazine, Growise Garden Guide and Ideals Magazine. She won the Garden Writer’s Association Award for newspaper writing for The Christian Science Monitor Newspaper.

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