Award-winning Chattanooga designer offers tips on creating your dream kitchen

When Jackie Howard gets a call for one of her award-winning kitchen designs, her first thought is, “Please, not another white kitchen.”

The founder and owner of Scarlett’s Cabinetry, Howard has spent more than 30 years making clients’ dreams for their home come true. Her designs garnered her the title of “Best of the Best” in this year’s people’s choice awards by the Chattanooga Times Free Press.

Howard has seen countless trends come and go — like white kitchens, which have endured since the 1920s, when white was about the only color on offer. The country had just come out of the Spanish flu pandemic and a gleaming white kitchen was associated with sterilization, a huge selling point at the time.

Today’s crisp white kitchens can speak of cleanliness or homeyness, elegance or minimalism. In a word, they remain timeless.

“White kitchens still sell homes,” Howard says.

Photo Gallery

Award-winning Chattanooga offers tips for designing your kitchen

But today’s kitchens are no longer sequestered at the back of the house, tucked behind swinging doors and walls. They are the heart of the home both literally and figuratively. As such, Howard works to blend them into their surroundings, creating a seamless flow in the open, shared living spaces preferred today.

“Kitchens being open to the living space, you want to look in there and be happy. You want it to look like the rest of the space,” she says. “If you’ve got a lot of contrasting colors — even grays and whites — it screams ‘kitchen.'”

Here, Howard shares three of her kitchen designs and what they can teach us.

*****

“I think the biggest compliment of this kitchen is when you walk in you really have to look for the kitchen. Each piece is like a fine piece of furniture.”

This kitchen, designed for a family of five on Signal Mountain, channels an Old World French vibe.

“You can obviously tell she wants that warm, cozy, lived-in kitchen feel,” says Howard.

But some of the most important details from her rigorous client interview process aren’t necessarily about aesthetics, but whether a family cooks together, who cooks most often, even the height of the most prominent cook. This knowledge helps her determine spacing, placement and flow.

There’s no need for a pantry.

“A lot of people are scared of giving up a walk-in pantry,” Howard says, though she recommends maximizing every square inch by opting for drawers and slide-out cupboards.

Drawers offer seamless storage, both aesthetically and practically.

“You want everything at your hands … [so] anytime you can put a set of drawers instead of cabinets or pulls [I recommend it],” she says, adding, “We know now that, except for a big stockpot, everything can go in a drawer.” Instead, keep those big stockpots in a cabinet above the fridge.

Ceiling-height cabinets are handy, even if they’re not the most accessible.

“A lot of clients had cabinets that did not go to the ceiling,” says Howard. “What’s

Read more

The Brand: Mango’s Decor in Chattanooga offers a wide range of products for the home

Contributed photo / Mango’s gets new products in weekly ranging from art, lamps and mirrors to small gifts.

* Location: Mango’s is at 319 Cherokee Blvd., but will be moving to 2112 Dayton Blvd. in 2021.

* History: Mango’s Decor is a local home decor store in Chattanooga, owned and operated by Kristy and Randy Steele. Mango’s has been in business since 2014 and has continued to grow each year. In 2003, Kristy and her father, Mike Wood, started an import company called Old South Lamps and Accents. They grew that business over many years from a small startup in a warehouse in Nashville into a multi-state importer that sold to furniture stores throughout the country.

Kristy moved from the only sales representative selling to local furniture stores into managing multiple sales representatives. Kristy and her husband, Randy, decided to give the retail side of the furniture business a try and opened Mango’s Decor in an old warehouse in North Chattanooga. Mango’s will move into a new space in Red Bank in January 2021.

* Products: Mango’s Décor offers a wide range of products for the home such as custom sofas, chairs and recliners made in the United States. They also carry solid wood furniture made from mango wood such as coffee tables, end tables, dining tables, chests and consoles. Mango’s gets new products in weekly ranging from art, lamps and mirrors to small gifts.

Photo Gallery

The Brand: Mango’s Decor

Next Article

Previous Article

Source Article

Read more

These festival finds around the Chattanooga area include giant pumpkins, fair foods and Christmas decor

It’s fall, y’all, but in Lebanon, Tennessee, they’re thinking about Christmas — and making no apologies for the nod toward the next season.

“I once read somewhere that 70-80% [of consumers] start thinking about and purchasing their first items for Christmas in the month of September,” said Kristi Rowan, president of Midsouth Media Group, which produces Mistletoe Merchants, scheduled Friday through Sunday in Wilson County’s Farm Bureau Expo Center about 30 miles east of Nashville.

It’s one of five festivals happening or continuing in the tri-state area this weekend. A sixth, the DeKalb County VFW Agricultural Fair in Fort Payne, Alabama, starts Monday with a nightly carnival and other entertainment leading up to an all-day celebration on Oct. 3.

Other day-trip options include a jaunt to Marietta for a flavorful alternative to the North Georgia State Fair, happening the next two weekends, or to Pigeon Forge for the opening of the six-week Harvest Festival and Great Pumpkin LumiNights at Dollywood.

Closer to home, the Pumpkin Palooza family festival will take place Saturday at Greenway Park & Pavilion in Cleveland, Tennessee.

Rowan said Mistletoe Merchants is one of six spring and holiday markets her company produces in Tennessee and Mississippi.

“Last year we had about 5,000 shoppers, doubling from the previous year of 2,500,” Rowan said of the market, now in its fifth year in the Nashville area. “This event is really catching on and will soon be like our seasoned shows with 15,000 shoppers.”

Her 20-year-old Memphis show typically draws crowds of that size, she said, but it has been canceled entirely this year due to coronavirus concerns. For the Nashville event, several popular mix-and-mingle activities have been dropped, including Cupcakes & Cocktails, Muffins & Mimosas, Sangria Sunday and Santa appearances. However, general-admission shopping among the more than 100 vendors will take place as scheduled.

“This is a shopper’s chance to shop some of these unique businesses that you would not normally see, all while supporting small businesses and our economy,” Rowan said.

Likewise, the North Georgia State Fair has scaled back this year, canceling the midway and blue-ribbon competitions and revamping as Taste of the Fair.

Visitors will drive through to view the menus of at least 15 food vendors, then park for in-car or walk-up service. In-car service will provide a limited menu and an attendant who will take and deliver orders. Walk-up service will provide a full vendor menu, and visitors will leave their cars to order directly from the vendors. Masks are required for anyone choosing walk-up service.

At Dollywood, the seasonal programming includes more than 800 concerts by Southern gospel and bluegrass artists over the next six weeks, along with demonstrations by resident crafters and visiting artists, set amid the autumnal beauty of the Great Smoky Mountains. New for 2020 are pumpkins weighing up to 1,000 pounds each, great for using as photo backdrops or just for marveling at their colossal size. As the sun sets, the theme park transforms into a whimsical display of

Read more