Argentina surpasses 900,000 COVID-19 cases, virus spreads to the interior

FILE PHOTO: Men recovered from the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) donate convalescent plasma, at the Hemotherapy Institute in La Plata, Argentina October 5, 2020. REUTERS/Agustin Marcarian

BUENOS AIRES (Reuters) – Argentina surpassed 900,000 cases of coronavirus on Monday, with strong growth of infections in large populated centers in the interior of the country after months of the virus’ being concentrated in Buenos Aires and its suburbs.

The government late last week tightened restrictions on the movement of people in 18 provinces for two weeks due to the growth of COVID-19 cases. On Monday, the Health Ministry said the death toll reached 24,186 and the number of infections totaled 903,730. During the previous 24 hours, 318 deaths and 9,524 new cases were reported.

As an example of the virus’ spreading outside of Buenos Aires, in areas untouched by the virus in the early days of the pandemic, more than 90% of the intensive-care beds at the Centenario hospital in the city of Rosario, 300 kilometers north of Buenos Aires, are occupied by COVID-19 patients, hospital staff told Reuters.

Rosario is the main ports hub carrying agricultural commodities from the Pampas farm belt to export markets. Argentina is a major global soybean, corn and wheat supplier.

“Hopefully we continue as we are, with 95% to 97% occupancy (of ICU beds) and that narrow margin will allow us to have a reasonable turn-over of beds,” Rosario intensive care doctor Juan Pendino, 62, told Reuters.

Over the last week Argentina registered almost 100,000 new cases, with a positive rate of 72.5% as of Sunday, one of the highest levels in the world.

“We are not going to have normalcy again – neither in the short- nor medium-term – until we have a high rate of immunization of the population, either naturally or through a vaccine,” Gerardo Laube, an infectious disease doctor at the Muniz Hospital in Buenos Aires, told local radio on Monday.

Reporting by Jorge Otaola and Juan Bustamante; writing by Hugh Bronstein; Editing by Leslie Adler

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Fashion designer dies, Cleveland Browns attendance upped, White House cases, more – coronavirus timeline Oct. 3-9

CLEVELAND, Ohio – Here is our regular roundup of coronavirus facts, figures and numbers regarding Cleveland, Ohio, the United States and the world Oct. 3-9:

Oct. 3: CNN says only three states – Texas, Missouri and South Carolina – are reporting a decline in new cases compared to last week, as the country hit its highest daily rate in almost two months. Twenty-one states report an increase in cases. Chris Christie, former New Jersey governor and aide to President Trump, announces he tested positive. He joins several other prominent figures who tested positive, including Kellyanne Conway and Ronna McDaniel, chairwoman of the Republican National Committee. CBS News reports that the California governor’s office, in a Tweet, suggests restaurant-goers keep their masks on “in between bites.”

Oct. 4: Trump leaves the hospital and takes a ride with Secret Service members, drawing criticism for leaving a quarantined and controlled health environment. The Ohio Investigative Unit cites Barley House in Cleveland for violations regarding sales for on-premises alcoholic consumption. Club Paradis in Cleveland receives an administrative citation for improper conduct and limitation on hours for on-premises consumption. Kenzo Takada, founder of the French luxury fashion house Kenzo, dies of coronavirus. He was 81.

Oct. 5: After seeing high infection rates, officials in Paris say bars will be shut down again today. The Ohio health department allows the Cleveland Browns to double spectators to 12,000 at FirstEnergy Stadium. For the first two home games, the Browns received an exemption on the coronavirus gathering limit and were allowed 6,000 fans in the stadium. Ohio reports 1,057 new coronavirus cases, with the total approaching 160,000. Deaths are at 4,931. Cleveland has 36 new cases. So far, 1 in 73 Ohioans are known to have contracted Covid. Dr. Mike Ryan, director of the World Health Organization’s Health Emergencies Program, says about 10% of the world’s population has had the virus. That translates to about 760 million people. President Trump, upon his release from the hospital, says: “Don’t let it (coronavirus) dominate you.” White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany (photo above, bottom right) says she has tested positive.

Oct. 6: Trump policy adviser Stephen Miller announces he has tested positive. Dr. Anthony Fauci says if health precautions are not followed, the United States could hit 400,000 deaths by winter. Kent State University will ask 450 random students to be tested weekly and partner with CVS. Kent campus reported 40 new cases for the week of Sept. 27.

Oct. 7: Half the U.S. states are reporting increases in Covid cases. Iranian state television reports 239 fatalities, a record number of daily deaths for the country of more than 80 million people. Ohio has 1,424 new virus cases. In all, 162,723 people have had coronavirus. The number of deaths increase 23 to 4,970. Cleveland’s Department of Public Health says it has not identified any more coronavirus infections while conducting contact tracing on 11 positive cases linked to the presidential debate in Cleveland. None of the 11 people who tested positive

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Coronavirus live news: WHO daily cases set new record at more than 350,000 | World news





Trump again calls for in-person debate, citing doctor’s letter

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What we know so far: Trump expected to return to public engagements on Saturday

Updated





Donald Trump added more turbulence on Thursday to the US presidential race by refusing to participate in the next presidential debate with Joe Biden after it was changed to a virtual event to guard against the spread of Covid-19, prompting both campaigns to propose postponing it a week.

On Thursday morning, the Commission on Presidential Debates (CPD) said that the next presidential debate, due on 15 October, would be a virtual affair, with the candidates appearing remotely.

“In order to protect the health and safety of all, the second presidential debate will take the form of a town meeting, in which the candidates would participate from separate remote locations,” it said.

But Trump, who was hospitalized for three days after disclosing last Friday that he had tested positive for the coronavirus, blasted the format change announced by the nonpartisan commission in charge of the debates and expressed concern that his microphone could be cut off at the event:

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Pence, Harris to meet in vice presidential debate as Covid cases surge in the White House

SALT LAKE CITY — Vice President Mike Pence and Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., are set to meet Wednesday night at the University of Utah in the vice presidential debate as both candidates face intensified pressure to demonstrate they are prepared to step in as commander in chief.

The vice presidential debate typically draws little fanfare, Pence and Harris will be examined by voters who are choosing between two senior citizens for president.

President Donald Trump’s coronavirus diagnosis last week sparked questions over the transferral of the powers of the presidency. Democratic nominee Joe Biden has said he sees himself as a “bridge” to the next generation of Democrats, raising speculation as to whether he would seek a second term.

Regardless of who wins, Trump, 74, and Biden, 77, would both set a new record for the oldest president on to take the oath on inauguration day.

The 90-minute debate will be moderated by USA Today’s Susan Page and will begin at 9:00 p.m. ET. It is the only vice presidential debate of the 2020 presidential campaign.

The debate will be divided into nine segments of approximately 10 minutes each and there will be no commercial breaks. Topics are not being disclosed ahead of time.

Harris will also make history as the first Black woman and the first Asian American to participate in a general election debate as a candidate on a major-party ticket.

While Trump’s diagnosis is expected to hang over the debate hall, Wednesday’s event will also feature a visual reminder of the ongoing pandemic and the nearly 20 people tied to Trump who have tested positive for the virus in the past few days.

Sheets of plexiglass will separate the two candidates on the stage, an extra safety measure that Harris requested because of Pence’s potential exposure to Trump. There was some concern that Trump could have infected Biden during last week’s debate. Biden has consistently tested negative.

The Commission on Presidential Debates announced that the candidates would also be separated by more than 12 feet, an increase from the 7 feet that kept Trump and Biden apart.

Masks are also required by all attendees except for the candidates and the moderator. The CPD has indicated that the mask requirement will be enforced on Wednesday, following last week’s debate when members of the Trump family ignored the rule.

Both Pence and Harris have tested negative for Covid-19 multiple days in a row, according to their campaigns.

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Interior Health reports 8 new cases of COVID-19

A larger-than-normal number of new COVID-19 cases was reported by Interior Health today.

The health authority announced eight new cases of the virus, which is just the fourth time since July 24 that eight or more new cases have been reported in a single day.

<who>Photo Credit: NowMedia

It brings the total number of cases in the BC Interior to 556 since the start of the pandemic.

Currently, 25 cases are active and two of them are in hospital.

There are now seven cases linked to the outbreak at Calvary Chapel Kelowna, which was declared on Sept. 25.

The Teck Coal Mines outbreak, which was declared all the way back on Aug. 27, is still active, but there hasn’t been a single IH resident associated with it.

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102 new cases of COVID-19 in B.C.; 8 in Interior Health


FILE PHOTO – B.C. provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry speaks to reporters during a COVID-19 update, Aug. 24, 2020.

Image Credit: SUBMITTED / Province of B.C.



October 06, 2020 – 3:27 PM



Interior Health is reporting eight new cases of COVID-19 in the last 24 hours, raising the regional total to 556.


That amounts to fewer than 10 per cent of new cases provincewide, which was 102. Since the start of the pandemic, there have been 9,841 cases of COVID-19. In the last day there were two more COVID-19 related deaths, for a total of 244 deaths  in B.C.


While the caseload is continuing to rise at a rate beyond what was seen earlier in the summer, provincial health officials still say that B.C. is turning a corner.


”People are doing the right thing and, as evidenced by the latest modelling data, individual actions are making a difference for all of us to stay safe and strong in the face of COVID-19,” Dr. Bonnie Henry, B.C.’s provincial health officer, and Stephen Brown, deputy minister of health, said in a statement today, Oct. 6.


“Public health measures are a part of our ‘new normal.’ As a result, we are starting to flatten our curve once again. There is no question that what we do today directly influences the well-being of our communities tomorrow, so let’s continue to do our part to protect ourselves and each other – each day and every day.”


There are 1,384 active cases of COVID-19 in the province, while 3,089 people are under active public health monitoring as a result of identified exposure to known cases.


Currently, 71 individuals are hospitalized with COVID-19, 16 of whom are in intensive care. The remaining people are recovering at home in self-isolation.


Since the start of the pandemic, there have been 3,612 cases of COVID-19 in the Vancouver Coastal Health region, 5,038 in the Fraser Health region, 221 in the Island Health region, 324 in the Northern Health region and 90 cases of people who reside outside of Canada.



To contact a reporter for this story, email Kathy Michaels or call 250-718-0428 or email the editor. You can also submit photos, videos or news tips to the newsroom and be entered to win a monthly prize draw.


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With the President hospitalized, more Covid cases emerge in White House and campaign

President Donald Trump was taken to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center early Friday evening less than 24 hours after news broke of his Covid-19 diagnosis, plunging the country into a deepening crisis as the circle of current and former aides to the President testing positive rapidly widened.



a large building: WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 02: A view of the White House on Friday evening after U.S. President Donald Trump left the White House for Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on October 2, 2020 in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump have both tested positive for coronavirus. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)


© Drew Angerer/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC – OCTOBER 02: A view of the White House on Friday evening after U.S. President Donald Trump left the White House for Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on October 2, 2020 in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump have both tested positive for coronavirus. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

By early Saturday, former White House counselor Kellyanne Conway and the President’s campaign manager Bill Stepien had both tested positive, which followed the positive diagnoses of two US senators who had attended Trump’s Supreme Court nomination announcement last weekend, and Trump senior adviser Hope Hicks on Thursday.

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It was a remarkably fast escalation of the virus’ threat — which the President has long downplayed — from an infection that caused him mild symptoms, to a fever to then being airlifted to the hospital, all while spreading quickly throughout the government and his campaign.

Shortly before midnight, the President’s physician, Navy Cmdr. Dr. Sean Conley finally gave an update on the President’s condition, saying in a memo that the President is “doing very well” and has not required any supplemental oxygen, but that doctors have initiated the antiviral drug remdesivir, which has been shown to shorten recovery time for some coronavirus patients.

Conley added that he had recommended the President’s movement from the White House to Walter Reed earlier Friday in consultation with specialists from both Walter Reed and Johns Hopkins University.

Around the same time, Trump tweeted: “Going well, I think! Thank you to all. LOVE!!!”

Trump’s diagnosis — followed by his move to Walter Reed, where the White House said he plans to stay and work for “the next few days” — presented the most serious known health threat to the US presidency since former President Ronald Reagan was non-fatally shot in 1981.

The decision to take Trump to the hospital marked a sharp turn from the statement Conley made early Friday when he first confirmed the Covid-19 diagnosis of Trump and first lady Melania Trump, and said the couple would remain at the White House during their convalescence.

Wearing a suit and mask, Trump, who’s 74, gave a low-key wave to the press but took no questions as he walked without assistance across the South Lawn of the White House to Marine One, the helicopter that airlifted him to the hospital. He left for Walter Reed after receiving a dose of the experimental medical treatment Regeneron — which may have signaled a rising level of concern among his physicians, Dr. Jonathan Reiner, CNN medical analyst and professor at George Washington University, told CNN on Friday.

Though White House staff claimed the President made the move “out of an

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Number of Covid cases grows among people who attended White House ceremony

The number of people from President Donald Trump’s inner circle who have tested positive for the coronavirus is growing, with at least seven confirmed cases tied to an event in the Rose Garden last weekend.

On Saturday, Trump officially announced Amy Coney Barrett as his nominee to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg as the next U.S. Supreme Court justice at an outdoor ceremony attended by more than 150 people, many who did not wear masks or social distancing.

In addition to the president and first lady, at least five other who were at the ceremony have been confirmed to have Covid-19: former top Trump aide Kellyanne Conway, Republican Sens. Thom Tillis from North Carolina and Mike Lee from Utah, Notre Dame President Fr. John Jenkins and a White House journalist.

Conway is the latest to confirm she was infected.

“Tonight I tested positive for COVID-19,” she said in a statement Friday night. “My symptoms are mild (light cough) and I’m feeling fine. I have begun a quarantine process in consultation with physicians. As always, my heart is with everyone affected by this global pandemic.”

Trump, who is being treated at Walter Reed Hospital, where he is receiving experimental treatment and expected to remain for several days, revealed in a tweet his and Melania Trump’s diagnoses early Friday, sending everything from the upcoming presidential election to the Supreme Court confirmation into question.

Democrats were quick to call for a delay in Barrett’s confirmation hearing, but Republicans pushed back and said they intend to move forward with the process. Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham, chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, said in a tweet Friday that the hearings remain scheduled to begin Oct. 12 and raised the possibility of virtual hearings.

“We now have two members of the Senate Judiciary Committee who have tested positive for COVID, and there may be more. I wish my colleagues well,” Sen. Chuck Schumer, a New York Democrat, said in a tweet. “It is irresponsible and dangerous to move forward with a hearing, and there is absolutely no good reason to do so.”

Both Tillis and Lee are members of the Judiciary Committee.

“Over the last few months, I’ve been routinely tested for COVID-19, including testing negative last Saturday, but tonight my rapid antigen test came back positive,” Tillis said. “I will be following the recommendations of my doctor and will be self-isolating at home for 10 days and notifying those I’ve been in close contact with.”

Other members of Trump’s inner circle, including his children, said they have tested negative for the virus.

Conway’s daughter, Claudia Conway, posted a video on TikTok announcing her mother’s diagnosis even before the elder Conway issued a statement. Claudia Conway said she is “furious” that her mother, who brushed off wearing a mask during the pandemic, exposed the family to Covid-19.

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Coronavirus live news: one million deaths worldwide; warning that Germany faces 19,200 cases a day | World news

Global deaths from Covid-19 have reached 1 million, but experts are still struggling to figure out a crucial metric in the pandemic: the fatality rate – the percentage of people infected with the pathogen who die.

Here is a look at issues surrounding better understanding the COVID-19 death rate.

How is a death rate calculated?

A true mortality rate would compare deaths against the total number of infections, a denominator that remains unknown because the full scope of asymptomatic cases is difficult to measure. Many people who become infected simply do not experience symptoms.

Scientists have said the total number of infections is exponentially higher than the current number of confirmed cases, now at 33 million globally. Many experts believe the coronavirus likely kills 0.5% to 1% of people infected, making it a very dangerous virus globally until a vaccine is identified.

Researchers have begun to break down that risk by age group, as evidence mounts that younger people and children are far less likely to experience severe disease.

“The death rate for people below age 20 is probably one in 10,000. Over the age of 85 it is around one in 6,” said Dr. Christopher Murray, director of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington in Seattle.

Gravediggers in Indonesia have struggled to cope with demand from Covid-19 deaths.

Gravediggers in Indonesia have struggled to cope with demand from Covid-19 deaths. Photograph: Ed Wray/Getty Images

What is a “case fatality rate”?

There has been an apparent decline in death rates when measured against the number of new infections confirmed by coronavirus testing. In places like the United States, that “case fatality rate” has fallen dramatically from 6.6% in April to just over 2% in August, according to Reuters statistics.

But experts said that the decline has largely been driven by more widespread testing compared with the early days of the pandemic, detecting more people who have mild illness or no symptoms. Improvements in treating the severely ill and protecting some of the highest-risk groups, are also credited with improving survival.

“We are much more aware of potential complications and how to recognize and treat them,” said Dr. Amesh Adalja of the Johns Hopkins University Center for Health Security in Baltimore. “If you are a patient who gets COVID-19 in 2020, you would much rather get it now than in March.”

A Covid-19 test being conducted in Guwahati, in northeastern India.

A Covid-19 test being conducted in Guwahati, in northeastern India. Photograph: Xinhua/REX/Shutterstock

What does that mean for individuals, and governments?

That highlights the need for continued vigilance, as some countries begin to experience a second wave of infections.

For example, researchers in France estimate that country’s case fatality rate fell by 46% by the end of July compared with the end of May, driven by an increase in testing, improved medical care and a greater proportion of infections occurring in younger people, who are less likely to experience severe disease.

“Now, we are seeing a fresh rise in hospitalisations and ICU (intensive care unit) registrations, which means this discrepancy is about to end,” said Mircea Sofonea,

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Prairie House sees 6 new employee coronavirus cases

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Six more cases of the coronavirus were reported among employees at the Prairie House Living Center in Plainview.

According to the latest numbers provided by the Texas Department of Health and Human Services, which were last updated on Sept. 3, Prairie House has reported 27 total cases of the virus among its employees. Six of those cases were still active through Sept. 3.

Ten of the 58 total reported cases among residents were active through the latest reporting day. Fifteen residents have died and 32 have recovered from the virus in the facility.


The Plainview Healthcare Center had no active cases of the virus with 19 total reported cases.

No active cases were reported for Castro, Floyd or Swisher County nursing facilities as of Sept. 3.

Zero cases of the virus have been reported at either Beehive Homes of Plainview or Santa Fe Place as of the latest reporting date.



The Beehive Homes of Shepherd’s Meadow in Floydada had 12 total active cases of the virus – seven among employees and five among residents.

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