OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Interior Secretary will lead BLM after judge ousts Pendley from public lands role | Trump, Biden spar over climate change at debate

HAPPY WEDNESDAY! Welcome to Overnight Energy, The Hill’s roundup of the latest energy and environment news. Please send tips and comments to Rebecca Beitsch at [email protected] Follow her on Twitter: @rebeccabeitsch. Reach Rachel Frazin at [email protected] or follow her on Twitter: @RachelFrazin.



a man wearing a suit and tie: OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Interior Secretary will lead BLM after judge ousts Pendley from public lands role | Trump, Biden spar over climate change at debate | Trump official delays polar bear study with potential implications on drilling: report


© Greg Nash
OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Interior Secretary will lead BLM after judge ousts Pendley from public lands role | Trump, Biden spar over climate change at debate | Trump official delays polar bear study with potential implications on drilling: report

CLICK HERE to subscribe to our newsletter.

FILL-IN THE BERN: The Department of the Interior will not name a new acting director to lead the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) after it’s leader was ousted by a federal judge, top officials told employees in an email obtained by The Hill.

Instead the job will be left to Interior Secretary David Bernhardt.

A Montana-based U.S. district judge on Friday ruled William Perry Pendley, the controversial acting director of BLM, “served unlawfully … for 424 days” and enjoined him from continuing in the role.

The decision was in response to a suit from Montana Gov. Steve Bullock (D), who argued Pendley, whose nomination to lead the BLM was pulled by the White House last month, was illegally serving in his role through a series of temporary orders.

A Wednesday email makes clear that Interior will not be placing the top career official in charge of the nation’s public lands agency, as its department manual dictates.

“I understand there may be some questions about the ruling on Friday regarding William Perry Pendley’s leadership role at the Bureau of Land Management,” Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Land and Minerals Management Casey Hammond wrote in an email to BLM staff.

“Secretary Bernhardt leads the bureau and relies on the BLM’s management team to carry out the mission. Deputy Director for Programs and Policy, William Perry Pendley, will continue to serve in his leadership role.”

Judge Brian Morris, an Obama appointee, ruled Friday that Interior and the White House improperly relied on temporary orders far beyond the 210 days allotted in the Federal Vacancies Reform Act while also violating the Constitutional requirement to seek approval from the Senate.

“The President cannot shelter unconstitutional ‘temporary’ appointments for the duration of his presidency through a matryoshka doll of delegated authorities,” he wrote.

Pendley has sparked controversy over the course of the year he has led BLM due to his long history opposing federal ownership of public lands as well as comments he has made questioning climate change and the Black Lives Matter movement.

Putting Bernhardt at the helm of the agency appears to comply with the court order from Morris.

But critics say the move centralizes power for the agency in the highest political circles after relocating more than 200 Washington, D.C.,-based positions to Grand Junction, Colo., in order to bring employees closer to the lands they manage.

The move leaves just 61 BLM employees in Washington.

“Secretary Bernhardt’s decision to centralize final decision-making in Washington,

Read more

‘The bathroom conversations are now open’: Bay Area artists react to call for change in theater

Director Lauren Spencer works during a rehearsal for “Black Butterflies” at American Conservatory Theater. Spencer is among those not surprised by an online posting about the experiences of people of color in theater. Photo: Michael Macor, The Chronicle 2017

If any white people were surprised by the depth and length of “The Living Document of BIPOC Experiences in Bay Area Theater,” local artists of color weren’t.

When actor, activist and teaching artist Lauren Spencer read the document, she thought, “I guess all the bathroom conversations are now open. So many incidents in that document I knew about.” It reminded her of the candid conversations she’s had often with fellow artists of color about racism in the industry, only now, not behind closed doors.

“There was a sense of sunshine, it pouring over the valley,” which “felt like a relief, a little bit,” she says.

People of color in Bay Area theater demand bold steps toward racial justice in online documents

Others felt it could have gone even further.

“I was honestly surprised there wasn’t more stories of racism,” says Baruch Porras-Hernandez, a writer, performer and stand-up comedian. “When I was trying to work as an actor full time, back around the 2006-ish years, I remember there being absolutely no room for these type of conversations. It was looked down upon. Even bringing it up was considered dangerous by most actors of color. You could be labeled ‘difficult’ and have your ability to get work completely disappear.”

San Francisco Mime Troupe member Velina Brown says the online document reveals how people are afraid to speak up. Photo: Nick Otto, Special to The Chronicle

For San Francisco Mime Troupe member Velina Brown, the “Living Document” demonstrates how “people are afraid to say in the moment, ‘This is not OK.’” It suggests that workers get shut down when they try to speak out. She sees the document as the consequence of getting dismissed over and over: “Those feelings don’t go away,” she says.

* * *

Marin Theatre Company’s Artistic director Jasson Minadakis (left) and playwright Thomas Bradshaw (right) watch actor Mark Anderson Philips during rehearsal of “Thomas and Sally.” The director and playwright were criticized for their handling of the play. Photo: Liz Hafalia, The Chronicle 2017

Some local white theater leaders say this document and others circulating online have influenced their companies’ plans.

Marin Theatre Company was mentioned in the “Living Document” and a June 13 statement from a “Coalition of Black Women Professional Theatre Makers in the Bay Area, California.” Both cited its controversial 2017 world premiere of “Thomas and Sally,” Thomas Bradshaw’s play imagining the relationship between Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings, the slave who bore him six children.

The coalition’s statement says Marin Theatre Company failed to follow through on commitments made in 2017: “At that time, they agreed to take accountability for the harmful impacts of their commissioning, development, and production of ‘Thomas and Sally’ by Thomas Bradshaw, and for their responses to gentle and rigorous questioning

Read more

House Democrats’ leadership races reflect coming generational change

Only one House Democrat in the caucus’s 14-member elected leadership team is exiting the chamber next year, but that opening has created a competitive race for assistant speaker and cleared opportunities for other ambitious Democrats to run for the lower-ranking positions those candidates are vacating.

With Assistant Speaker Ben Ray Luján running for the open Senate seat in New Mexico, three lawmakers — Tony Cárdenas of California, David Cicilline of Rhode Island and Katherine M. Clark of Massachusetts — are vying to replace him as the fourth-ranking House Democrat.

The top three leaders who have led the caucus for nearly two decades, Speaker Nancy Pelosi, 80, House Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer, 81, and Majority Whip James E. Clyburn, 80, are expected to stay in those positions, according to several Democratic lawmakers and aides CQ Roll Call spoke with for this report.

The team forming below them represents the generational change many rank-and-file Democrats have long sought. All of the candidates running were first elected to the House in the past decade.

Pelosi has promised she wouldn’t serve as speaker beyond 2022, so whoever becomes assistant speaker is likely a potential candidate to replace her. Democratic Caucus Chairman Hakeem Jeffries, 50, first elected in 2012, is seeking reelection to the No. 5 leadership post unchallenged and is another potential speaker hopeful.

Source Article

Read more

The #1 Kitchen Hack That Will Change Your Life

Garlic is an essential part of countless cuisines, from pasta sauces to naan. But peeling and chopping garlic can be a hassle, which is why you’ll find so many garlic hacks out there. But what’s the best way to chop garlic? Don’t worry—we have you covered.



woman-chopping-garlic-on-cutting-board


© Shutterstock
woman-chopping-garlic-on-cutting-board

Garlic cloves are so small, and your fingers must be strong enough to grasp onto the cloves so that you don’t have an accidental slip while slicing and dicing. We know, that’s a lot easier said than done, and knowing how to cut garlic the right way is a bit tricky.

We spoke with an expert—head chef of Hello Fresh Claudia Sidoti—to get the lowdown on how to cut garlic correctly so that you don’t chop your fingers off in the process.

And for more, check out these 52 Life-Changing Kitchen Hacks That’ll Make You Enjoy Cooking Again.

Read the original article on Eat This, Not That!

What’s the best way to cut garlic?

Sidoti says you can slice garlic in just six easy steps.

1. Pull a single clove from the garlic bulb.

2. Lay a knife blade flat on top of the clove.

3. Using the palm of your hand, push down on the blade with enough strength to crack the skin.

4. Peel the skin from the clove.

5. Cut off the root ends.

6. Use a gentle rocking motion to slice the cloves into several slices, or as many slices as your clove can generate.

And that’s all you need to do! So now you’ve uncovered the secret on how to cut garlic, but you most likely still have another lingering question…

RELATED: Sign up for our newsletter to get daily recipes and food news in your inbox!

Is there is a difference between sliced and minced garlic?

Yes, there most certainly is. First of all, it’s important to note that sliced and minced garlic do not look the same. Slices of garlic look exactly how they sound: They’re slices (like the steps you followed above). Minced garlic, on the other hand, refers to garlic pieces that have been chopped finely. OK, so then how do you mince garlic? Sidoti says that you should use a rocking motion to chop the garlic until it’s finely minced.

And as for the benefits of mincing, those smaller pieces will help enhance garlic’s natural flavor in a dish. “Minced garlic will distribute more flavor in a dish and is perfect in sauces and marinades,” Sidoti says.

RELATED: Your ultimate restaurant and supermarket survival guide is here!

Speaking of distributing more flavor, there’s another trick to getting the most savory flavor out of chopped garlic. If you’re using minced garlic in a sauté pan and are seasoning other vegetables, you’ll want to make sure you give the garlic time to simmer in the olive oil by itself before tossing in any other foods into the pan. Heat the garlic with spices of your choice just until it becomes fragrant and

Read more

White House seeks to change subject from 200K COVID-19 deaths

The U.S. death toll from COVID-19 surpassed 200,000 on Tuesday, but the grim milestone passed without too much of a comment from a White House more focused on the battle over the Supreme Court.

Trump used a recorded speech to the annual United Nations General Assembly on Tuesday to condemn China for unleashing “the plague onto the world” but did not mention the fact that the U.S. was nearing 200,000 deaths.

The U.S. passed that marker a couple hours later, according to John Hopkins University.

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany opened her briefing about 90 minutes later with an attack on Democrats about the battle to nominate a successor to liberal Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgGraham: GOP will confirm Trump’s Supreme Court nominee before the election Trump puts Supreme Court fight at center of Ohio rally The Memo: Dems face balancing act on SCOTUS fight MORE.

She did not mention the 200,000 death toll until she was pressed about it by reporters.

“We grieve when one life is lost,” McEnany said, while citing models early in the pandemic that showed the death toll could have been in the millions without any intervention.

Asked if Trump planned to acknowledge the 200,000 milestone either on Twitter or at his Tuesday night rally, McEnany did not answer but argued the president had expressed his condolences “throughout this pandemic.”

“He has said before that it keeps him up at night thinking of even one life lost,” she said. “This president has taken this incredibly seriously. And what he’s done is he’s worked harder. Each and every day he works hard, puts his head down, and I think that’s very evident in the administration’s historic response.”

Vice President Pence was the rare official to acknowledge 200,000 Americans had died when he told the crowd at a New Hampshire campaign rally that the U.S. had reached a “heartbreaking milestone” and extended his thoughts to those who have lost loved ones to the virus.

Trump did not mention the death toll from the coronavirus at his Monday evening rally in Swanton, Ohio, where many in the crowd were not wearing masks. Members of the crowd earlier in the night booed Lt. Gov. Jon Husted after the Republican urged people to put on their masks, which were branded with Trump campaign messages. Ohio Gov. Mike DeWineMike DeWineTrump supporters boo GOP Ohio governor at rally Ohio bars local, state officials from closing churches, changing election dates New York puts Ohio back on travel advisory list MORE (R), who earlier this year locked down much of the state to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, also received a mix of cheers and boos at the rally.

Trump acknowledged the 100,000 death mark in May by tweeting it was a “very sad milestone” and ordering flags outside the White House be lowered to half-staff. Flags at the White House are already lowered to half-staff in honor of Ginsburg.

Polls show a majority disapproves of Trump’s handling

Read more