Lucky Bird Los Angeles Partners With Epic Kitchens to Open First Ghost Kitchen in Chicago on October 1st

CHICAGO, Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Lucky Bird, best known for its juicy Fried Chicken Buckets and sandwiches, has partnered with Epic Kitchens to open the brand’s first ghost kitchen in Chicago on September 21. The popular chef-driven restaurant located in Los Angeles’s historic Grand Central Station will offer a diverse menu of signature fried chicken dishes, delicious sides, and beverages for locals to order through EpicKitchens.com and via third-party delivery partners including DoorDash, Uber Eats, Grubhub, Caviar, and Postmates. 

Originally founded in Downtown Los Angeles in August 2018 by Chef Chris Dane, the philosophy of Lucky Bird is good fried chicken can solve anything. Making everything from scratch, from buttermilk biscuits to homemade hot sauce, Lucky Bird does their very best to source ingredients locally to ensure the freshest and highest quality product, but most of all they believe there are not many things a bucket of chicken can’t solve.

“We couldn’t be happier to be opening in Chicago. Being able to share fried chicken with people from all over was always one of the main driving factors in opening Lucky Bird, and having our first location outside of Los Angeles be Chicago makes total sense because Chicago is a food Mecca for many with countless great restaurants, so we hope the people of Chicago will open their arms to one more.” said Chef, Chris Dane.

The Chicago incarnation of Lucky Bird will be open for lunch and dinner. Signature dishes on the menu include Fried Chicken Buckets with a mix of white & dark meat; Popcorn Chicken served with a smoked paprika dipping sauce; and Fried Sandwiches served on a   Milk bun with a chicken thigh, homemade pickles, smoked paprika aioli & butter lettuce. Sides include Jojo’s pressured fried potato wedges; Homemade Biscuits served with whipped honey butter; Potato Salad served with Yukon Gold potatoes dressed with garlic herb aioli; Macaroni Salad; Slaw; Pickled Vegetables; and Pickles.

Lucky Bird Chicago

Lucky Bird Chicago will be open seven days a week from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Stay up to date with specials and mouth-watering photos by liking and following on Instagram and Facebook at @luckybirdchicago and online through https://www.luckybirdla.com/.

About Lucky Bird:

Lucky Bird is owned and operated by head chef, Chris Dane and his wife, Christine. At Lucky Bird, we pride ourselves on making everything from scratch, from our fermented hot sauce to our buttermilk biscuits. We source fresh and never frozen ABF chickens and we cut and portion these birds ourselves making sure the quality is up to our standards. We brine our chicken in a citrus brine, use Wondra flour, and fry in pressure cookers. The citrus brine gives a nice refreshing note to the often heavy taste of fried chicken, and we finish the chicken with fresh lemon zest and Maldon sea salt to fortify that lemon flavor.  Wondra is an instant flour and doesn’t absorb oil like regular flour, so it becomes

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Nathan Allen leaves House Theatre of Chicago after nearly 20 years as leader

Nathan Allen, the founding artistic director of the House Theatre of Chicago and its principal public face and creative force for the last almost 20 years, is leaving his post.

“I am not going to stop making art,” Allen said, noting that money factored into his decision. “But I have two school-age kids and my wife is working a lot of overtime.”

As with many other theater companies, the pandemic has had an acute impact on House, a company founded by a group of college friends in 2000 and known for its innovative original theater, its interest in popular culture and its longstanding determination to attract millennials and Gen-Xers who do not typically attend theater. Allen, known for his exuberant curtain speeches (“let’s make some noise”) and his warm-centered personality, was a big part of that appeal, as was his work.

Unlike most non-profit theaters, House made an impressive 70% of its roughly $2.2 million annual budget at its own box office, and that box office has been closed since March.

“Our way has always been to sell a hell of a lot of tickets,” Allen, 42, said. “And our way doesn’t work anymore. We’ve settled into a sustainable position where we can hold on for a whole year. But what the House deserves is someone to really rebuild a company. I know what that is, but it’s not me. That was a commitment I had in my 20s, but I don’t have it now. I feel like I already helped build it, and I honestly would be too angry to have to do it all again.”

House has been forced to furlough or lay off most of its staffers in recent weeks. Its two remaining current employees, Allen and managing director Erik Schroeder, have been reduced to part time.

Allen was responsible for some huge creative and financial successes, including the writing and directing of “Death and Harry Houdini,” which toured nationally; the co-authorship and direction of “The Sparrow,” a wrenching piece about an unusual young girl in a small Illinois town; the direction of “Verboten,” a recent hit musical featuring punk music by Jason Narducy; and, perhaps most notably of all, the direction of “The Terrible Tragedy of Peter Pan,” the dazzlingly creative and emotionally intense piece that first made House a young Chicago theater to watch.

“Nate has built a community of artists,” Schroeder said. “For so many people in Chicago, House was their first theater experience. His focus was always on the audience. He helped bring some super-fun and very unusual stories to the stage. And a large part of the legacy that Nate leaves is an audience of 30- and 40-somethings who now will be theatergoers for rest of their lives.”

Schroeder also said that House intends to carry on into the future and look for a successor. Allen says he is committed to helping the company make that transition. He also said that he had “seen the sea change socially” and concluded

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DeForest Buckner dominates Chicago Bears interior OL

The Chicago Bears interior offensive line was devastated by DeFoest Buckner

It is unfortunate when your worst fears come true. Previewing the Chicago Bears game against the Indianapolis Colts, it was almost impossible to get the image of DeForest Buckner blowing things up out of my head. Grady Jarrett presented the Chicago Bears their first true test of the season and the interior struggled.

It was easily brushed off by the idea that the Chicago Bears came back and won. However, it lingered that a fast, physical, and dominant defensive tackle made life tough for James Daniels and Germain Ifedi.

Jarrett is excellent, and this is no disrespect to him, but Buckner is a different beast. It starts physically, where he has the size of only a player such as Calais Campbell. However, according to PFF, no defensive lineman has been as dominant as Buckner with over 100 snaps played this season.

We noted that Buckner moved around to each side, and he did not spare James Daniels or Germain Ifedi from having their hands full.

Look at the size as he swims over James Daniels, who looks tiny in the presence of Buckner.

This play is even more impressive. We have noted that Germain Ifedi has excelled in the Chicago Bears new scheme due to his athleticism. The Bears have got him moving laterally, and he has done well in space.

The Bears tried to get Ifedi moving Buckner laterally and it went poorly. Buckner pushes Ifedi off, regains composure to read the play, and then shoves Ifedi aside to make the play.

Making this play while running laterally and making it as he was backing up away from the football is impressive.

Next: Cody Whitehair leads offensive woes

According to PFF Buckner finished with five total pressures and three quarterback hits. The rest of the offensive line had their hands full, and overall, they just could not handle Buckner. That trade is starting to look like it is working out for the Indianapolis Colts.

Source Article

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Chicago cannot lose the Palmer House, now boarded up and in deep financial trouble

The great Chicago Tribune critic Claudia Cassidy lived at the Drake Hotel. Touring Broadway celebrities would dine with Sun-Times columnist Irv Kupcinet at the Pump Room at the Ambassador East. And at the Palmer House’s famed Empire Room, a 250-seat cabaret venue with an elegance like no other, Phyllis Diller told jokes and early-career stars like Liberace, Maurice Chevalier, Carol Channing and Tony Bennett were launched.



a sign on the side of a building: Owner of the Palmer House Hilton has been sued for $338 million in missed loan payments, in the largest Chicago foreclosure case to emerge from the coronavirus pandemic, Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2020.


© E. Jason Wambsgans / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Owner of the Palmer House Hilton has been sued for $338 million in missed loan payments, in the largest Chicago foreclosure case to emerge from the coronavirus pandemic, Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2020.



a close up of a train station: The entrance of the Palmer House Hilton stands empty on Monroe Street on Sept. 8.


© E. Jason Wambsgans / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
The entrance of the Palmer House Hilton stands empty on Monroe Street on Sept. 8.

All of that is to say that Chicago’s historic hotels are joined at the hip with our historic and spectacular tradition of live entertainment.

All of that is to say further that, for this writer, seeing boards over the entrance to the Palmer House Hotel, officially the Palmer House Hilton, is every bit as painful as seeing them over the Art Institute of Chicago, or the Picasso statue or Buckingham Fountain.

To lose this hotel would be a loss of unfathomable proportions. And there is a real danger of the unthinkable happening.

As the Tribune’s Ryan Ori reported Aug. 31, the owner of the Palmer House, Thor Equities, has been hit with a foreclosure suit alleging unpaid mortgage payments totaling nearly $338 million. Worse, the hotel is now, in real estate parlance, underwater, being as its current valuation is only $305 million, down from $560 million as recently as 2018.

For a stunning example of how much Chicago’s Loop is losing to the absence of tourists and conventioneers, just consider the size and speed of that drop in valuation.

It’s breathtaking.

That word that could also be used to describe the lobby of the Palmer House, a grand riot of columns, murals, candelabras and a sense of Saturday night urban grandeur that once was the headquarters for the election campaign of Grover Cleveland and, over the years, has hosted enough weddings and conventions to keep half the Loop in business.

The Palmer House long employed a resident historian, Ken Price, who led hundreds of tours to the backstage areas of the Empire Room, where a lucky guests could see stagebills and headshots of the greats who performed there, all lovingly preserved. Price’s tour was about the most fun I ever had in the Loop. And lots of out-of-towners, especially show-business types, felt the same way.

Michael Riedel, the New York radio personality and longtime Broadway columnist, told me this week of his excitement of staying in “the biggest suite I had ever seen” while covering an out-of-town tryout. And, of course, he took Price’s tour. Chris Baum, a longtime concierge at the Langham Chicago Hotel, told me he sent many a guest to experience the history of the Empire Room.

Over

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