SVA Interior Design Faculty Join NYCxDESIGN’s ‘Ode To NYC’ Poster Campaign

Jack Travis’ poster, We Keep From Goin’ Under, a reference to a lyric by Grandmaster Flash and The Furious Five, the seminal South Bronx hip-hop group. “It was important to me to celebrate an iconic message expressing the love for my beloved city, created by one of the most beloved NYC designers, with another iconic message from my most beloved borough,” Travis says. “You cannot stop NYC. Love you, NYC, Miss you, Milton Glaser!”

 

NYCxDESIGN’s “Ode to NYC” posters are available for sale on Poster House’s website, with proceeds going to the Black Artists + Designers Guild (BADG), a nonprofit aimed at creating a more inclusive and equitable art and design world.

 

“The local designers we tapped have created poignant, inspiring posters that illustrate the resiliency, strength and rebirth of our beloved city,” says Valerie Hoffman, program director, NYCxDESIGN.

“As a collective of independent Black artists, makers and designers striving towards creating inclusive art and design environment through equity and representation, we are gratified and excited to be a part of this wonderful initiative, put forth by the efforts of so many talented New York-based creatives,” Malene Barnett, founder of BADG, says.

 

For more information on the “Ode to NYC” poster designers, locations and sale, go to NYCXDesign.

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A chaotic campaign helped save Rhode Island’s House speaker in 2016. Now it threatens to end his political career

“I used to joke with people, ‘Are you sure you want to be seen with me? Because the speaker could be watching.’” Frias recalled in an interview last week.

Turns out, even that was true.

Last week’s criminal trial of former Mattiello campaign consultant Jeffrey T. Britt was meant to determine whether Britt laundered $1,000 to help pay for a postcard mailer designed to boost Mattiello during that 2016 campaign. But it also offered a rare glimpse into the win-at-all-costs culture of politics, as witness after witness detailed the strategies employed to help defeat Frias.

Those tactics included surveillance conducted on Frias by a semi-retired private investigator who was seeking a state job, a mail-ballot operation run by a veteran operative who had previous tours of political duty with some of the state’s most corrupt politicians, and the mailer that Britt orchestrated to try to convince a handful of Republicans to back the Democrat in the race.

In the end, Mattiello won the race by 85 votes, a razor-thin margin where almost any maneuver could have tipped the scales in the speaker’s favor.

Now, with early voting scheduled to begin Wednesday, Mattiello’s back is against the wall again as he faces a serious challenge from Barbara Ann Fenton-Fung, the Republican wife of Cranston’s popular mayor, who is eager to capitalize on the seedy details that came out during last week’s trial.

But Mattiello, who was never charged, testified that he knew nothing about the controversial mailer until it hit mailboxes in his district, and a key campaign aide described the mailer as “Jeff Britt’s project.”

The judge has said he won’t issue a ruling for five to seven weeks. So that means voters will render their decision first, in the Nov. 3 general election.

“I think it clearly crossed a line,” Providence College political science professor Adam Myers said of Mattiello’s campaign operation in 2016. “But the question is whether the public’s opinion of Rhode Island politics is already so jaded that coverage of the trial won’t change any minds.”

* * *

If it’s possible for the most powerful politician in the state to be an underdog in his own backyard, hindsight suggests that’s where Mattiello – the man whose rock-solid support within the Rhode Island House of Representatives gives him almost dictatorial power over any piece of legislation – was sitting four years ago.

House District 15 includes fewer than 11,000 registered voters, the majority of whom are unaffiliated but are considered far more conservative than residents of the rest of Cranston and almost every other city in the state. Mattiello frequently draws criticism from more liberal members of his party, but his political values – pro-business, pro-life, pro-National Rifle Association – are largely in line with the voters who have sent him back to the State House every two years since 2007.

But in 2016, simply being a conservative Democrat wasn’t going to be enough to guarantee Mattiello a victory. Cranston’s Republican Mayor, Allan W. Fung,

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People in the GOP, White House, and Trump’s campaign increasingly think they will lose the White House, and maybe the Senate too, reports say



graphical user interface, application: President Donald Trump speaks from the Blue Room of the White House on Octover 10, 2020. Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images


© Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images
President Donald Trump speaks from the Blue Room of the White House on Octover 10, 2020. Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

  • Republicans and White House officials fear that President Donald Trump is headed for defeat, according to a series of recent reports.
  • Some fear the GOP could lose control of the Senate in a “blue wave” of Democratic votes on November 3.
  • The gloom from Republicans seems supported by polling data, which paints an increasingly negative picture for Trump.
  • Trump’s much criticised performance in his debate with Joe Biden and, his behavior when diagnosed with COVID-19, are among factors said to be alienating voters. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Fears are growing in the Republican Party and White House that Democratic nominee Joe Biden may be on course for a landslide presidential election victory, according to multiple reports. 

The weekend brought further gloomy polling data for the Trump campaign, with an ABC/Washington Post poll released Sunday showing that Biden has support of 53% of likely voters to Trump’s 41%.

The result matched trends in a series of other recent polls showing the president trailing Biden on average by 10 points or more. 

Swing state polls brought more bad news  — with Biden continuing to hold a lead in states that flipped to the Republicans in 2016: Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Michigan, according to data compiled by the New York Times.

Though the races in these states are tighter, Biden’s lead has been consistent. It led to a rash of bad headlines prompted by worried insiders:

  • Citing dozens of White House and Trump campaign officials, the Associated Press reported on Monday the fear that Trump’s widely criticised first debate performance with Biden and erratic response after being diagnosed with COVID-19 could see them lose not just the White House but also the Senate. 
  • NBC News on Friday reported that Republican donors and operatives worry a “blue wave” is coming. They are said to favor shifting resources from the presidential race — seen by some as a lost cause — to protecting vulnerable Congress seats. 
  • Texas GOP Senator Ted Cruz on Saturday warned that the GOP faced “a bloodbath of Watergate proportions” and could lose control of the Senate and White House if conditions are wrong come polling day.
  • Reuters also last week reported that the GOP was increasingly anxious that the Democrats are poised to seize control of the Senate. Trump’s coronavirus diagnosis was “the nail in the coffin; it’s all over” for the party’s hopes of defending its majority, a senior Senate Republican aide told the outlet. 

Though Trump’s prospects of victory may appear to be fading, some campaign officials believe the president will able to claw back ground this week, reported AP.

The Senate confirmation hearings of judge Amy Coney Barrett, which begin on Monday, are expected to take focus away from the pandemic and fire up conservatives.

Other officials hope that, as in 2016, pollsters are undercounting

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Trump’s White House event had hallmarks of campaign rally

President Trump’s first public appearance since he announced his COVID-19 diagnosis appeared to be an unofficial rally at the White House. On Saturday, Mr. Trump addressed hundreds of supporters closely gathered and dressed in Trump campaign gear, repeating unfounded claims of election fraud, attacking Democratic leaders, and falsely claiming that Joe Biden is a socialist. 



a group of people in front of a crowd posing for the camera: President Trump Delivers Speech To Supporters From White House Balcony


© Samuel Corum / Getty Images
President Trump Delivers Speech To Supporters From White House Balcony

Trump speaks at first in-person event since COVID-19 diagnosis

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White House spokesman Judd Deere said the event was an “official” event, and “the campaign is not involved in this.” Anyone in attendance was invited by the White House, Deere said.

While using the White House for a partisan political event is a violation of the Hatch Act, Deere insisted Saturday’s event had “no Hatch Act implications” because it was run by the White House and not the campaign. 

The Hatch Act does not apply to the president or vice president, but does apply to any other executive branch officials who are involved. The president has been accused of repeatedly ignoring the act, most recently during the Republican National Convention. 

“This is another example I think of the myriad ways in which Donald Trump breaks the rules, and over time, people stop getting agitated about it because he breaks the rules all the time,” Washington Post national correspondent Philip Bump told CBSN’s Lana Zak following the event. “Essentially, he is using taxpayer money to bolster his campaign.” 

The address was made from the balcony overlooking the South Lawn, where Candace Owens’ BLEXIT Foundation was hosting a pro-police rally. Mr. Trump specifically addressed the crowd, telling them their shirts are “beautiful” and that he wants to “put one of them on instead of this white shirt.”

“We have to have law and order,” Mr. Trump said. “I want to thank the BLEXIT Foundation for organizing this event, and especially your two founders, two friends of mine, great people Candace Owens and former Tucson police officer Brandon Tatum. Great job, what a great job. … Thank you very much for being here.” 

Owens tweeted on Saturday that the foundation helped pay for some attendees to travel to Washington, D.C. 

The address was listed on the official White House schedule as “remarks at a peaceful protest for law & order.” 

Virginia Representative Don Beyer, a Democrat, immediately criticized the president for the event, tweeting, “As Trump again uses the White House for a campaign speech, doubtless with the illegal use of taxpayer resources and funds, the Republican National Convention remains under investigation for Hatch Act violations.”



a group of people in front of a crowd posing for the camera: WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 10: Supporters cheer as they wait for U.S. President Donald Trump to address a rally in support of law and order on the South Lawn of the White House on October 10, 2020 in Washington, DC. President Trump invited over two thousand guests to hear him speak just a week after he was hospitalized for COVID-19. / Credit: Samuel Corum / Getty Images


© Provided by CBS News
WASHINGTON, DC – OCTOBER 10: Supporters cheer as they wait for U.S. President Donald Trump to address a rally in support of law and order on the South Lawn of the White House on October 10, 2020 in Washington, DC. President Trump invited over two thousand guests to hear him speak just a week after

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Trump’s post-hospital White House appearance takes on campaign rally themes

Oct. 10 (UPI) — President Donald Trump turned his first post-COVID public appearance into a campaign rally on the White House South Lawn Saturday, nine days after was hospitalized for the coronavirus infection.

Thanking supporters for prayers and well wishes for himself and the first lady, within minutes Trump had referred to his Democratic presidential opponent as “Sleepy Joe Biden,” had boasted about the border wall and delivered other material typical of a campaign speech.

“We gotta vote these people into oblivion. Into oblivion. Gotta get rid of ’em. So bad for our country,” the president said.

About 400 people attended the invitation-only event. Trump called the event a peaceful protest for law and order and blamed the “radical Socialist Left” for civil unrest in U.S. cities this summer.

“Where there is evidence of wrongdoing by police, the criminal justice system must investigate and any perpetrators must be held accountable,” Trump said. “But we must never allow mob rule.”

Event organizers of Candace Owens’s BLEXIT Foundation paid for travel and lodging of some attendees and demanded that they wear matching shirts, ABC reported Saturday. Attendees were asked to wear masks, but were packed tightly together, not following social distancing guidelines.

Attendees were also scheduled to attend a pro-law enforcement rally in Washington, D.C.

The speech lasted about 18 minutes, much shorter than Trump’s usual campaign rally remarks, which can last more than an hour.

Trump, with flesh-colored bandages visible on his hands, downplayed his time at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and said he was returning to the campaign trail.

“I feel great,” he said. “We are starting very, very big with our rallies and with our everything,” Trump promised. The president has rallies planned in Florida, Pennsylvania and Iowa next week.

The speech ended with supporters chanting “four more years!” and Trump urging them to “get out and vote — and I love you.”

The president has not been seen in public other than in White House-released videos since his release from the hospital five days ago. The White House declined to say Saturday whether Trump was still potentially contagious from COVID-19 .

The last public event at the White House was the Sept. 26 Rose Garden ceremony to announce Supreme Court Justice candidate Amy Coney Barret’s nomination. Public health officials determined the gathering of more than 200 people was a “super-spreader” event which has been linked to dozens of COVID-19 infections, including those in Trump’s inner circle.

On Saturday, Trump campaign advisor and former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie announced he had been released from the hospital following treatment for the coronavirus.

Joe Biden’s campaign said Saturday that he had again tested negative for the virus. Biden’s campaign has been releasing regular updates since Biden appeared on the same Cleveland stage as Trump in a debate on Sept. 29.

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Trump’s first public address since COVID-19 diagnosis had hallmarks of a campaign event at the White House

President Trump’s first public appearance since he announced his COVID-19 diagnosis appeared to be an unofficial rally at the White House. On Saturday, Mr. Trump addressed hundreds of supporters closely gathered and dressed in Trump campaign gear, repeating unfounded claims of election fraud, attacking Democratic leaders, and falsely claiming that Joe Biden is a socialist. 

White House spokesman Judd Deere said the event was an “official” event, and “the campaign is not involved in this.” Anyone in attendance was invited by the White House, Deere said.

While using the White House for a partisan political event is a violation of the Hatch Act, Deere insisted Saturday’s event had “no Hatch Act implications” because it was run by the White House and not the campaign. 

The Hatch Act does not apply to the president or vice president, but does apply to any other executive branch officials who are involved. The president has been accused of repeatedly ignoring the act, most recently during the Republican National Convention. 

“This is another example I think of the myriad ways in which Donald Trump breaks the rules, and over time, people stop getting agitated about it because he breaks the rules all the time,” Washington Post national correspondent Philip Bump told CBSN’s Lana Zak following the event. “Essentially, he is using taxpayer money to bolster his campaign.” 

The address was made from the balcony overlooking the South Lawn, where Candace Owens’ BLEXIT Foundation was hosting a pro-police rally. Mr. Trump specifically addressed the crowd, telling them their shirts are “beautiful” and that he wants to “put one of them on instead of this white shirt.”

“We have to have law and order,” Mr. Trump said. “I want to thank the BLEXIT Foundation for organizing this event, and especially your two founders, two friends of mine, great people Candace Owens and former Tucson police officer Brandon Tatum. Great job, what a great job. … Thank you very much for being here.” 

Owens tweeted on Saturday that the foundation helped pay for some attendees to travel to Washington, D.C. 

The address was listed on the official White House schedule as “remarks at a peaceful protest for law & order.” 

Virginia Representative Don Beyer, a Democrat, immediately criticized the president for the event, tweeting, “As Trump again uses the White House for a campaign speech, doubtless with the illegal use of taxpayer resources and funds, the Republican National Convention remains under investigation for Hatch Act violations.”

President Trump Delivers Speech To Supporters From White House Balcony
WASHINGTON, DC – OCTOBER 10: Supporters cheer as they wait for U.S. President Donald Trump to address a rally in support of law and order on the South Lawn of the White House on October 10, 2020 in Washington, DC. President Trump invited over two thousand guests to hear him speak just a week after he was hospitalized for COVID-19.

Samuel Corum / Getty Images


During the event, Mr. Trump continuously remarked on the election, telling attendees that “we got to vote these people into oblivion.” 

“Democrats have run nearly every

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Trump restarting campaign with White House, Florida events

WASHINGTON (AP) — Looking to shove his campaign back on track, President Donald Trump and his team laid out an aggressive return to political activities, including a big White House event on Saturday and a rally in Florida on Monday, a week after his hospitalization for a virus that has killed more than 210,000 Americans.

As questions linger about his health — and Democratic opponent Joe Biden steps up his own campaigning — Trump planned to leave the Washington area for the first time since he was hospitalized. He is also increasing his radio and TV appearances with conservative interviewers, hoping to make up for lost time with just over three weeks until Election Day and millions already voting.

The president has not been seen in public — other than in White House-produced videos — since his return days ago from the military hospital where he received experimental treatments for the coronavirus.

Two weeks after his Rose Garden event that has been labeled a “superspreader” for the virus, Trump is planning to convene another large crowd outside the White House on Saturday for what his administration calls “a peaceful protest for law & order.” More than two dozen people linked to the White House have contracted COVID-19 since the president’s Sept. 26 event announcing Judge Amy Coney Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court.

Trump will address the Saturday group, expected to be at least several hundred supporters, from the White House balcony. All attendees are required to bring masks or will be provided with them, and also will be given temperature checks and asked to fill out a brief questionnaire. Attendees will be strongly encouraged to follow CDC guidelines, which include mask-wearing and social distancing.

Trump’s Monday rally in Sanford, Florida, was originally scheduled to be held on Oct. 2, the day after he tested positive.


Announcement of the new event came as Dr. Anthony Fauci, the government’s top infectious-disease expert, cautioned the White House again to avoid large-scale gatherings of people without masks.

He said of the Barrett event in an interview with The Associated Press, “I was not surprised to see a superspreader event given the circumstances.” That means “crowded, congregate setting, not wearing masks. It is not surprising to see an outbreak,” he said.

District of Columbia virus restrictions prohibit outdoor gatherings larger than 50 people, although that rule has not been strictly enforced. Masks are mandatory outdoors for most people, but the regulations don’t apply on federal land, and the Trump White House has openly flouted them for months.

And next week in Florida? Trump tweeted on Friday that he would be in Sanford “for a very BIG RALLY!”

Meanwhile, next Thursday’s town hall-style Trump-Biden debate was officially canceled, a few days after Trump backed away when the sponsoring commission switched it from face-to-face to virtual following Trump’s COVID-19 diagnosis.

Trump said the Commission on Presidential Debates was protecting Biden from having to take on the president in person. But Biden’s team said the

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Trump itching to get back to campaign trail, but he and White House evasive on health questions

Trump said he would be tested Friday.

During a friendly Thursday night interview with a political ally, Fox News commentator Sean Hannity, Trump ignored questions about whether he had been tested recently or had tested negative for COVID-19.

PHOTO: President Donald Trump gestures on the South Portico after returning to the White House from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Oct. 5, 2020, in Washington.

President Donald Trump gestures on the South Portico after returning to the White House from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Oct. 5, 2020, in Washington.

President Donald Trump gestures on the South Portico after returning to the White House from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Oct. 5, 2020, in Washington.

“Well, what we’re doing is, probably the test will be tomorrow, the actual test, because there’s no reason to test all the time,” Trump said, referring to Friday. “But they found very little infection or virus, if any. I don’t know if they found any, I didn’t go into it greatly with the doctors.”

The president said during the same interview that he hoped to get back out on the campaign trail as soon as Saturday and Sunday — he floated Florida and Pennsylvania as possibly locales for rallies.

But on Friday morning, White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany indicated that Trump might not actually travel as soon as Saturday.

“Logistically whether tomorrow is possible, it would be tough, it would be a decision for the campaign,” she said during an interview with Fox News.

The president’s physician, Dr. Sean Conley, said in a memorandum released by the White House late Thursday that he anticipated Trump could make a “safe return to public engagements” as soon as Saturday, which he said would mark “day 10” since Trump was diagnosed with the coronavirus.

He did not say how the White House would determine the president was no longer contagious, and when McEnany was asked, she deferred to Trump’s doctors.

On Thursday night, Trump paused his interview with Hannity twice to clear his throat, apparently coughing, a potential symptom of the coronavirus.

On Friday afternoon, he dismissed any concerns. “There’s always that lingering thing for a couple of days,” Trump told another ally, Rush Limbaugh, during a radio interview billed as a “radio rally.” “It’s called the lingering thing.”

PHOTO: President Donald Trump arrives for a campaign rally at Pittsburgh International Airport in Moon Township, Penn., Sept. 22, 2020.

President Donald Trump arrives for a campaign rally at Pittsburgh International Airport in Moon Township,

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Trump Maps Return to Campaign Trail After White House Says COVID-19 Treatment Complete | Top News

By Jeff Mason and Steve Holland

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Republican President Donald Trump on Friday prepared to return to the campaign trail with a pair of weekend rallies after his COVID-19 diagnosis sidelined him for a week in the race against Democratic nominee Joe Biden for the White House.

Trump, who announced he had been infected with the coronavirus on Oct. 2 and spent three nights in a military hospital receiving treatment, said late on Thursday he was feeling “really good” and, with a doctor’s blessing, aimed to campaign in Florida on Saturday and in Pennsylvania on Sunday.

Trump’s illness has kept him from crisscrossing the country to rally support and raise cash in the final weeks before the Nov. 3 election. A return to in-person events would be aimed at convincing voters he is healthy enough to campaign and to govern.

While Trump has released several videos on Twitter, he has not appeared in public since he returned home from the hospital on Monday. Biden has continued to campaign, with events scheduled on Friday in Las Vegas, Nevada.

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines say people who are severely ill with COVID-19 might need to stay home for up to 20 days after symptoms first appear.

Biden, who has sharply criticized Trump’s handling of the pandemic, is beating the Republican in national polls, though that lead is narrower in some of the swing states that may determine the election’s outcome.

White House physician Sean Conley said in a memo released on Thursday that Trump had completed his course of therapy for COVID-19, remained stable since returning home from the hospital and could resume public engagements on Saturday.

Sounding hoarse and occasionally pausing and clearing his throat, Trump told Fox News host Sean Hannity in an interview late on Thursday that he was likely to be tested for the virus on Friday. The White House has declined to say when Trump last tested negative.

“I feel so good,” Trump said.

The president is expected to host a “virtual rally” on Friday by appearing on conservative radio host Rush Limbaugh’s radio program.

The Trump and Biden campaigns sparred on Thursday over a televised debate that had been planned for next week. Trump pulled out after the nonpartisan commission in charge said the Oct. 15 event would be held virtually with the candidates in separate locations because of health and safety concerns after Trump contracted COVID-19. Biden’s campaign arranged a town hall-style event in Philadelphia instead.

Trump’s White House and campaign have experienced an outbreak of the virus in the last week, with multiple top aides, including the president’s press secretary and campaign manager, testing positive.

Trump and his staff have largely eschewed wearing masks, against the guidance of health professionals, and held rallies with thousands of people in indoor and outdoor venues despite recommendations against having events with large crowds.

Trump’s health will remain in the spotlight even if he begins holding events again.

(Reporting by Jeff Mason and

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Whitmer fires back after Trump campaign says she has ‘hatred’ for the president, claims White House knew about threats and didn’t help



Gretchen Whitmer looking at the camera: Michigan Office of the Governor via AP


© Michigan Office of the Governor via AP
Michigan Office of the Governor via AP

  • Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer said the Trump administration was aware of threats against her, and did nothing to reduce their attacks on her.
  • The FBI said it foiled a plot by six men to kidnap Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer and overthrow the state’s government.
  • Jason Miller, a senior advisor for President Donald Trump’s re-election campaign attacked Whitmer after she said Trump was responsible for not condemning white supremacists. 
  • Trump attacked Whitmer in a series of tweets on Thursday night. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer fired back after Jason Miller, a senior advisor for President Donald Trump’s re-election campaign, attacked her for reportedly hating Trump just hours after the FBI said it had stopped armed right-wing extremists who were plotting to kidnap her.

“If we want to talk about hatred, then Gov. Whitmer, go look in the mirror — the fact that she wakes up every day with such hatred in her heart for President Trump,” Miller said in a Fox News appearance.

Whitmer told CNN’s Erin Burnett that the administration was aware of threats made against her, and did nothing to reduce their attacks on her.

“I have raised this issue with them (Trump Admin)… I was aware of a lot of the threats being made against me and my family and I asked for their help. They didn’t do anything about it…Here we are. We are very close to a plot that was to kidnap me and to murder…” Whitmer said

Whitmer said that Miller’s attack “tells you everything you need to know about the character of the two people on this ballot that we have to choose from in a few weeks.”

“You know, the fact that after a plot to kidnap and to kill me, this is what they come out with. They start attacking me, as opposed to what good, decent people would do is to check-in and say, ‘Are you OK?’ — which is what Joe Biden did,” Whitmer told Burnett on “Out Front.”

Trump has repeatedly attacked the Democratic governor for her coronavirus response as well as her response to protests following the death of George Floyd.

He again attacked Whitmer on Twitter on Thursday.

“Governor Whitmer of Michigan has done a terrible job,” he tweeted Thursday night. “She locked down her state for everyone, except her husband’s boating activities. The Federal Government provided tremendous help to the Great People of Michigan.

“My Justice Department and Federal Law Enforcement announced…today that they foiled a dangerous plot against the Governor of Michigan. Rather than say thank you, she calls me a White Supremacist—while Biden and Democrats refuse to condemn Antifa, Anarchists, Looters and Mobs that burn down Democrat run cities…” Trump added.

“I do not tolerate ANY extreme violence,” he said in yet another tweet. “Defending ALL Americans, even those who oppose and attack

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