The Cambridge family join Sir David Attenborough for garden screening of A Life On Our Planet

From Good Housekeeping

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and their three children, Prince George, Princess Charlotte and Prince Louis, met up with Sir David Attenborough last week, as they all attended a very special outdoor screening.

The Cambridges and Sir David met up in the gardens of Kensington Palace to watch the environmentalist’s upcoming feature film, David Attenborough: A Life On Our Planet.

Alongside lovely photos taken at the outdoor event, the official @KensingtonPalace Instagram caption posted in the caption: “With a shared passion for protecting the natural world, they continue to support one another in their missions to tackle some of the biggest environmental challenges our planet faces.

“This includes working together on The @EarthshotPrize, the most prestigious global environment prize in history – further details of which will be shared in the coming weeks.”

The caption also revealed some lovely details about the meet-up, including the fact that Sir David gave Prince George a tooth from a giant shark, called a carcharocles megalodon or “big tooth”.

“Sir David found the tooth on a family holiday to Malta in the late 1960s, embedded in the island’s soft yellow limestone which was laid down during the Miocene period some 23 million years ago,” the caption explains. “Carcharocles is believed to have grown to 15 metres in length, which is about twice the length of the Great White, the largest shark alive today.”

We’re sure that Prince George loved looking at the tooth, as his happy smile in the second photo shared in the Instagram post proves!

The whole of the Cambridge clan, and Sir David for that matter, were wearing smart outfits in coordinating shades of blue for the occasion, with the TV veteran in a navy suit, Princes William and Louis in blue jumpers, George in a blue checked shirt, and Charlotte in cute blue shoes.

The Duchess of Cambridge looked stunning as usual, in a light blue denim shirt dress, which appears to be the Marley Belted style by designer brand Gabriella Hearst.

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The Kitchen Diva: Brussels sprouts shed their bad reputation | Cambridge News / Deerfield Independent

Long before Brussels sprouts became a trendy vegetable, my family, especially, my daughter, Deanna, were huge fans. My mother was raised on a farm and loved to grow all types of green vegetables. She was especially skilled with properly preparing Brussels sprouts and other typically stinky and slimy vegetables — I’m talking about you, cabbage and okra!

While Brussels sprouts have only recently become popular in America, sprouts have been a culinary mainstay in the southern Netherlands and Northern Europe since the 1600s. They may have been grown in Belgium as early as 1200, and are named for Brussels, its capital.

These tiny members of the cabbage and mustard family also have cancer-fighting phytochemicals, are high in vitamin C and are a reliable source of folate, vitamin A and potassium. Since Brussels sprouts are so good for you, why do so many people despise them?

In a web poll taken several years ago, more than 78,000 adults weighed in on the foods they hate. Brussels sprouts finished No. 8 on the list of most hated foods. The comments section overflowed with horror stories about being forced to eat the vegetable as a child.

One thing I noticed about the readers’ comments was that the Brussels sprouts they were served were muddy colored, overcooked and smelled bad. When Brussels sprouts are carefully selected, stored and cooked properly, they have a bright color, a crisp texture and a delicious flavor. When selecting the vegetable, look for small, young, vibrant green, tightly compacted sprouts.

Brussels sprouts are delicious boiled or steamed until tender, but still slightly crisp or roasted to bring out their natural sugars. Use sprouts that are all about the same size to ensure they will cook quickly and evenly. As a rule, Brussels sprouts cook in about 6 to 7 minutes. Be careful not to overcook Brussels sprouts because they will release sinigrin, a natural gas with a sulfur-like smell.

This recipe for Hashed Brussels Sprouts is flavorful and delicious. The quick cooking time and the addition of the garlic, onion and mustard complement the sprouts and showcase its flavors in a unique way. Try it, and you’re sure to become a Brussels sprouts lover, too!

HASHED BRUSSELS SPROUTS

1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice, plus 1 tablespoon grated lemon zest

1 pound Brussels sprouts

1 tablespoon olive oil

2 tablespoons butter

1/2 medium purple onion, minced

1 garlic clove, minced

1 tablespoon Italian seasoning

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon pepper

2 tablespoons vegetable broth or low-sodium chicken broth

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1/2 teaspoon honey or sugar

1. Using a large bowl, pour in the lemon juice. Cut bottoms off the sprouts, and discard. Halve sprouts lengthwise. Thinly slice sprouts, cutting around and discarding the firm core. Immediately toss sprout slices with lemon juice to separate leaves and retain color.

2. Heat oil and butter over high heat in a skillet large enough to hold all the sprouts. When oil mixture is hot, but not smoking, add the sprouts,

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Modest terraced house in Cambridge Grade II listed for interior designs | Anglia

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David Parr is not a famous name in Cambridge.

But in the late 1800s when he got home from working as a decorative artist in grand houses and churches he used the same skills and techniques to spruce up the walls of his own modest terraced house.

David Parr’s house given Grade II listing Credit: ITV Anglia

It’s now been turned into a museum and has just been given Grade II listed status in recognition of the rarity of the interior designs preserved on its walls.

It gives us a recognition and a quality stamp which will enable us to access funding in the future

Shelley Lockwood, David Parr House

The designs survived because the house was later lived in by his grand-daughter Elsie Palmer, who died in 2013.

A charity was then set up to buy and restore it and David Parr House opened as a museum last year.

Like all musuems and attractions it’s been impacted by the Covid-19 restrictions, but its also just received a grant of over £40,000 from Historic England to help them offer a virtual tour of the building.

We were fully booked at the begining of the year and have been looking for alternative ways for people to experience the house

Charlotte Woodley, David Parr House

David Parr didn’t get much recognition for his day job, but his name lives on through the preservation of his home where he spent decades creating his designs in his spare time.

David Parr’s former home given Grade II listing Credit: ITV Anglia

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