Changing the Material of the Ceiling or Flooring in a Room

The information in this article applies to:

QUESTION

How can I change the flooring or ceiling material in my plan?  

ANSWER

Flooring and ceiling materials can be specified in the Default Settings for a specific floor or an entire plan. Additionally, floor and ceiling materials can be changed for individual rooms by accessing the Room Specification dialog. 

Adjusting the floor or ceiling finish using the default settings

  1. From the menu, select Edit> Default Settings .
  2. Expand the Floors and Rooms category, select the Floor/Ceiling Platform option if you want to adjust floor and ceiling finishes for all floors in a plan, or expand the Floor Levels subcategory, and select the floor of your choosing. Once one of these options is selected, click on the Edit button.
  3. In the next dialog that opens, select the Edit button next to the Floor Finish or Ceiling Finish option, depending on what you’re wanting to change.
  4. In the Floor/Ceiling Finish Definition dialog that opens, make any desired modifications to the floor/ceiling finish layers.

    Floor finish definition dialog showing two floor layers

    • Layers can be added below or above other floor/ceiling layers by selecting a layer and clicking on the Insert Above or Insert Below buttons.
    • Existing layers can be modified by clicking within the cell that correlates to the column you’d like to change.

      For example, if you’re wanting to change the material of a layer to something different, click on the material name for a layer. In the image above, you would want to click on the words: Light – MP Plank. To adjust the thickness, click on the 3/4″ value specified for Layer #1.

    • Layers can be deleted by selecting a layer and clicking on the Delete button.
    • To move layers, select a layer, and click on the Move Up or Move Down button to change the order.
    • Once all desired changes have been made, click OK.

Adjusting the floor or ceiling finish using the room specification dialog

  1. Using the Select Objects tool, click inside of the room where you want to change the flooring or ceiling material to select it.
  2. Next, click on the Open Object edit button to display the Room Specification dialog.
  3. On the Structure panel, click on the Edit button next to the Floor Finish or Ceiling Finish option to display the Floor/Ceiling Finish Definition dialog, where you can make any desired modifications to the floor/ceiling finish layers.

    Floor finish definition dialog showing two floor layers

    • Layers can be added below or above other floor/ceiling layers by selecting a layer and clicking on the Insert Above or Insert Below buttons.
    • Existing layers can be modified by clicking within the cell that correlates to the column you’d like to change.

      For example, if you’re wanting to change the material of a layer to something different, click on the material name for a layer. In the image above, you would want to click on the words: Light – MP Plank. To adjust the thickness, click on the 3/4″ value specified for Layer #1.

    • Layers can be deleted by selecting a layer and clicking
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White House virus protocol not changing despite diagnoses

President Donald Trump made the stunning announcement that he and First Lady Melania Trump had tested positive for COVID-19 early Friday. Here’s what we know:



a man that is standing in the snow: President Donald Trump descends from Air Force One at the airport in Morristown, N.J.


© ERIN SCHAFF
President Donald Trump descends from Air Force One at the airport in Morristown, N.J.

♦ Vice President Mike Pence tested negative for COVID-19 Friday morning, and his physician says that he doesn’t need to quarantine. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said she had been tested but was awaiting results.

♦ President Trump is showing mild symptoms of the coronavirus, chief of staff Mark Meadows confirmed on Friday.

♦ Former vice president Joe Biden on Friday offered thoughts and prayers for the president and first lady, and he has tested negative for COVID-19.

  3:24 p.m.  

11 positive virus cases related to debate setup

By The Associated Press

Cleveland officials say they’re aware of 11 positive coronavirus cases related to the setup and planning for Tuesday’s presidential debate.

The city said in a statement Friday that it’s working with state and federal officials and is involved with interviewing those who tested positive.

Earlier Friday, President Donald Trump announced that he and the first lady had tested positive for COVID-19. Both traveled to Cleveland on Tuesday for the first presidential debate of the campaign. It’s unclear where they contracted the virus.

Cleveland officials say most of the cases stemming from the pre-debate planning and setup involved people from out of state. They say health officials are now looking into their travels.

  3:21 p.m.  

Sen. Elizabeth Warren wishes president and first lady a “quick and safe recovery”

By Lauren Booker, Globe Staff

On Twitter Friday afternoon, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren shared her thoughts and well wishes for the recovery of the Trumps, White House staff, and those who have come into contact with the president.

She also sent her thoughts to Americans who have survived COVID-19 or been affected by the virus, and noted that the virus has taken more than 200,000 Americans lives, including a “disproportionate number in Black and Brown communities.”

Later in the message, she brought up President Trump’s previous comments and actions regarding the coronavirus.

“The President spent months undermining the work of our doctors and scientists, while he failed to help states and communities contain the outbreak,” Warren wrote.

She ended her message by emphasizing that “COVID-19 is deadly.”

  3:12 p.m.  

White House virus protocol not changing despite diagnoses

By The Associated Press

The White House does not appear to be making any changes to current virus protocol, even after President Donald Trump and the first lady tested positive for COVID-19.

A senior White House official said Friday that masks will still not be mandatory at the White House, describing facial coverings as “a personal choice,” despite overwhelming evidence that they help to stop the spread.

And the White House is not planning to move to a different, more reliable testing system after the one it

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Inuvo’s IntentKey Uncovers Changing Home Renovation Audience Behaviors in Midst of COVID-19 for National Home Improvement Retailer Client

LITTLE ROCK, Ark., Sept. 28, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Inuvo, Inc. (NYSE American: INUV), a leading provider of marketing technology, powered by artificial intelligence (AI) that serves brands and agencies, today announces how the IntentKey artificial intelligence (AI) technology has built strong brand awareness with new audiences for a national home improvement retailer client by uncovering changing audience behaviors in the midst of COVID-19.

The pandemic has created a boom in home remodeling, as more time at home has changed the way people need their homes to function. Houzz reported a 58% increase in professional referrals for projects year-over-year. In a Porch.com survey, more than 75% of consumers said they plan to take on a new project within the next 12 months. CNBC coverage also boasts record high equity is giving homeowners the financial flexibility and confidence to reinvest in their homes as real estate prices increase amid record low interest rates.

IntentKey’s national home improvement retailer client was opening a new store in the Northeast and was looking for digital solutions to build brand awareness with both consumers and contractors, while also driving traffic to the new store.

The IntentKey AI technology was able to identify audience insights unavailable through conventional marketing technologies. The IntentKey easily identified the expected audience interests in home improvement concepts, such as renovation, bathroom remodeling, Pergo flooring, vanities, affordable tile, travertine, and the like. However, the IntentKey was also able to expose an unknown trend wherein audiences were demonstrating an interest in product within a 60, 90 and even 120-mile radius that were out of stock locally. This audience intent was manifested because the artificial intelligence technology behind the IntentKey was able to associate the general home renovation concepts with these unexpected concepts like “out of stock” and “low inventory levels,” which in turn suggested contractor and consumer were willing to inconvenience themselves in this COVID-19 environment so as to get their projects completed.

“This discovery contradicts the behaviors of the typical home renovation shopper / contractor who generally source supplies from local home improvement stores. COVID-19 has created an environment where people are working from home, vacations have been canceled, and normal activities outside home have diminished. Collectively, this has led to an increase in home renovation for functionality and enjoyment,” said Tristan Cameron, VP of Sales & Account Management. “The IntentKey AI identified this greater distance travel trend and used it to automatically increase the size of the audience receiving the marketing. This discovery highlights the adaptive power of the IntentKey’s real-time updates, which adjusts marketing audience size based on just-in-time insights.”

For this client, the IntentKey AI was able to define a strategy the home retailer could capitalize on wherein their traditional, more local audience targeting approach could be expanded to capture a greater footprint of in-market audiences willing to travel for items they had in stock.

About the IntentKeyTM
Inuvo®’s IntentKeyTM is a patented, machine-learning technology designed to mirror the manner in which the human brain instantly associates

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Report highlights impacts of changing climate on B.C. Interior forests landscape



a tree in a forest: The Interior Douglas Fir biogeoclimatic zone is characterized by tall mature Douglas fir trees and a grassy understory conducive to mule deer. It's also vulnerable to climate change, which makes its reforestation a particular challenge, a new B.C. Forest Practices Board investigation has shown.


© Provided by Vancouver Sun
The Interior Douglas Fir biogeoclimatic zone is characterized by tall mature Douglas fir trees and a grassy understory conducive to mule deer. It’s also vulnerable to climate change, which makes its reforestation a particular challenge, a new B.C. Forest Practices Board investigation has shown.

The dry Douglas fir forests of B.C.’s Interior offer a stark illustration of how climate change is going to alter the province’s landscape, as well as the forest sector’s shortcomings in looking after the woods, according to new research by the B.C. Forest Practices Board.

Technically, the region is referred to as the Interior Douglas Fir (IDF) biogeoclimatic zone, an area of dry forest and grassy understory that covers a swath of the Interior that stretches from the Kootenays and the Okanagan up into the Cariboo plateau.

It covers five per cent of the province now, but shifting climatic conditions are expected to nearly double it in size over the next 60 years. However, research by the forest practices board has shown that the forestry industry is doing a mediocre job of managing the area for the future.

Timber companies relied too much on clearcutting and didn’t do enough selective harvesting that leaves a varied age structure of trees behind that mimics natural disturbances, which leave shade to help new trees in the IDF to regenerate. That is important because lumber producers running out of usable trees in areas ravaged by the mountain pine beetle are increasingly looking to the IDF as another source of timber.

“(The region) is not insignificant,” said board spokeswoman Darlene Oman, “(and) the board thought the results are important because they have implications for the longer-term timber supply. If the province is expecting these areas to produce a future crop of trees and they’re not necessarily growing back the way they think they are, that has timber-supply implications, and then it also has implications for wildlife habitat.”

In its investigation, and report on the IDF , the board found that timber firms were meeting replanting objectives and doing a good job of increasing the diversity of tree species that were replanted — getting away from lodgepole-pine monoculture — but weren’t always applying best-management practices.

Related

Investigators looked at harvested cut blocks in four different areas that were logged between 2007 and 2017, and found that 60 per cent of them, 44-of-69 sites, were in poor or marginal condition and unlikely to be healthy forests once they reach free-growing status.

“These sites may not grow to healthy forests in the long-term, and that has implications for future timber supply and other values, such as wildlife habitat,” said forest practices board chairman Kevin Kriese in releasing the report.

Kriese said the board is asking the province to reassess its long-term objectives for reforestation and update those along with the standards it expects timber companies to meet, in light of expected changes due to climate change.

In its conclusions, the forest practices board requests that government respond to the

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Report highlights impacts of changing climate on B.C. Interior forests

Article content continued

Kriese said the board is asking the province to reassess its long-term objectives for reforestation and update those along with the standards it expects timber companies to meet, in light of expected changes due to climate change.

In its conclusions, the forest practices board requests that government respond to the board by Feb. 21, 2021, and if it accepts the recommendations, submit a progress report on the measures it’s taking within 12 months of the report’s publication.

And the big decision may be whether to let the IDF become a major source of timber for forest firms to harvest at all. The IDF zone is one of B.C.’s driest ecosystems that could be pushed into becoming more grassland than forest by changes in rainfall coming with climate change, said University of B.C. forestry expert Sally Aitken.

“And the forest management practices can accelerate that or slow that depending on how they’re done,” said Aitken, a professor and associate dean in UBC’s department of forests and conservation sciences. “That zone is a tricky one to manage.”

The type of timber harvesting that works best in the zone, partial cutting versus clearcutting, that maintains ecological conditions for successful regeneration is a more expensive type of management, Aitken said.

“Therein lies the challenge,” she said. “Is that the right place to be our wood basket for the province?”

Aitken added that the IDF is also a fire-adapted landscape, but forest-fire suppression has let too many fuels build up in the forest understory. Now drought leaves it more vulnerable to fire.

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Why Home Improvement Has Surged And How It’s Changing America : NPR

“It used to be a backyard. Now it’s a summer oasis,” says Astoria Camille of the water feature she built in her mother’s Kansas City, Mo., backyard using an old stock tank and 53 bags of pea gravel.

Frank Morris/KCUR


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Frank Morris/KCUR

“It used to be a backyard. Now it’s a summer oasis,” says Astoria Camille of the water feature she built in her mother’s Kansas City, Mo., backyard using an old stock tank and 53 bags of pea gravel.

Frank Morris/KCUR

The sound of power tools is roaring in neighborhoods across the United States.

In the Brookside neighborhood in central Kansas City, Mo., John Buhr has do-it-yourself projects going from top of the garage to the basement.

“As soon as COVID hit, we needed someplace the kids could play,” Buhr says, noting that neighborhood parks were closed. “So we put a playhouse down [in the basement] first and then found the kids liked it so much that we went ahead and built a living room. And then my wife needed the space to work.”

So now Buhr is building an office for his wife in what was an unfinished attic above the garage. He’s also working on a self-contained apartment for his parents and in-laws to use when they’re in town for extended babysitting visits.

“This all kind of became immediately necessary, thanks to COVID,” Buhr says.

John Buhr now devotes much of his time to fixing up his family’s home in Kansas City. He’s building a playhouse for his young children, an apartment for the grandparents to use on their extended babysitting visits and an office for his wife, who supports the family working in the tech industry.

Frank Morris/KCUR


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Frank Morris/KCUR

Necessity is one factor driving the building boom. Americans have been forced to use their houses more — and differently. But that doesn’t account for the huge spike in demand documented by Max Anderson, chief economist at Porch.com. The company is an online marketplace connecting homeowners to contractors.

“This is all-time highs,” Anderson says. “In terms of like measured history in the United States, this is the, the highest levels of, of home improvement spending we’ve ever seen.”

Home improvement spending has been on a long steady rise, so it’s not too surprising that U.S. homeowners are on track to spend more than ever this year, but the surge in demand is striking.

Anderson measures demand based on searches for home improvement service projects on Porch.com. In the last three months, the company has tracked 330 million U.S. Google searches for home improvement work — that’s up almost 50% from the same period last year. Gardening is the type of home improvement up the most, but the projects range all over the home, inside and out.

Anderson says that just over 3 out of 4 homeowners whom Porch.com surveyed have completed a major project since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, and roughly the same percentage have one

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James McColley, former summer camp employee at Westfield YMCA, accused of photographing 5 female counselors and volunteers changing in bathroom

A former employee at a Western Massachusetts summer camp was charged last week with secretly recording multiple female staffers while they were changing in a bathroom, according to police.

James McColley, who worked at Camp Shepard at the YMCA of Greater Westfield, has been accused of recording five counselors and volunteers while they were undressing in late July and early August, authorities said.

The victims’ ages ranged from 14 to 22 years old, according to court records from Westfield District Court.

He was arraigned Friday afternoon from jail at the Ludlow House of Correction on 15 charges, including both misdemeanor and felony sexual surveillance, unlawful secret recording, posing a child for sexual photographs and possessing child pornography, officials said.

The 20-year-old Longmeadow man was expected to be released on $10,000 personal surety and is scheduled to return to court for a pretrial hearing in October, Westfield Police Capt. Michael McCabe told MassLive.

Officers investigated a report on Aug. 3 that McColley used his phone to record a camp counselor while she was changing inside a women’s bathroom out of her bathing suit into dry clothes, according to court records.

While changing her clothes, the counselor looked toward the ceiling and saw a cell phone with the camera pointed at her, police said.

McColley had allegedly reached over the wall from the men’s bathroom into the women’s bathroom with the phone in his hand, according to authorities.

On the same day, McColley agreed to speak with Westfield police officers but later called to say he would not be coming, court records said.

Police received a warrant to seize McColley’s iPhone, but the suspect refused to come to the door or to talk with authorities. His mother gave investigators the phone, which was processed a day later by Massachusetts State Police, according to officials.

Through processing the phone and interviewing witnesses and victims, authorities learned McColley had allegedly taken several photographs and videos of five different girls or women in states of undress. Three were older than 18, and two were not, court records said.

The images were taken without the female staffers’ consent in the same bathroom where they expected privacy, police noted.

It was later discovered that McColley searched how to make photo albums password-protected on the iPhone after he was allegedly caught photographing the counselor on Aug. 3, according to authorities.

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