Garden centres struggle to source organic mulch and due to Covid lockdown supply chain issues

Garden centres struggle to source organic mulch and bark chippings due to Covid lockdown supply chain issues

  • Lockdown supply chain problems and increased demand caused shortage 
  • Mulch is applied in spaces between plants and around base of shrubs and trees
  • Autumn is favoured as the ground is warm, meaning more heat and moisture

It is the time of year when those with green fingers think about mulching their shrubs before temperatures plummet and the first frosts arrive.

But lockdown supply chain problems and increased demand have resulted in a shortage of organic mulch products and bark chippings, garden centres have said.

Mulch should be applied in the spaces between plants and around the base of shrubs and trees to strengthen the soil and protect the roots.

It is the time of year when those with green fingers think about mulching their shrubs before temperatures plummet and the first frosts arrive

It is the time of year when those with green fingers think about mulching their shrubs before temperatures plummet and the first frosts arrive

It can be used at any time of year but autumn is favoured as the ground is warm, meaning more heat and moisture can be trapped in the soil. 

Mulch also helps to reduce weeds and provide nutrients for plants.

Materials such as bark chippings, leaf mould, straw, well-rotted farmyard manure and crushed shells can be used to cover the soil. 

But the Garden Centre Association said there was a shortage of mulch and bark chippings, caused by a ‘knock-on effect’ of lockdown which affected the supply of raw materials across the compost sector.

Iain Wylie, chief executive of the GCA, said: ‘Where garden centres are able to source supplies, they are often finding that it is selling out very quickly after delivery.’

However, Vicky Nuttall, of the Garden Industry Manufacturer’s Association, said garden centres may have blips in their supply chains ‘but in general… mulch is out there’.

Materials such as bark chippings, leaf mould, straw, well-rotted farmyard manure and crushed shells can be used to cover the soil

Materials such as bark chippings, leaf mould, straw, well-rotted farmyard manure and crushed shells can be used to cover the soil

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ECA’s interior design students imagine cultural centres for Edinburgh

In this school show, Edinburgh College of Art students are presenting 10 interiors projects for public and community spaces, from an archive chronicling Scotland’s black diaspora to a hybrid day and nightclub.

Created by a mixture of graduate and undergraduate students, the concepts adapt existing and historical buildings in Edinburgh for new uses, in a bid to create interiors that are sensitive to their context.


University: Edinburgh College of Art, University of Edinburgh
Courses: BA and MA Interior Design
Tutors: Ed Hollis, Rachel Simmonds, Gillian Treacy and Andy Siddall

School statement:

“The interior design programmes at ECA use real buildings and spaces as testbeds for the adaption and evolution of interior, architectural and spatial design ideas. Under the Interior Lab initiative, staff and students share research knowledge to develop their own individual response to the discipline, benefitting from the international cohort’s varied experiences and approaches.

“Further work of the students can be found at ECA’s digital exhibition Summer 2020.

“Through self-generated briefs for their projects, our 10 graduates have proposed designs including an Astronomy Centre within a light-polluted city centre and a Black Cultural Archive and Legacy Centre for Scotland.”


ECA's interior design students imagine cultural centres for Edinburgh

The Island of Knowledge by Alkistis Brountzou, MA

“The Island of Knowledge is an open, public space inside the Freemasons Hall for sharing knowledge and learning, which explores the spatial intersections of the physical and the digital world.

“Inside the main hall, or ‘nest’, new hybrid experiences are generated by utilising new technologies such as augmented reality inside of an expanded cinema, various multilayered exhibitions and lecture halls.

“The intervention’s form emphatically symbolises the contradiction between the diachronic character of the space formations and the extremely changeable digital content, suggesting that the physical and digital, materiality and immateriality are interwoven by their contradictions.”

Email: [email protected]


Freemasons Hall by Gillian Kavanagh, MA


“My master’s thesis focuses on the intersection between interior architecture and conservation. The design briefs I devised for the Freemasons Hall in Edinburgh challenge the idea of a historic institution in the modern world and question how interiors can be ‘re-programmed’ to revitalise the institution’s appeal.

“To represent these ideas, I explored experimental mixed media drawing methods including collage, watercolour sketching and video studies. Adaptive conservation aids the longevity of buildings, which is the principal ambition of my work. The layering of materials, decoration and human narratives significantly influences my approach to the conservation of interior architecture.”

Email: [email protected]
Instagram: @gk_trinsic


ECA's interior design students imagine cultural centres for Edinburgh

Viaticus by Mari Nasif, MA

“Inspired by the idea of Masonic degrees, the brief re-imagines the Freemasons’ journey towards knowledge and translates this into spatial settings based on the learning domains proposed by Benjamin Bloom.

“The proposal, broadly defined as a philosophy library, occupies the voids inside of an existing staircase volume. Its verticality mirrors Bloom’s hierarchical learning model where higher levels house more complex learning. Each degree is uniquely designed to activate the senses and help individuals resolve the cognitive challenges along the journey to mastery.”

Email: [email protected]
Website: marinasif.com


Pixelbox by Sher Ming Foo, MA

“Pixelbox

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