Election 2020: Garden City Voter Guide

GARDEN CITY, NY — Voters in Garden City will head to the polls Tuesday, Nov. 3, for the 2020 general election.

In addition to the presidential and congressional races, there are several key races at the state and local level. Voting will be different this year thanks to rules approved to expand early and mail-in voting in light of the coronavirus pandemic.

The deadline to register to vote is Oct. 24. You can check your voting status on the Secretary of State’s website, where you can also find your polling place.

There are several ways residents can vote:

Mail-In Voting

Vote-by-mail applications must be received by the Nassau County clerk by 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 27.

The ballot itself must either be personally delivered to the board of elections no later than the close of polls on Election Day, or postmarked by a governmental postal service not later than the day of the election and received no later than the 7th day after the election.

Early Voting

Early voting starts on Oct. 24 and runs until Nov. 1.

There are 15 early voting locations in Nassau County:

  • Elmont Public Library, 700 Hempstead Turnpike, Elmont

  • Floral Park Recreation Center, 124 Stewart St., Floral Park

  • Freeport Recreation Center, 130 E. Merrick Road, Freeport

  • Recreation Complex at St. Paul’s Field House, 295 Stewart Ave., Garden City

  • Brierley Park, 65 Dartmouth St., Hempstead

  • Levittown Hall, 201 Levittown Parkway, Hicksville

  • Lawrence Country Club, 101 Causeway, Lawrence

  • Oyster Bay Town Hall South, 977 Hicksville Road, Massapequa

  • North Merrick Public Library, 1691 Meadowbrook Road, North Merrick

  • Mid-Island Y JCC, 45 Manetto Hill Road, Plainview

  • Gayle Community Center, 53 Orchard St., Roslyn Heights

  • St. Markella Greek Orthodox Church, 1960 Jones Ave., Wantagh

  • West Hempstead Public Library, 500 Hempstead Ave., West Hempstead

  • Yes We Can Center-New Cassel, 141 Garden St., Westbury

  • Nassau County Board of Elections, 240 Old Country Road, Mineola

Any voter can vote at any of the early voting locations. The times the locations are open vary by date.

  • Oct. 24, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

  • Oct. 25, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

  • Oct. 26, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

  • Oct. 27, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

  • Oct. 28, 6 a.m. to 7 p.m.

  • Oct. 29, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

  • Oct. 30, 6 a.m. to 7 p.m.

  • Oct. 31, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

  • Nov. 1, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

All polling locations are open at all times, except for the Board of Elections office, which is open for voting until 8 p.m. on Oct. 26 and 28.

Voting on Election Day

Polls in New York are open 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Election Day.

You can find your assigned polling place by visiting the New York State Board of Elections website. For questions about voting in Garden City, contact the Nassau County Board of Elections at 516-571-VOTE (8683).

Key Races

The following are the key contested races that will be on the ballot for Garden City voters:

President/Vice President

Joe Biden/Kamala Harris

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Hell’s Kitchen Board Implores City To Reduce Hotel Shelters

HELL’S KITCHEN, NY — A Hell’s Kitchen community board renewed a call this week for the city to reduce the density of temporary homeless shelters in the neighborhood, saying increased crime and drug use associated with the facilities was causing a public health crisis in the area.

Members of Community Board 4 strained to distinguish the situation in Hell’s Kitchen from similar battles over the pandemic-era hotel shelters that have played out in other neighborhoods, saying they objected only to the concentration of shelters around West 36th and 37th streets and were open to relocating the shelters to elsewhere in the district.

“This is not NIMBYism. This is a common-sense request for a reduction,” board member Maria Ortiz said, using the acronym for “not in my backyard.”

The board voted unanimously Wednesday to send a letter to Mayor Bill de Blasio, Police Commissioner Dermot Shea and Department of Homeless Services Commissioner Steven Banks, noting that three hotels on the two streets have been converted into temporary shelters — part of the city’s effort to reduce crowding during the coronavirus pandemic.

A handful of residents who spoke at Wednesday’s meeting said that more than 800 shelter beds on 36th and 37th streets have caused a marked decline in their quality of life.

“We all legitimately fear for our safety and health every time we walk out the front door,” neighbor Brian Weber said.

Members of Manhattan Community Board 4 voted unanimously to send a letter to city officials objecting to the density of temporary shelters in the neighborhood. (Manhattan Community Board 4)

Resident Alexander Vitelli said he objected to the open drug use and perceived crime increase that arrived along with shelters, rather than the homeless residents themselves.

“I’m not going to sit here and say that it’s a homeless issue,” he said. “This is more than that — it is a mental health issue, it is a drug issue.”

‘We’re not looking to ship this out’

For months, Midtown and Hell’s Kitchen residents have complained about being host to a disproportionate number of temporary shelters. An August NY1 report found that the neighborhood had the most “homeless hotels” anywhere in the city.

That includes the SpringHill Suites and DoubleTree hotels on West 36th Street and the Hilton Garden Inn on 37th, according to the board.

In a draft of the board’s letter, which was shared with Patch, members also cite open intoxication, sexual harassment of women, aggressive panhandling, senior citizens being knocked down on the sidewalk and groups of maskless people congregated on sidewalks, among other concerns.

Besides reducing density, the board asks city officials to hold shelter providers accountable for poor management, provide homeless street outreach in the area and coordinate NYPD public safety enforcement.

Board chair Lowell Kern noted that the board had sent three previous letters to DHS about shelter density but that the agency had responded dismissively, saying the coronavirus crisis required emergency measures.

DHS did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The board

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Big Freedia’s weekly Garden Cookout in City Park is more about Freedia than food | Keith Spera

The focus of Big Freedia’s Garden Cookout is, in descending order of priority, Big Freedia, the garden and the actual cookout.

Since July, Freedia, the multiplatform Queen Diva of Bounce, has presided over a weekly cooking-themed webcast at the New Orleans Botanical Garden in City Park’s Kitchen in the Garden pavilion. The Friday night events are livestreamed on Freedia’s social media outlets.

The Garden Cookout expands on Freedia’s popular Sunday morning at-home cooking webcast and replaces some touring income lost to the coronavirus pandemic. Forty spectators seated at socially distanced tables each pay $90, or $120 to sit at one of the front tables. Tickets must be purchased through EventBrite in blocks of at least two, to fill tables with self-contained groups.

Freedia’s cottage industry, built from the ground up after years of toil on the New Orleans club circuit, encompasses recording, touring, an autobiography, branded bubbly and aprons, collaborations with the likes of Beyoncé and six seasons of a Fuse network reality show, alternately titled “Big Freedia: Queen of Bounce” and “Big Freedia Bounces Back,” from 2013 to 2017.

If the Oct. 2 Garden Cookout was typical, chatting and cutting up take precedence over actual cooking.



NO.freediacooks.liv.xxx.011.jpg

Fans “wiggle” to Big Freedia’s music during Big Freedia’s Garden Cookout at the New Orleans Botanical Garden in City Park, Friday, Oct. 2, 2020.




Early arrivals, wearing mandatory face masks, were escorted through the lovely Botanical Garden — it’s even more enchanting at night — to the brightly lit Kitchen in the Garden. Completed last fall, the open-air kitchen pavilion hosts culinary-themed educational and social events.

From 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., attendees patronized a cash bar while DJ Juane Jordan spun music. Freedia appeared in a sequined facemask, glittering purple pants and a custom chef’s coat bearing the image of his late, beloved mother, Vera, going quickly from table to table to pose for pictures.

And then it was show time. As cameras streamed the action on Facebook Live, Freedia, whose charisma translates well to the small screen, held court from behind the stove. A trio of friends, including longtime sidekick and dancer Tootie Tootz, provided running commentary from a corner of the countertop.



Big Freedia on her City Park cooking series and live-streaming from the kitchen

Big Freedia’s “Garden Cookout” series continues on Thursdays at City Park through August. The Queen Diva also live-streams the cooking demonstration on social media.

Freedia’s sister, Crystal, was in attendance with her young daughter. The Oct. 2 show celebrated the 60th birthday of Vera, who died of cancer in 2014, as well as the birthday of Devon, Freedia’s boyfriend.

(Freedia, who is fine with both masculine and feminine pronouns, recently wrote in the online magazine The Root, “I was born male and remain male — physically, hormonally and mentally. But I am a gay male. Some folks insist I have to be trans, but I don’t agree. I’m gender nonconforming, fluid, nonbinary. If I had known the ‘queen’ in Queen Diva would cause so much confusion, I might have called myself

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This ecologist was told she could keep her natural garden. Here’s why she’s fighting city hall anyway

An ecologist is challenging Toronto’s long grass and weed bylaw, even though the city exempted her from having to cut down her natural garden — which is home to tall shrubs and trees, as well as butterflies and chipmunks.

Nina-Marie Lister, an ecology and urban planning professor at Ryerson University, says she never asked for an exemption and she rejects it. Instead, she and her lawyer are arguing that the bylaw itself is unconstitutional and outdated, saying it goes against the city’s own pollinator protection and biodiversity strategies.

“[The current bylaw] really stands in the way of individual citizens on a small patch of yard trying to do the right thing at a time of biodiversity collapse and climate crisis,” said Lister, who was also a consultant on the city’s own biodiversity strategy.

The two are now drafting a replacement bylaw to present to the city this fall.

Lister and her family have been tending the garden at her home near Davenport Road and Christie Street for the past five years. It includes a front-yard meadow, a green roof and around 100 different species of plants, shrubs and trees, most of which are native to Ontario.

Nina-Marie Lister’s natural garden is home to about 100 different species of trees, plants and shrubs. (Lorraine Johnson)

“In the work that I do, it would be very odd for me not to have a garden that was full of life, rich in biodiversity and frankly, one that gives us enormous benefit as a community,” Lister said.

Lister, who is also and the director of Ryerson’s Ecological Design Lab, says the garden holds storm water, controls runoff and provides habitat for various birds and at-risk insects like monarch butterflies. It’s also been home to other creatures, including frogs, rabbits and chipmunks.

Plus, she says, it provides education and respite; passersby often stop and sit on logs that have been turned into makeshift seats, kids play in the flowers, and before the pandemic, school groups would come by.

‘The whole thing is ridiculous,’ lawyer says .

Lister says she hopes people get a sense of joy when they walk past the garden, but instead some have complained to the city.  A bylaw officer visited her home in August and said the garden violated the bylaw, which resulted in an order to mow it down.

The long grass and weed bylaw states grass, weeds and vegetation cannot be taller than 20 centimetres. A conviction can include forced mowing, at the landowner’s cost, and a fine of up to $5,000. That doesn’t include growth that’s part of a natural garden or planted to produce ground cover. Exemptions can be granted for natural gardens.

Some of Lister’s plants are between 90 and 120 centimetres. 

About 600 square metres of Nina-Marie Lister’s natural garden can be seen from the street. (John Lesavage/CBC)

Eventually, Lister was granted an exemption, but she says she didn’t apply for one and an inspection was never done to grant it.

Lister told the city

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Vandals damage City Park’s Storyland, Carousel Garden, write racial slurs on rides

Surveillance cameras captured images of the vandals in the act.

NEW ORLEANS — Vandals broke into City Park’s Storyland and Carousel Gardens, breaking windows, damaging the carousel, and writing racial slurs on the rides.

Photos from City Park show broken glass, graffiti and tails ripped from carousel horses. Officials say it also looks like someone stabbed the antique band organ and one of the carousel horses with a screwdriver.

The racially-charged graffiti includes the N-word and the phrase “Hitler Salute.”

Images of the two vandals were captured by security cameras set up after their first break-in. City Park officials say the names “Alex” and “Justin A” were written on items in the park and shoe prints were left on the carousel doors where they were kicked in.

City Park’s Storyland received a big renovation in 2019, adding new exhibits. The carousel is more than a century old and is on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior.

“This hurts my heart. The Carousel and Storyland are such traditional iconic parts of the Park. The Carousel is over 100 years old. To have them survive Katrina only to then be disrespected in this way is a true travesty. The people of New Orleans love City Park and we’re so grateful to them. It’s sad to see a few people destroy so much,” says Bob Becker, City Park CEO.

City Park is offering a $1,000 reward for information that leads to the arrest and conviction of the perpetrators. Anyone with information is encouraged to contact City Park Chief Operations Officer, Rob DeViney at 504-419-2832.

RELATED: City Park taking a major hit to finances due to COVID restrictions

RELATED: Celebration in the Oaks goes drive-thru due to COVID-19

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‘Vegetable garden city’ eyed in Tondo


‘Vegetable garden city’ eyed in Tondo

Rhodina Villanueva (The Philippine Star) – October 6, 2020 – 12:00am

MANILA, Philippines — The Department of Agrarian Reform (DAR) is set to convert a one-and-a-half-hectare idle lot in Tondo, Manila into a “vegetable garden city” for the benefit of residents in surrounding villages.

DAR Secretary John Castriciones said the lot is located at St. John Bosco Parish Church and its parish priest, Fr. Gaudencio Carandang, has given his approval for the project.

“The DAR will provide the farm inputs – seeds, seedling trays, garden tools, fertilizer and pesticide,” Castriciones said, adding that barangay officials have volunteered to tend the garden.

He added that the harvested vegetables would be distributed among the participating barangays’ residents.

Castriciones said he raised the idea after the idle lot caught his eye as he distributed food packs to poor families in Tondo.

The food packs consisted of cabbage and round radish sold at a bargain by a farmers’ group in Nueva Vizcaya, whose harvest was unsold and rotting.

“Instead of going to waste, we might as well, make use of these vegetable surplus to feed the hungry,” Castriciones said during the food distribution program.

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Freeport Mayor’s View: City seeks home improvements grant – News – Rockford Register Star

As we rapidly approach the end of the construction season, the City is quickly working to wrap up a variety of infrastructure projects. We had a busy year executing infrastructure projects and approving additional work that will be completed over the next year and a half.

In the past few months alone, the City completed the $3 million Float Avenue infrastructure project, repaved Sunset Drive, Hurd Street, Boggess Street, as well as portions of Ottawa Avenue and Winneshiek Street. Anyone who has driven over Locust Avenue between Lincoln Boulevard and Pleasant Street will appreciate the much-needed repairs that were conducted in the past week. We are also in the middle of milling the street and overlaying Highland Drive in its entirety and are planning on road repair on portions of South Demeter Drive before the weather, and leaf pickup season, prohibits us from further infrastructure improvement projects.

In addition to these water and sewer projects, the City also began utilizing our $2 million grant to replace lead service lines in the City. While all these projects can be an inconvenience to drivers attempting to navigate the construction zones, we appreciate the patience of the residents as this work is critical for upgrading our City’s infrastructure and improving our quality of life.

If you’ve driven along Burchard Avenue, you’ve no doubt noticed the long-term activity around the water tower, including a large drill. We are in the middle of drilling for our new water well #11. Once completed, this new well will allow us to draw water from the Mount Simon aquifer, which our testing has shown to have even higher quality water than provided by our other wells. Next year you’ll see construction on the water treatment plant that will be built adjacent to the well. Once operational, the well will be capable of producing 2,200 gallons of water per minute. This new treatment plant will replace our current Brick Street plant, which has been in service since 1882. We continue to seek supplemental sources of funding, such as grants, for this and all our infrastructure projects.

The City also implemented plans to aggressively continue infrastructure work next year. In addition to the work discussed above, the Council recently approved the Phase 2 Water Main and Looping project which will begin immediately and go through the next year and a half. This $2 million project, which is part of our longer-term Capital Improvement Plan, includes water main replacement along portions of the streets of Cleveland, Jefferson, Monroe, Santa Fe, Meadows, Sylvan and South. Approximately 20%, or $400,000, of this project will be forgiven by the IEPA upon completion, allowing us to stretch our capital improvement funds further. We were also pleased to award the lowest bid to a local bidder, providing an additional benefit to our local economy.

The City continues to pursue all sources of funding to stretch our local dollars and recently applied for two Community Development Block Grants along the Adams Avenue Corridor. If awarded, one grant

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Walk to restaurants, shops from this $1.7M Birmingham city house

This is a high-end city house — a house that packs luxury finishes and open space onto its narrow 43-foot lot.  

Walk to restaurants, shops from this $1.7M Birmingham city house

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Side to side, this house is slid onto its land like a hand into a glove — snugly. But the lot is 186 feet deep, and both front and back have been made into pleasing outdoor space. 

It has neighborly, sheltered front porch, deep enough for furniture, where the owners like to sit in the evening and watch the cars and dog walkers. It has a compact backyard set up for entertaining with stone paving, outdoor furniture and a handsome fireplace. 



a small clock tower in front of a house: A walkable distance into Birmingham, this "city house" fits 3,900 square feet, plus a finished lower level, onto a lot just 43 feet wide. Like its lot, the house is narrow and deep.


© Nev Muftari
A walkable distance into Birmingham, this “city house” fits 3,900 square feet, plus a finished lower level, onto a lot just 43 feet wide. Like its lot, the house is narrow and deep.

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Most significant for a city house, it has a half-mile walk to the attractions of downtown Birmingham.  “There’s a ton of restaurants, shops, the events in Shain Park,”  the owner said. “You can walk to town.” 

That was a deliberate choice for these owners, who came to the area about two years ago. The kids were grown, and they wanted a site with some bustle. “We wanted city-type living,” the owner said. “We’d done that house in the suburbs with a big yard.” 

On the narrow, deep lot the house also is deep. It packs 3,900 square feet into its two main floors, with rooms lined behind each other and open space between. Its finished daylight lower level adds another 1,800. 

More from Michigan House Envy:

$1M Victorian home in Canfield Historic District is one of a few to reach open market

Grosse Pointe Shores estate of late Ralph Wilson Jr. listed at $9.5M for a reason

The biggest open space on the main floor is where the large kitchen, 18 by 18 feet, flows into the large family room, 17 by 18. At the other end of the kitchen, a butler’s pantry opens into the dining room. You can see through this four-room stretch from one end to the other. 

This family room is the last room at the back of the house, and French doors open out to the paved back yard. Two sides of the room are windows.  

At the front of the house a distinctive office has the view out the front window, which has an inset of beveled, leaded glass.  

The room is painted dark chocolate brown, almost black, over lavish built-ins and woodwork. The crown molding starts at the top of the door and goes the rest of the way up the wall, then out across the ceiling till it reaches a central step-up.  



a living room filled with furniture and a large window: The lavish office is lined with layer after layer of crown molding and more trim, all painted very dark. It has a large stone fireplace and a view of the front street. Its window is topped with diamond-pattern beveled glass.


© Nev Muftari
The lavish office is lined with layer after layer of crown molding and more trim, all painted

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Garden City country club with name tied to slavery unveils new name

The Plantation Country Club in Garden City has cast aside its only link to slavery and is now known as The River Club.

“Looking to the future of this great club and what it means to members and the community, the element we kept coming back to was the river,” Will Gustafson, CEO of owner Glass Creek LLC, said in a news release Thursday. “The Boise River is the lifeblood for this community. It was obvious that our club’s future had to pay respect to the river.”

The club announced in June, amid nationwide protests of police violence against Black people, that it was seeking a new name. In the U.S., the word plantation is associated with large farms built in the past on the backs of slave labor.

In August, the Cathedral of the Rockies in Boise removed a stained glass window installed in 1960 that contained the image of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. Church documents showed the window, featuring Lee standing with Presidents Abraham Lincoln and George Washington, was meant as an “inclusive nod to Southerners who have settled in Boise.”

Glass Creek, which bought the country club in 2018, planned to unveil a new name after a redesign of the course and other improvements were completed in a few years. However, Gustafson said the events of 2020 brought an increased focus on ensuring the club matched modern-day values.

“We felt from the very beginning that ‘Plantation Country Club’ did not reflect the vision we had for the club’s future: a fresh, modern, inclusive, and welcoming club for all members of the community,” he said. “This year brought a sharp focus on just how imperative it was for our club to not be attached to that dark piece of America’s history, and we knew we couldn’t wait any longer.”

The course, the oldest in Southern Idaho, opened July 18, 1917 as the Boise Country Club. Fourteen years later, the name was changed to the Plantation Country Club.

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Garden City country club casts aside Plantation name

The Plantation Country Club in Garden City has cast aside its only link to slavery and is now known as The River Club.

“Looking to the future of this great club and what it means to members and the community, the element we kept coming back to was the river,” Will Gustafson, CEO of owner Glass Creek LLC, said in a news release Thursday. “The Boise River is the lifeblood for this community. It was obvious that our club’s future had to pay respect to the river.”

The club announced in June, amid nationwide protests of police violence against Black people, that it was seeking a new name. In the U.S., the word plantation is associated with large farms built in the past on the backs of slave labor.

In August, the Cathedral of the Rockies in Boise removed a stained glass window installed in 1960 that contained the image of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. Church documents showed the window, featuring Lee standing with Presidents Abraham Lincoln and George Washington, was meant as an “inclusive nod to Southerners who have settled in Boise.”

Glass Creek, which bought the country club in 2018, planned to unveil a new name after a redesign of the course and other improvements were completed in a few years. However, Gustafson said the events of 2020 brought an increased focus on ensuring the club matched modern-day values.

2020-RiverClub-LogoOptions-v6 Final_Page_1.jpg
Provided by The River Club

“We felt from the very beginning that ‘Plantation Country Club’ did not reflect the vision we had for the club’s future: a fresh, modern, inclusive, and welcoming club for all members of the community,” he said. “This year brought a sharp focus on just how imperative it was for our club to not be attached to that dark piece of America’s history, and we knew we couldn’t wait any longer.”

The course, the oldest in Southern Idaho, opened July 18, 1917 as the Boise Country Club. Fourteen years later, the name was changed to the Plantation Country Club.

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Reporter John Sowell has worked for the Statesman since 2013. He covers business and growth issues. He grew up in Emmett and graduated from the University of Oregon.If you like seeing stories like this, please consider supporting our work with a digital subscription to the Idaho Statesman.

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