Kitchen Garden: Nature’s buzzing along Dairy Road | The Canberra Times

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This week the kitchen garden meets nature. First stop Jerrabomberra Wetlands (hat, boots and water bottle recommended). From the car park walk into the first bird hide called Ardea (a genus of herons). It is dark and quiet and we watch a pair of ducks bobbing their heads as they swim (spring flirting) and a pair of masked lapwings on an islet in Kelly’s Swamp. From the next hide a couple with binoculars point out shoveler ducks with three ducklings. A quad of pelicans do a fly past. The sound of church bells is drowned out in the sunken frog-watch area where water is a centimetre below metal gratings. Something is splashing around in this reach of the Molonglo, an Australian water rat, a carp or maybe a platypus. The area where you walk between reeds as high as your shoulders is particularly alluring. Driving along Dairy Road there is a burst of colour. Canberra City Farm is a partner with Floriade: Reimagained and vibrant poppies, tulips and pansies, well mulched, line the fence. Christine Vincent was the Floriade team leader from CCF with four female assistants for the planting plus two males who did bed preparation and mowing. From the gates of the City Farm you can compare Canberra red clay soil with beds black with compost. Broad beans are surrounded by a rosemary hedge and bright orange calendulas. One plot is filled with huge artichoke plants and massed borage, hundreds of bees buzzing its blue flowers. People can walk in through the wetland gateways but, because of COVID restrictions, twice weekly opportunities have been set up for interested people to visit on supervised tours. You can book on [email protected] for a one-hour tour on Monday or Thursday mornings. The President of CCF, Dr Fiona Tito Wheatland, says there are 55 allotments, half 40 sq metres and half 20 sq metres. The age range covers 60 years with many younger people accessing the plots in the last round of offers. This year two beds reserved for refugee families, nominated by Canberra Refugee Support, have been taken up. In the heart of the farm is a row of espaliered fruit trees planted by long time committee member Keith Colls with help from other volunteers. It is now being tended by Vanessa Goss. Keith says the idea is to demonstrate how backyard gardeners can grow fruit trees in a small space. These trees are on dwarfing stock so are planted close together and will never grow above three metres tall for easy netting to control pests and also to pick the fruit. Half are quinces and half eating apples except one which is a Yarlington Mill cider apple. To the north are five varieties of hazelnut trees. Fiona Tito Wheatland says warm weather and regular rain means most of the crops are thriving. Winter bitter greens, kale, coriander, silverbeet and beetroot are being followed by chicory, Warrigal greens, broad beans, garlic and

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Kitchen Garden: When life gives you lemons | The Canberra Times

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Following reference to a peach tree grown from a seed by Betty Cornhill and still producing a good crop of peaches in the Canberra Organic Growers’ Society garden now named after her in Curtin, Sue McCarthy of O’Connor said the photo of the tree by Minh Chu (Kitchen Garden, September 22) “resonates with me because, just like Betty Cornhill, all of us gardeners have limited time to leave a more lasting impact. Trees do that.” In a local nursery recently a young man from Downer was consulting a book while looking at trees for sale. His choice was between the tulip tree (liriodendron tulipifera) and the sugar maple (acer saccharum). Both need extra water in Canberra and tulip trees suffer from hot winds. There is a sugar maple forest at the National Arboretum planted in 2009. The sap from mature trees is used for making Canadian maple syrup. Original property owners in this district often planted bunya pines (araucaria bidwillii) near their homesteads. There is also a bunya forest at the Arboretum, historic trees at Lanyon homestead, one on the corner of Kings Avenue, another in Weston Park’s English Garden. In March, below a tree near the gates to the Australian National Botanic Gardens was a fallen cone with its edible seeds. On September 23 in a letter to The Canberra Times, a woman from Belconnen wrote, “What blissful rain washing the stench of our flowering plum trees out of the air. A pity we missed the hail, it might have knocked their flowers off as well. Why do we continue to plant these trees which smell of rotting fish in so many Canberra streets?” Do flowering plum trees have an unpleasant smell? I have not noticed it. The blossoms have been described as having a “fantasy floral note with a fruity nuance”. Jo Malone London created a scent called plum blossom, “a floral, woody, musk fragrance for women”. However I have been guilty of saying white blossoms of the double row of Manchurian pears beside Lake Burley Griffin smell like “fox’s urine”. Ridiculous because I have never smelt urine from a fox. It reminds me of a Canberra woman who says the pinot I drink “tastes like cat’s piss” . Last year I read The Overstorey (2018) by Richard Powers which went on to win the Pulitzer Prize for fiction. It is a novel about nine people in America and their experiences with specific trees. It led me to a grove of the western yellow pine (pinus ponderosa), in a heritage forestry/CSIRO precinct in Yarralumla, just to smell the bark. In four seasons on sunny days there was a warm kitchen scent of butterscotch and vanilla. The tree has “plates” of bark which are beautiful and aromatic. In America the fragrant resin of P. ponderosa has been used in perfume, candles and soap. For home gardeners the most often planted tree with edible fruit must be the lemon. This winter has

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Inside the Japanese retreat at 28 Mackennal Street in Canberra

Behind the unique front of this 1950s home lies a spectacular ‘Japanese retreat’ – complete with a dreamy bathroom sanctuary, modern decor and an airy open plan living area perfect for entertaining

  • An architect has created an epic oriental retreat fronted by an unassuming façade on a quiet Canberra street
  • The one-of-a-kind home at 28 Mackennal Street in Lyneham was inspired by Japanese interior design
  • Made from Australian-sourced recycled materials, it has four bedrooms, two bathrooms and a four-car garage
  • Standout features include a bath clad in Tasmanian oak and a grass-watering system controlled from an app
  • The outdoor deck is made out of timber salvaged from a basketball court at the Australian Institute of Sport
  • So unique is the design that the home is nominated for the 2020 Master Builders Association Housing Awards

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An architect has transformed a 1950s brick cottage into a unique oriental retreat fronted by an unassuming façade on a quiet Canberra street.

Redesigned in collaboration between construction firm MegaFlora and architect Blake O’Neill, the one-of-a-kind two-storey at 28 Mackennal Street in Lyneham, in the capital’s leafy north, was inspired by the owners’ love of Japanese interiors which are simple but always of the highest quality craftsmanship.

Built from recycled materials sourced across New South Wales and the ACT, the four-bedroom house – which took three years to complete – has sustainability etched into every corner.

The outdoor entertainment deck is made out of timber salvaged from an old basketball court at the Australian Institute of Sport, while a whopping 680 metres of repurposed hardwood battens run along the ceiling alone.

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The redesigned 1950s cottage at 28 Mackennal Street in Canberra, which has been transformed into a unique four-bed home

The redesigned 1950s cottage at 28 Mackennal Street in Canberra, which has been transformed into a unique four-bed home

Spacious living areas with towering ceilings and a north-facing kitchen which opens onto the terrace are spread over 292 square metres, along with a master bedroom complete with a walk-in wardrobe and ensuite with two showers.

‘The open plan design of the master bedroom and ensuite makes it feel generous but the use of darker colours and a high level window which captures the street trees helps to create a sense of intimacy and privacy,’ architect Blake O’Neill told Daily Mail Australia.

A wooden bathtub clad in recycled Tasmanian oak is the centre-piece of the master bathroom which is flooded with natural light and covered in handmade floor-to-ceiling finger tiles – a traditional interior trend in the ‘Land of the Rising Sun’.  

The north-facing kitchen has sliding doors which open onto the outdoor entertainment deck, made from recycled timber

The north-facing kitchen has sliding doors which open onto the outdoor entertainment deck, made from recycled timber

Four bedrooms (one pictured) are spread over the 292 square metre house

Handmade finger tiles (pictured) are fixed to the walls of the two bathrooms

Four bedrooms (one pictured left) and two bathrooms fitted with handmade Japanese finger tiles (right) are spread over the 292 square metre house

Custom features include a steel fireplace (pictured) and recycled hardwood battens which run along the ceiling

Custom features include a steel fireplace (pictured) and recycled hardwood battens which run along the ceiling

Other custom features include a steel frame encasing the brick fireplace and an

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My grandson has given me back my garden | The Canberra Times

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Among his many gifts, my grandson has given me back my garden. In past years I performed all those unskilled routines fit for an untutored Australian gardener. I swore at the cord on the lawnmower, burned piles of leaves in the gutter, prayed for a drop of rain, delighted in the early arrival of jonquils, and fretted about trees entangled with power lines. Time moves on. Now the family takes turns to chide me whenever I am tempted to climb ladders to clear gutters. Balancing on uneven ground on a rickety wooden stepladder, hanging on to the bough you are about to cut, that is a job best done without any family scrutiny. My knees and back shame me after a couple of hours’ weeding or planting. My purchases from nurseries sometimes thrive, but often wither and die. Rudimentary Latin studies never induced me to show off by reciting the botanical names of plants. I have been taught to prune, but my pruning nowadays resembles a search-and-destroy operation. Then my grandson, Theo, focused and charmed every facet of my work outside. From Virgil to Jamaica Kincaid runs a long tradition of soppily banal writing about gardening. Those authors insist that gardening is both vocation and recreation. Working in the garden is meant to be spiritually therapeutic, physically beneficial and mentally clarifying. However overblown, not all that advice is silly. During lockdown, staying in the open air, earning your keep, revelling in a light wind or gentle shower and seeing the results of your labour are all serious, stabilising defences against melancholy. Adding a grandson to the mix, however, gives every task zip and fun. I had never expected a young helper in the garden. I suspect that, if Millennials will not iron their clothes, they are also unlikely to weed the garden. Screen time is not compatible with attentively observing a flower bed. A 10-year-old, though, is still forming habits and working out what to love. MORE MARK THOMAS: Even if you are only 10, you can know exactly what you want. Instead of my few token bloomers near the front door, Theo lobbied for clumps of pansies mingled with the early jonquils. Under his direction, we have potted and trained raspberry canes. Purchases and placements of saltbush and kumquats have been matters for debate. I lose. A new worm farm is revelling in our kitchen refuse. A sweet pea has filled a gap at the front. Progress with each plant is meticulously monitored, first perused, then touched and smelled. In the process, any shortcomings in my care are politely noted and implicitly deplored. The garden responds. After drought, the hailstorm and bushfires, Theo has timed his entrance perfectly. He has brought rain. In addition, he comes with an intense eagerness to learn. Finally, I have someone to teach how deep and wide to dig a hole for a new plant. Skipping a generation, I have found a new gardener who aches

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Kitchen Garden: Sampling regional delights with dinner | The Canberra Times

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Lucky Canberrans must support our country producers within an arc from Yass to Collector to Braidwood. Bellchambers Produce in Fyshwick, established in 1948, is a place for the home gardener to browse. There are paper bags of chicken mash for your organic poultry, bins of black sunflower seeds and dog food. A bloke in a ute parked next to me had the tray filled with pea straw and six bags of Martin’s Premium Potting Mix. I purchased some of the latter – Martin’s Fertilizers are based in Yass. Hessian sacks of seed potatoes had lured me to Bellchambers. Six years ago I was given a seed potato (which had been “chitted” or allowed to develop one large eye) at an Italian cafe in Cronulla. My single spud, which the cafe people said was bintje, produced 14 new potatoes 10 weeks later (Kitchen Garden, February 11, 2015). This time I have planted the Dutch cream variety atop a 15cm layer of potting mix with a top layer of Who Flung Dung mulch and more potting mix. My potato looked like David Pope’s Canberra Times cartoon (September 17) of a Federal Minister’s head. If planting in the ground Bellchambers recommends a trench 20cm deep and when the potatoes have flowered you can bandicoot some baby new potatoes. They store better with a bit of dirt on them. The Heritage Nursery at Yarralumla has a printed sheet called Growing Potatoes in Canberra which includes tips such as “growing potatoes is a great way to break up heavy soils in new gardens”. They had bags with nine certified seed potatoes in three varieties but, as the nurseryman said a week ago, “sold out, COVID”. Tatey growing bags have an easy-to-harvest hatch if you are short of space. On September 20 clouds cleared to a blue sky and a group gathered in the stone walled garden at Helen Stephens Gallery in Collector for drinks and nibbles at the opening of “Insectarium”. The guest of honour was possibly Seamus, the wool-curled sheep over the wall who welcomed some nose stroking. The jewel-like art works of bees with honeycomb, beetles, bogong moths and butterflies will be on exhibition until October 25 (Fridays to Sundays 11am-4pm). Try Some Cafe just up the road for a bite to eat (check their opening times). Enjoy a tasting at Collector Wines where the spring pink 2019 Shoreline rose has “mandarin, cherry, rosewater and spice aromas”. We came away with six bottles. Outside, there are benches and tables beside raised beds of plants and rows of crab apples in pink and white bloom. The village creek is full and Lake George is blue with water. Cathy and Jenny, producers from Garlicious Grown in Braidwood, launched their black garlic in 2014 and it is used by leading chefs and shortlisted in the Food and Beverage Industry Awards this spring. They have shared a special recipe with us. The current season has been tough in

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Kitchen Garden: Blooming good fun in spring | The Canberra Times

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The spring equinox is a joyful time for gardeners. Our mystery photo of the first flowers of Floriade Reimagined and the last mouthful of fruit salad (Kitchen Garden, September 1) stumped readers. Floriade head gardener Andrew Forster knew it where it was as he helped plant that display with staff from the National Portrait Gallery. Deirdre Ward, of Campbell, first thought it was at The Lawns in Manuka, where rows of pansies and tulips are planted in the raised bed where a plane tree fell some months ago. She and husband Lionel had been eating at Typica, the cafe formerly known as ONA. Then they went to the National Portrait Gallery. Solved. In the Wards’ home garden bees are supping on the purple flowers of Hardenbergia. See the three ribbons of flowers at the NPG then swing in to the Pub Rock exhibition or at Floriade NightFeast on October 2 when Broadbean Catering is among two dozen venues celebrating food for Floriade Reimagined. Their exclusive event features pub rock food and music (bookings essential). Our Diggers Van Gogh’s Landscape sunflowers giveaway resulted in a haiku from Len Leason, of Griffith. A reader admired poppies and tulips outside the Peter Yorke Building (entry to John James Hospital). Walk to EQ Cafe and Bakehouse in Kent Street for a croissant with housemade strawberry jam or a lamington with a syringe filled with the jam. Pansies bloom outside the IGA on Giles Street in Kingston. After lunch at Pomegranate Restaurant nearby, order their special Turkish ice cream. Head chef and owner Erkin Esen says it contains the ingredient salep powder. It takes 1000 orchid roots to make 1kg salep consequently, Esen says, the orchids are endangered. Enjoy the treat while you can. At Kingston Foreshore a thousand poppies are fluttering in shades of orange, yellow and white in a breeze off the lake. Sit at tables in the sunshine with a takeaway healthy combo salad from Local Press Wholefoods, one block up Giles Street. They sell reusable cloth face masks. The three-layer cotton designs with fruit and avocados sold out quickly so you will have to email BigBiteEco, owned since 2017 by creative Australian designer Seonaidh. (Masks must not have gaps so add aluminium flashing or a pipe cleaner to the bit over the bridge of the nose if necessary. Gardeners should use a mask when working with compost, potting mix or perlite, and some mulches.) Floriade boxed plantings outside the National Library, the Yamba Drive emergency entry to the Canberra hospital, Gungahlin Place and Dickson Town Centre have a secret. Look into poppy plantings where the foliage of tulips awaits their turn to bloom. There are Floriade potted plantings in Bruce, Calwell and Woden and community Floriade plantings in other suburbs. At Hughes shops, near the outdoor eating area of Home Ground cafe (try their sweet potato and date slice), are pots with baby olive trees and tulips. A reader says children from Hughes Primary kindergarten

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BACKYARD BLISS | Utilising companion planting in your urban garden | The Canberra Times

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As our spring crops are gradually going in, we’re making space for some sister action to take place, all three of them – corn, pumpkin and beans – together like they should be. These three plants are a guild of plants traditionally grown in Native Amerrican agriculture. Dating back around 5000 years, it is so successful, it’s now on of the most popular “pin ups” for companion planting around the world. The symbiotic relationship between these three plants is particularly wonderful, here’s how it all works. Structurally, the corn does what it does best, and grows tall and straight providing the perfect climbing pole for beans to grow up. The beans provide nitrogen to the soil, being heavy feeders, both the corn and pumpkin lap this up for their own use. Meanwhile the squash (generally a type of pumpkin) sprawls in and around the base of these two plants acting as a living mulch with its big, shady leaves. It also helps suppress or slow the growth of weeds due to this pattern of growth. Apparently corn lacks the amino acids lysine and tryptophan, which the human body needs to make proteins and niacin, but beans contain both and therefore corn and beans together help provide a balanced diet. And of course, if one of the crops fail (due to pest or disease) it is ‘backed up’ by another two – so you never go hungry, clever. From the perspective of the plant’s root profiles, these three plants all have different root ball shapes where they inhabit different levels of soil meaning they’re not competing for nutrients. So clever, so sophisticated. The other great thing about this guild (there are many) is that you can plant it on any scale, so even if you have a small urban garden (like we do) you can still have a productive patch in a relatively small space. We’ve allocated a garden bed roughly 5 metres by 3 metres, which will include around 16 corn and bean plants and two sprawling pumpkin plants. However we’ve also planted it in smaller beds. Being in a cool temperate climate, we’re yet to establish this year’s three sisters garden outside, but we thought we’d get a head start and get the corn and pumpkins going inside first. They’ll be moving outside soon, where we’ll direct sow the beans at the base of each corn plant. When you’re planting this guild, be sure to give the corn a head start as the beans grow so fast they’ll quickly catch up to the height of the corn. If you’re in a warmer climate, you can direct sow all three seeds at the same time straight into your garden area, they’ll all go gang busters. Where ever you are, make sure your soil has lots of food, like manure and compost, as corn and pumpkin are hungry plants and require healthy, nutritious soil to thrive. Utilising companion planting in your urban garden or

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Kitchen Garden: A most colourful courtyard | The Canberra Times

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Christine Mounic’s courtyards are a colourful combination of the edible and ornamental. A pot painted bright yellow with green spots containing a Meyer lemon tree with its green foliage and glowing yellow fruit welcomes people to her front gate just beyond the carport. A path to the front door divides two small courtyard areas, one with a table for outdoor eating surrounded by pots of every hue holding spring bulbs and flowers. The other section has troughs attached to the wall, on benches and the paving, filled with radishes, lettuce, carrot, beetroot, broccoli, bok choy, pak choy and sugar peas. It is the perfect example of what can be grown for the kitchen in a restricted area. No sooner had we met (I was just a stranger, out walking) than she was picking crunchy sugar snap peas fro the vines for us both to eat on the spot. When I remarked on the lemon tree, Christine showed me her pantry filled with jars of recently homemade marmalade and generously gave me a jar. Perfect texture and scrumptious – explanations about the recipe follow at the foot of this column. Christine has eclectic taste both indoors and out. On an unsuccessful mission many years ago to find a largish red outdoor pot she spray painted a plastic pot instead. Easy, cheap and can be repainted any time using “squirt spray paint from Bunnings”. Owning her little garden in Woden for the past 20 years encouraged Christine to grow edibles for the satisfaction of picking fresh green and red edibles in the hope they make it into the kitchen before she eats them. She has learnt how and what to grow via many questions to people at nurseries where she buys seedlings, particularly from Bunnings, and from friends and the internet. Her preferred potting mix is Scotts Premium Osmocote and she has easy access to sheep manure. A compost system is being set up. Christine’s father worked for the Department of Trade and the family had two postings in the Philippines and in Trinidad, both for three years. Christine returned to Canberra when she was eight and stayed until she finished a BA in administration at the University of Canberra. She was always encouraged to travel and went back-packing in Europe and lived in London for nine years. In springtime Christine and her partner cook stir fries and lighter tomato based pasta dishes. She enjoys cooking and experimenting with recipes. Their barbecue starts getting used and the food is accompanied by salads from the garden. With some encouragement, Christine joins her partner canoeing on the Lake or walking around it but her main hobbies are gardening and reading. Birds are a part of her life and Christine has filled her north-facing lower courtyard, which opens onto open land, with Australian native plants both in pots and in the ground. Grevilleas are in flower most of the year and that attracts the

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Kitchen Garden: More than just a little bit of veg | The Canberra Times

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Robin Hall was introduced via a photo (sent to us by his friend) of Robin’s head next to a two kilo head of broccoli head. A modest man, Robin said he grows “a little bit of veg” so a visit to the garden in Gilmore was a big treat. Born in Sydney, Robin has been in Canberra for 20 years. He and his wife, Joanne Hall, have lived in Gilmore for eight years on a site chosen for its sunny, north-facing flat block. One side of the no-dig veggie patch is ground level and the other area is 400mm above ground. The first thing Robin did was to plunge his hand into the black soil and wriggled his fingers until he was down to mid-forearm level. He purchases cow manure, one cubic metre at a time and composts everything, with a wood chipper used at home for prunings and everything that is cut back. He has a compost heap plus manure from the chicken coop. There are four handsome brown chooks, purchased from Bellchambers. The Halls have lost more than a dozen chooks to foxes but have now solved the problem, closing a tiny gap in the roost. Rows in the vegetable garden include chest-high broad beans and snow peas, cabbages, pumpkins, beetroot, carrots, lush coriander, radishes, onions, garlic, lettuces and kale. Robin said had many heads of broccoli this year that were more than a kilogram in weight. These are lightly steamed in one centimetre of water or eaten with a white sauce and cauliflower or added to a dry stir fry pasta vege mix. Robin unwrapped growing leaves from the last cauliflower then pulled it from the ground, captured by our Canberra Times photographer. In the sunroom trays of seedlings are growing from seed indoors before planting out, to spare them from voracious slaters. Small pots of beans, cucumbers and tomatoes among them. Robin’s latest online order was for bags of certified potatoes which are waiting to sprout before planting. They include Purple Congo, Nadine, White Star, Pink Eye and Pontiac. Both Joanne and Robin love cooking. Their recipes are from everywhere but Joanne’s Italian background does have an influence. She was born Giovanna but was encouraged at school to change to an Australian version so children could relate. Joanne said each evening they pick the ingredients for that night’s dinner. A favourite is raw grated carrot with grated beetroot, garden greens particularly French sorrel, rocket, coriander, parsley and very finely sliced kale with La Barre extra virgin olive oil and vinegar with a “mother”, fermented sediment in the bottle (sold at delis and some supermarkets). Joanne also uses apple cider vinegar with “mother”. Another simple dish is boiled home laid eggs with raw cashew pieces lightly cooked and currants to which you can add a piece of beef or chicken. She makes plum jam from their homegrown fruit, and green tomato chutney, and makes three-layered sponge cake with passionfruit icing. There

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Virtual garden bringing hope in COVID-19 | The Canberra Times

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Lifeline plans to send a powerful message to those struggling during the pandemic inviting them to visit a virtual garden and plant a message of hope. Lifeline Australia chairman John Brogden says coronavirus restrictions have heightened the need to demonstrate support and provide a safe space for those affected by suicide to mourn and reflect. More than 3000 Australians die from suicide every year, with each life lost leaving families, friends, colleagues and communities devastated, he says. World Suicide Prevention Day is on Thursday – a day when Lifeline brings communities together through its Out of the Shadows events. Community walks take place at sunrise to mourn loved ones lost to suicide and reduce the stigma by bringing suicide into the light. However, this year physical distancing restrictions means Lifeline is encouraging Australians to visit a virtual reflective garden to plant a flower and leave a message of remembrance or support, to show those who are struggling that they are not alone. “The COVID-19 restrictions are exacerbating isolation, there are many left to grieve or struggle with their thoughts alone,” Mr Brogden said. “The things we used to keep busy with can often no longer be done. Many of our opportunities for connecting with others have been removed.” “So this year, we are calling on every Australian to make this garden bloom and help Lifeline send the clearest signal yet to those who are struggling that they are not alone.” To visit the virtual garden, go to outoftheshadows.org.au. People are also invited to safely hold private reflective sunrise walks to observe in accordance with COVID-19 physical distancing restrictions. Lifeline 13 11 14 beyondblue 1300 22 4636 Australian Associated Press

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