Longtime Commander’s Palace chef departs, and for first time a woman leads the kitchen | Where NOLA Eats

For the first time in almost two decades, Commander’s Palace has a new chef. For the first time in the famous restaurant’s long history that chef is a woman.

Tory McPhail, executive chef since 2002, has resigned and is moving to Montana, where he will work with a local restaurant group in the mountain town of Bozeman.



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Chef Meg Bickford of Commander’s Palace restaurant in New Orleans, Oct. 2020.




His successor at Commander’s Palace is Meg Bickford, who was previously executive sous chef.

Bickford, 34, has risen through the ranks at Commander’s Palace and is now the first woman to lead the landmark restaurant’s kitchen.

To Bickford, that speaks to a culture of mentoring at Commander’s Palace and to its family leadership. The restaurant is run today by Ti Martin and Lally Brennan, cousins who grew up in the restaurant.

“I’ve had a lot of opportunities to grow here, and a lot of people who invested the time and effort and who believed in me,” Bickford said. “That’s what we do here, and that’s why I’m in this position today.”

Passing the torch

Bickford’s new position is among the most prominent in the New Orleans culinary world, with a role that goes beyond directing its sprawling kitchen.



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Commander’s Palace was voted tops in four categories, including Best new Orleans Restaurant.




Commander’s Palace is a byword for New Orleans fine dining and among the best-known restaurants in the region. Though its history goes back to 1893, it became an emblem of modern New Orleans cuisine in the 1970s after the Brennan family acquired the vintage restaurant. It pioneered haute Creole cuisine, which reshaped the national reputation of New Orleans food from a bulwark of tradition to a hotbed of innovation.



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Commander’s Palace chef Paul Prudhomme instructs apprentices in the restaurant’s kitchen. Prudhomme, then-executive chef at Commander’s Palace Restaurant, had eight apprentices working under him.




Commander’s Palace has produced some of the world’s most famous chefs, namely Paul Prudhomme and his immediate successor, Emeril Lagasse. At the same time, the restaurant has held a reputation as the “finishing school” for New Orleans culinary talent, for the generations of hospitality pros who have come through its doors.



Matriarch and mentor: How Ella Brennan’s belief in mentoring profoundly impacted culinary life of New Orleans

Ella Brennan has an expression she uses to describe her favorite chefs, especially those she worked with closely at Commander’s Palace.

That role is foremost in Bickford’s mind as she steps into the kitchen’s highest position. She acknowledges the issues of equality and inclusion now running through American discourse, and she’s driven by the potential she sees to do more.

“We need to recognize our responsibilities to our people, in our community and in our workplace,” Bickford said.

“I love that our leaders have stepped up. Our business has to reflect our community. Diversity is incredibly important to me and to this business. I also think we need to do a better job than what we’re doing, and

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Executive Chef Darren Pettigrew of ALFIE’S BAR & KITCHEN in Hell’s Kitchen, NYC

Chef Spotlight: Executive Chef Darren Pettigrew of ALFIE'S BAR & KITCHEN in Hell's Kitchen, NYC

Dublin-born chef Darren Pettigrew was trained in London at the Da Vere Grand Connaught Rooms and grew up working in the kitchens of New York. Throughout his career he has donned the stove at countless established restaurants in New York honing his skills in the kitchen and continually pushing the envelope with more creative takes on everyday dishes. He previously owned seafood restaurant Stella Maris at the South Street Seaport for five years. He also spent a number of years working with famed restaurateurs Peter and Harry Poulakakos at their Financial District properties. Now he serves as the Executive Chef for the SRP NYC restaurant group, developing innovative menus for their various concepts.

Alfie’s Bar & Kitchen, the Hell’s Kitchen neighborhood favorite that just celebrated its eight-year anniversary, spotlights a brand-new and refreshed New American Gastro Pub menu from new Executive Chef Darren Pettigrew. The restaurant is owned by seasoned restaurateur, Sean Hayden, whose career spans 25 years and serves as a partner of the SRP NYC restaurant group that operates Valerie, Dalton’s, and Jasper’s Tap House & Kitchen. Hayden saw a need to create a true restaurant experience for the community and was the first to bring a more sophisticated American kitchen to the Hell’s Kitchen neighborhood. Now Chef Pettigrew will be providing Alfie’s beloved customers with an inspired dining experience complete with elevated New American dishes, spotlighting locally sourced organic ingredients.

Broadwayworld.com had the pleasure on interviewing Chef Pettigrew about his career and Alfie’s Bar & Kitchen for our “Chef Spotlight.”

What was your earliest interest in cooking?

My earliest interest in cooking was making apple pies as a kid with my mother. Playing with dough made with lard and helping to peel Irish crab apples. The native crab apple grows wildly amongst the wild hedge rows and woodlands of Ireland. Probably the most bitter fruit I’ve ever tasted but makes for a great pie!

Who were some of your career mentors?

I’ve been very fortunate to have had many real mentors and talented people to help guide me throughout my career. Starting with Chef Cormac Healy at the National Yacht Club of Ireland. Chef Eric Lind; Chef Ebhenhart Mullers my left hand man, formerly of Lutece. Most recently, Master Chef Rich Rosendale.

What culinary styles have influenced your career?

I’m classically trained, so certainly French, Italian and Spanish, but a recent trip to Japan has turned the way I think about food on its head. Japanese food is very simplistic and pure in essence, but extraordinarily difficult to execute. I trained with a great group of Japanese chefs in rural Japan at the dream lab. Their dedication, technique and precision was something to be admired.

What do you consider the most distinguishing feature of your work as a chef?

Reforming totally new teams, learning to be more resilient and understanding how to constantly adapt to a forever changing landscape. In addition to learn how to handle all the other curve balls being thrown at us week in

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Saturday Kitchen chef James Martin has quit social media – here’s what happened

Monday, 5th October 2020, 1:30 pm

Updated Monday, 5th October 2020, 1:38 pm
The virtual cooking masterclass suffered from a host of technical difficulties (Photo: Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images)

Saturday Kitchen chef James Martin has quit social media after receiving backlash for his virtual cookalong event that was branded a “disaster” by attendees.

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The This Morning chef says that he has been the target of “vile abuse” by those angry that they had experienced technical issues during the sold-out cooking masterclass.

What happened?

Martin held a virtual cookery class on Saturday 3 October, which invited fans and foodies to create a three course meal alongside Martin during the 90-minute experience.

The menu was set to consist of a start of halloumi with chilli jam, a main course of chicken saute with vinegar and pilaf rice, and a dessert of a raspberry tart.

Tickets for the event had launched at 10am on Friday 11 September, and cost cookery fans £35 for the virtual masterclass – not including the individual cost for ingredients.

However, many attendees were left frustrated after technical issues left their screens frozen or unable to connect to the event.

Some of those who attended the event called it “a chaotic shambles” and a “complete disaster”, with many commenting that Martin moved through the cooking instructions too quickly.

Others questioned if the event itself was even live, stating that it was “clearly pre-recorded”.

What has James Martin said?

Taking to Twitter, the chef explained that he would be taking a break from social media following the online abuse he received after the show.

In a thread of tweets, Martin wrote: “Having seen some of the comments posted online regarding last night’s cook along and the anger towards me given the technical issues that the production team were having, I would like to apologise again for this and I will be chasing up with Live Nation, the production company IT team and all the people they hired, to find out the problem.

“Having said that, this is a small comfort to some of you online who are quite rightly angry at me. I promise I will be speaking to them tomorrow, I wasn’t involved in the IT side of things and know little about it, but will get all the issues raised and sorted as much as I possibly can immediately.

“It’s unfortunate they didn’t use my team that makes the Saturday show to do this but, as you can imagine, it was all out of my hands.

“To the rest of you who had a good night, thank you, but due to the large amount of vile comments posted directly towards me, this will be my last post as I will be taking a break from posting personally and all social media for the foreseeable future.”

Online support

Following his announcement that he would be departing from social media, fans of the Saturday Kitchen

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‘As a chef I feel lost without my kitchen’

The Michelin-starred chef and restaurateur Marcus Wareing considered quitting the kitchen for a role in farming, such were his concerns during lockdown for the future of his business.

‘Over the last six months I’ve thought about a different career,’ he admits in the latest episode of the podcast Biting Talk, in which he talks candidly of his fears for the restaurant industry.

‘During lockdown I watched as my bank account went down and down, and I’ve had to ask myself how much energy do I want to put into [my business], should I look at new things or take an early retirement?’

Wareing, who owns two London restaurants, Marcus at The Berkeley Hotel in Knightsbridge and The Gilbert Scott at St Pancras, says he experienced ‘some dark days,’ adding that ‘life is full of lots of challenges. I’ve had some great highs and some really weird lows and some tough times. As a chef I feel lost without my kitchen.’

His ‘burning desire’ was ‘to get back in my chef’s jacket. I’m tired of the doom and gloom. We’ve come together as an industry, we’ve got choppy roads ahead but we have to manage that and welcome our guests with smiles and a glass of champagne.’

Wareing re-opened his restaurant Marcus this week after a closure of six months but has warned that ‘the gamechanger will be another lockdown. It would be catastrophic for the industry [and] restaurants would close like dominoes.’

Listen to the full interview with Marcus Wareing on the latest edition of Biting Talk presented by William Sitwell by clicking on the audio player above. This week’s guests include the UK Hospitality spokesperson and government lobbyist Kate Nicholls who reveals ‘the iron fist’ in her velvet glove, East London baker Francesca Strange of The Proof, up-and-coming chef Olivia Burt, and Biting Talk’s mixologist Farhad Heydari.

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Legendary Charlie Trotter’s sous chef Reggie Watkins, ‘backbone’ of kitchen for 25 years, dies at 64

For 25 years, Reginald Watkins was the backbone of one of the most famous kitchens in the world, the acclaimed Charlie Trotter’s in Lincoln Park. While a stunning roster of chefs passed through the restaurant throughout the years, Watkins remained a constant, working as the primary sous chef — and kitchen confidante for owner Charlie Trotter — until he left the restaurant in 2011, a year before it closed for good.



Charlie Trotter, Margalita Chakhnashvili posing for the camera: Chef Reginald Watkins, right, holds a sign honoring his former boss Charlie Trotter, center, during a ceremony naming a portion of Armitage Avenue as Honorary Charlie Trotter Way in August 2012.


© Chris Walker, Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Chef Reginald Watkins, right, holds a sign honoring his former boss Charlie Trotter, center, during a ceremony naming a portion of Armitage Avenue as Honorary Charlie Trotter Way in August 2012.

On Monday night, Watkins died at age 64, of unknown causes during a visit to the emergency room in his home city of Chicago, after having spent the last several years working and living in Louisiana.

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Following news of his death, many former co-workers from Trotter’s and beyond shared heartfelt memories and regards on social media about “Chef Reggie,” a man they remembered as being tough but gentle — and a necessary guide to help young chefs survive what was a notoriously demanding kitchen environment.

“He was a legend in his own right,” said his daughter, Lerita Watkins.

“He was a real icon at that restaurant,” echoed chef David LeFevre, who worked two stints at Trotter’s kitchen between 1995 and 2004.

The Los Angleles-based LeFevre was among a long list of former co-workers who shared tributes to Watkins earlier this week, along with Grant Achatz, Bill Kim, Giuseppe Tentori, Sari Zernich-Worsham and plenty more.

“My dad was in love with cooking, working, being amongst his peers who also shared his love with being a chef,” Lerita Watkins said. “He kept in touch with so many of those people that he trained. He did.”

Born and raised near 35th Street and King Drive, Reggie Watkins was raised by his mother and grandmother and lived in the city for almost his entire life. In 1987, he responded to a newspaper classified ad seeking kitchen help, which led to his meeting Charlie Trotter, who was looking to open a restaurant. The ad had published for the first time on that date, Trotter’s son Dylan said, and Watkins was the first person to respond.

“When he first met my dad, he was just going to lie and be like, ‘Oh, yeah, I’ve cooked before,’” Dylan Trotter said Watkins recently shared with him. “But then when he saw my dad and saw his face, he was like, ‘I knew I couldn’t lie to this guy. I had to tell him the truth.’ They just had the connection right off the bat.”

The rest is actual history. Watkins was famously hired as the first-ever employee at Trotter’s, running the kitchen from its first day until his last day in 2011. He and Charlie Trotter grew to be close friends, almost like brothers: “We always envisioned those two getting old together,” LeFevre said. (The restaurant closed in

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50 Kitchen Gadgets Under $50 To Make You Feel Like A Professional Chef

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They say a chef is only as good as the tools in their kitchen, and as someone who has recently developed a love of cooking, I can confirm this is 100% true. The right equipment can make or break your kitchen experience, but you don’t need to splurge to have everything you need. Some of the best kitchen gadgets are under $50, so you can stock up on a bunch and live out your chef fantasies on a budget.

Trust me, making a delicious meal is easy as long as you have the right tools to assist you. Need to do a good bit of chopping? Having the right knife and steady cutting board makes it so much easier. Not sure if your chicken is cooked through? A meat thermometer will quickly solve that problem. Plus, there are tons of fun kitchen gadgets that make cooking even more enjoyable. Unexpected, handy tools like a bread maker, a rice cooker and an air fryer will open up so many doors, allowing you to experiment even more in the kitchen. Think homemade sushi, healthy fried fish tacos, rye bread for sandwiches and so much more—all you need is enough storage space for your new tools!

Of course, gadgets and accessories are fun to play with, and can make your cooking experience more pleasant, but to really whip up a good meal, you also need to make sure your pots and pans are up to speed. You can easily get a perfect sear on a buttered scallop if you’re using a quality nonstick pan, and cast iron pans are perfect for seasoned steaks and chickens. Even if you’re looking to make something as simple as a smoothie, having the right blender will make the process much more seamless. See what I mean when I say it’s all about the tools you’ve got at the ready?

If you need to stock up, rest assured—everything you need is on this list. Read on to shop some of the best kitchen gadgets under $50 on the market, and step up your meal prep game for life.

Our mission at STYLECASTER is to bring style to the people, and we only feature products we think you’ll love as much as we do. HSN is a STYLECASTER sponsor, however, all products in this article were independently selected by our editors. Please note that if you purchase something by clicking on a link within this story, we may receive a small commission of the sale.

1. Belgian Waffle Maker

STYLECASTER | 50 under 50 kitchen gadgets | waffle maker

Courtesy of HSN.

Fact: Your kitchen isn’t complete without a waffle maker. Make delicious homemade waffles every weekend with this handy tool that comes with different temperature settings to make your waffle as crispy or as fluffy as you’d like.

2. Easy Strainer

STYLECASTER | 50 under 50 kitchen gadgets | pot strainer

Courtesy of Kitchen Gizmo.

Ditch your old-fashioned colander for this easy to use pot strainer, complete with grips on each side for no-fuss handling. Just place it over your pot, tilt and

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Kitchen appliances that will perfectly assist your chef dreams!

The designs here aren’t your average microwave, stoves, or blenders. Technology has picked up pace – its no longer weird to ‘talk’ to your microwave or your fridge anymore. Kitchen appliances have followed the tech wave and if you’re new to the kitchen or an old professional, everyone’s kitchen can benefit from an upgrade with these awesome product designs. While quarantine has surely upgraded your cooking skills, its time to make your kitchen applications the perfect sous chef to your cooking challenges! Mini pancakes, anyone?

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Ordine by Adriano Design is an innovative cooking solution designed for the modern user. Optimized for small spaces, the design eliminates the need for a bulky traditional stove, clearing the way for more cabinet and counter space. The design features two hob units that are mounted on a central power hub on the wall. Elevated neatly out of the way, the user must simply grab one or both hobs off the wall and set the desired temperature to activate.

This 3-in-1 dishwasher design by Fotile hides your dishwasher and dryer elegantly by welding it to your stainless steel sink. The dishwasher has a larget fillet that facilitates accelerated rotation of water flow to improve the efficiency of wash cycles. Another great perk of it being fitted in your sink is that it reduces the hassle of cleaning inside the appliance. It also has a flat embedded ‘lid’ which makes it easy for you to keep your countertop clean while not sacrificing surface space. Apart from killing 99.99% of bacteria from the dishes, it also doubles up as a fruit and vegetable purifier. Using ultrasonic technology and a turbulent spray, it removes 90% of pesticide residue from your produce. This dishwasher claims to have no blind spots – 360-degree cleaning and drying!

Designed to be your go-to for any cooking measurements, the Kitchen Cube integrates all measuring vessels into its singular, yellow, cube-shaped body. With over 19+ measuring units designed into its 6-sided shape, the Kitchen Cube can be used to measure anything from teaspoons and tablespoons to even cups, working with both wet and dry ingredients alike. The cube comes with both metric and US measuring units molded into its unique design, allowing you to even measure out your ingredients in milliliters if the recipe calls for it.

Since professional coffee machines have a different product for each part of the process, Rebuild:ratio was designed as an espresso machine that would streamline the process of making coffee and while not taking away from the authentic process. This espresso machine gives you a high-quality product with easy user experience. Feel like barista yourself when you grind the beans and steam your milk but without the hassle of keeping up with three separate appliances. While the machine looks like a complicated, professional one, it has actually been organized in a way for you to feel confident about making cafe-grade beverages with ease. There are three shape concepts: layer, build, and tool that make up this sleek appliance.

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Chef profile – Bruce Elsworth of Skipton cafe-restaurant Elsworth Kitchen

This year has been difficult for most in the hospitality industry, but imagine what it has been like for a young business having just invested so much in starting up.

Monday, 28th September 2020, 11:45 am

BAGGED TO GO: Bruce has diversified to develop new revenue streams at Elsworth Kitchen.

Bruce and Rebecca Elsworth, at Elsworth Kitchen in Skipton, were getting their feet firmly on the ground and growing in both popularity and reputation when lockdown was called.

Bruce is well known for his years as chef director at the Angel at Hetton, and between him and Rebecca, they have over 30 years in the business which has hopefully helped them weather what lay ahead for them on that fateful day in March.

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The two-storey café-restaurant is incredibly versatile with a menu taking you from breakfast to brunch, coffee to amazing cakes and a full-blown lunch, and on Friday and Saturday night Bruce’s talents shine with his dinner menu.

It is wonderful to see they have made it through, though I am sure like everyone is wondering what the future might bring. I wish them well; they so deserve to succeed.

What was the first dish you remember cooking? I was baking at a young age with my mum. The first thing I remember is perfecting the art of a Victoria sandwich and jam tarts so I could enter them in local shows.

Who is your culinary inspiration? Marco Pierre White, because he was the most exciting and controversial chef cooking inspirational food when I was a young chef. He created many dishes that are still emulated today.

Do you have a favourite cookbook? White Heat by Marco Pierre White and Keep it Simple by Alastair Little.

Who are your three dream dinner guests? Sir Sebastian Coe to talk about his epic track career and London’s 2012 Olympic journey. Lucas Radebe, the Leeds United Legend, on Leeds finally being back where they belong, and Keith Floyd for his amazing food knowledge and love of wine.

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Chef profile – Liz Cottam, Home, Leeds

Do you have a guilty food pleasure? I love good-tasting pies and pasties, especially my mum’s meat and potato pie.

What is your favourite ingredient? Mushrooms because there are so many different varieties offering unique tastes and textures, making them so versatile in many different dishes.

What did you do during the lockdown, and what are your plans for Elsworth Kitchen in the future? Through lockdown, we offered a contact-free ready meal delivery service every Friday plus the Elsworth Meat and Cheese Platter and a picnic box. They all worked so well we are carrying on with them.

As we are a young independent business, we had to look at new ideas and resources to guarantee a revenue stream. Thankfully, we were able to keep contact and provide a service for many of our customers, while gaining new

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Spice Kitchen’s chef Abudu hosts fundraiser Yemeni children

Abudu from Kafe Mamai was joined by Spice Kitchen from the International Rescue Committee (IRC) in Salt Lake City to raise money for Yemen.

Abudu works to prepare food that reflects his African-Caribbean cuisine, including cinnamon-dusted plantains and bhajia.

Photo: Ali Myers/IRC

Meals center on our culture, our ideas of home and family, they open up the community to a broader table. Sitting down to eat together can be powerful. Of all the questions that come up when opening a food business, though, Abudu of Kafé Mamai acknowledges that ’why’ is the most complex. For Abudu this may be especially true. While he loves to share his “culture and experience,” he is also passionate about using his small business to support others in his local community and around the globe. In August, Abudu worked to organize a fundraiser in support of Yemeni children. 

Abudu, like several others who are aware of the Yemeni crisis, has felt called to action. Yemen lies at the center of concurrent crises. While war threatens the lives of citizens, cholera and the coronavirus remain critical concerns as well. Two-thirds of the population are at risk of starvation. The risk of famine and hunger in particular spurred Abudu to begin raising money for Yemeni children to support efforts to increase access to food. 

“I come from a culture where it doesn’t matter where you’re from,” Abudu shares. “You always show hospitality. Even if you’re not eating, if someone comes here as a guest, you feed them.” In this case, Abudu is feeding people locally in order to feed families halfway across the globe. 

Abudu originally lived in Lamu, an island off the coast of Kenya, significant in Swahili culture and history and noted for its distinct architecture. He has lived in the states since 2001 and moved to Utah in 2016, where he quickly joined the Spice Kitchen Incubator program. He officially launched his food truck in 2019.

Abudu from Kafe Mamai was joined by Spice Kitchen from the International Rescue Committee (IRC) in Salt Lake City to raise money for Yemen.
Abudu organized the fundraiser for Yemen, calling upon food trucks across the city to support his cause. Photo: Ali Myers/IRC

“I like that his cuisine highlights his experience and travels,” Kate Idzorek, the Spice Kitchen Incubator program manager, says of the Afro-Caribbean influenced business. Abudu works to constantly improve Kafé Mamai, but he also dedicates time to the well-being of other entrepreneurs by checking in on them. “He’s a shining star,” Kate says. “He advocates for himself and others.” 

When Abudu first pitched the fundraiser last year, he started it as part of Spice To-Go, a hot meal pick-up service facilitated by Spice Kitchen Incubator. The staff at Spice Kitchen were eager to support his idea. This year, he wanted to do more: “Because [coronavirus] has taken over everything else, we don’t talk about things like Yemen,” he says. “It’s not that these things don’t happen [in the U.S.], too,” he explains, talking about hardship experienced in the U.S., like homelessness and hunger. “But it’s different. Worst comes to worst, we have resources.” 

All of the profits that Abudu earned during the fundraiser went towards the humanitarian crisis in Yemen. To further the reach of the fundraiser, he organized other food truck

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Chef Tom Becomes So Enraged He Storms Out of the Kitchen … or the Boat?

Chef Tom Checketts from Below Deck Mediterranean becomes unglued during lunch service as he ends up storming out of the kitchen. Could he be ready to walk?

Tom Checketts
Tom Checketts |Karolina Wojtasik/Bravo

Girlfriend Malia White warned Captain Sandy Yawn that Checketts was ready to leave as he grew more and more frustrated with the quality of the provisions. He explained that he is a perfectionist and that his reputation was on the line in the past few episodes.

Will he ultimately feel as though he can’t finish the last charter? Plus, why does he become so enraged in an upcoming episode?

The guests seem happy but Chef Tom stews

Guests on the last charter raved about Checketts’ food. A preview clip shows that the guests are also in love with the food too. But back in the galley kitchen, Checketts is melting down, upset with the fact he didn’t have time to fully debone the chicken before it was served.

“What a f**king disaster of a meal,” he tells White as she stands next to him. Yawn told White to stay out of the kitchen and away from Checketts at work, but clearly she is too concerned to follow orders. “I’m disgusted with this,” he adds.

RELATED: ‘Below Deck Med’: Chef Tom Tells Aesha Scott To ‘F**k Yourself’

“Last time I had the time to kind of bone all the chicken out and then re-fold the chicken with some herbs and lemon and whatever else inside,” he explains in a confessional interview. “But it still looks like a whole baby chicken. It’s a nice way of eating it. I didn’t have that time so I just quickly took the fillets off. It’s so frustrating.”

Chef Tom is pushed over the edge

Checketts plates the chicken and gets it ready to serve. “Do you want something on top of [it],” White asks Checketts about a garnish. But Checketts snidely responds, “Yeah, f**king crack cocaine.”

Aesha Scott stands by to run the chicken to the guests. “Tom’s this spoiled British brat,” Scott says in a confessional. “How do you see that as attractive?” But Scott remains professional, remarking that the chicken looks lovely.

RELATED: ‘Below Deck Med’: Aesha Scott Almost Saw ‘Evil’ in Tom Checketts’ Eyes

Suddenly Checketts can’t take it any longer. He throws his towel on the ground and storms out of the kitchen. “F**king hell!” he hollers as he walks away cursing. White, who is still in the kitchen, chases after Checketts. He clearly tries to find a space away from the cameras to meltdown.

White asks him what happened. “It’s just f**king sh*t,” he tells her. “It’s all f**king sh*t.” He continues to walk away down the stairs.

Chef Tom retreats to his cabin

“F**king hell,” Checketts says as he goes to his cabin. “I’m not gonna f**king do this. What a f**king joke.” He continues to curse as White stands next to him unsure what to do.

“Two more dinners to get through,” White reminds Checketts.

“I don’t

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