Kitchen of the Week: ‘Cafe au lait’ project features massive stone island

Designed to look like a massive block of stone, the "Café au lait" kitchen by Milvia Hannah is the centrepiece of the family living area in a new home in Canterbury.

SUPPLIED

Designed to look like a massive block of stone, the “Café au lait” kitchen by Milvia Hannah is the centrepiece of the family living area in a new home in Canterbury.

A large stone island forms the striking centrepiece of this kitchen in a Canterbury home – it’s coffee-coloured veining giving rise to the name of the project.

“Café au lait”, by Wellington kitchen designer Milvia Hannah of German Kitchens, reflects the owners’ designer for an “organic” kitchen featuring natural materials and colours.

The kitchen, which won a regional award in this year’s national NKBA Kitchen & Bathroom Awards, has also been shortlisted for the prestigious SBID International Design Excellence Awards in London – the winners will be announced later this month.

Milvia Hannah of German Kitchens has won numerous design awards.

SUPPLIED

Milvia Hannah of German Kitchens has won numerous design awards.

It caught the NKBA judges’ attention for both its looks and craftsmanship: “The manufacturing of the exquisite marble island would have been tricky, but it has been well executed,” the judges said. “The combination of materials works really well together. Appliance placement is good, and the lighting adds to the kitchen.”

READ MORE:
* Kitchen of the Week: Former barrister chambers becomes apartment with award-winning black kitchen
* Kitchen of the Week: Couple moving out of carvavan into first home had kitchen budget less than $25k
* Kiwi kitchens and bathrooms wow on the world stage in 2020

Hannah says the kitchen was designed for the clients’ new house, where it needed to complement an elegant, open-plan interior, in a cohesive way.

Recessed seating at one end cannot be seen from the front of the island - it was designed this way to maintain the sense of the island being a large block of stone.

SUPPLIED

Recessed seating at one end cannot be seen from the front of the island – it was designed this way to maintain the sense of the island being a large block of stone.

The main feature of the Eggersmann German kitchen, was to be the island, and Hannah says it needed to look good when viewed from all angles. It also had to be ergonomic, with a strong organic aesthetic.

To this end, hand-picked natural stone was selected for the island benchtops, drawer fronts, side panels, recessed handles, plinths and integrated sink.

“This allowed the island to feature as a block of stone, keeping the uniformity of the texture and veining through all aspects of the design,” Hannah says.

Bold Italian lighting was chosen to reinforce the visual drama.

SUPPLIED

Bold Italian lighting was chosen to reinforce the visual drama.

The island features numerous drawers for storage and vast bench spaces making it well suited to entertaining.

“There is a recessed seating area for two at the end,” says Hannah. “But the front face of the island hides this from view to create balance, symmetry and harmony. False panels were created to achieve this look.”

Matt natural stone with an organic structure was selected for the island, with a muted soft matt stone benchtop chosen for the other side. This was complemented by rough-sawn timber veneer for the cabinetry in a colour that was found in the natural stone.

Cabinetry along the rear wall of the kitchen features rough-sawn timber veneer.

SUPPLIED

Cabinetry along the rear wall of the kitchen features rough-sawn timber veneer.

NKBA judges praised the craftsmanship of the island. Doors and drawers feature recessed pulls.

SUPPLIED

Read more

L.A. Angels star Albert Pujols, wife start new cafe concept that helps equip adults from vulnerable situations with vocational training, life skills

COSTA MESA (KABC) — The Los Angeles Angels missed the playoffs this year but Albert Pujols and his wife, Diedre, are keeping busy. The couple launched Open Gate Kitchen, a new cafe concept fueling social good, which equips adults from vulnerable life situations with vocational training and life skills.

Fernando Escobar is now head cook and manager of the restaurant; but a few years ago, he didn’t know where his next meal would come from. Open Gate International helped turn his life around through culinary school.

“My life was in the place of darkness and addicted to meth and alcohol and I ended up in the streets homeless,” said Escobar.

Making food takes Escobar back to days in the kitchen with his mother; Christmas with his family. It now gives him a feeling of empowerment.

“To be a part of something that could possibly help another single parent out there and another single dad to be able to get back on their feet and to provide for their kids is such a humbling experience,” said Escobar.

Diedre Pujols is the founder of the non-profit Open Gate Kitchen. The Costa Mesa restaurant offers life coaching, culinary training and job placement programs to people like Escobar.

“I couldn’t be more proud,” said Diedre.

The mission is a personal one for Pujols. Her own past struggles with addiction and bad choices help her connect with the students here.

“At 19, I didn’t even want to live anymore and so I feel like there’s a way that I can identify with a lot of these individuals who come in,” said Diedre.

Her husband, L.A. Angels first baseman, Albert Pujols, says he worked hard for his own dreams, and he’s helping his wife do the same for their community.

“Their teachers, they get the best of their students, you know, and I think, on the other side, the students put in really hard work, day in and day out, because they know that this is an opportunity or a chance and they don’t want to pass on it,” said Albert.

“Here I am you know, catering for the Los Angeles Angels and all these important people, it’s such a blessing. It is,” said Escobar.

Open Gate Kitchen is now open for dine-in, delivery and take-out options, serving up handcrafted healthy, fresh, cuisine with an international flair.

Copyright © 2020 KABC-TV. All Rights Reserved.

Source Article

Read more

Cafe slapped with a whopping fine after inspection found the kitchen was dirty and gross

Swanky cafe is slapped with a whopping fine after routine inspection found the kitchen looked like THIS

  • An inspector was completing an audit of a cafe and bakery in Brisbane
  • The cafe’s director and part-owner failed to carry out pest control in July 2018
  • Inspectors found unidentifiable matter in a drain, on bread pans and on the floor 

A trendy cafe has been slapped with a hefty fine after a routine inspection found the kitchen in a shocking state. 

The eatery in Brisbane’s north-east was hit with a $13,000 fine for failing to comply with the Food Act following a routine audit in July 2018. 

Brisbane City Council barrister Greg McGuire told the Magistrates Court cockroaches was found throughout the premises, the Courier Mail reported.

A fancy cafe has been slapped with a hefty fine after a routine inspection found the kitchen was so dirty it was rife with cockroaches

It was rife with cockroaches

A fancy cafe and bakery has been slapped with a hefty fine after a routine inspection found the kitchen was so dirty it was rife with cockroaches 

Inspectors found the cafe’s director and part-owner had failed to carry out pest control after noticing the insects two days earlier.

They also found unidentifiable matter in a drain as well as in bread pans, on the floor and walls in parts of the premises.

When confronted one of the part-owners they said ‘we don’t take them very lightly at all, because we deal with people’s lives.’

He claimed to have already booked in pest control for the next day, and admitted the situation was ‘unbelievably unacceptable’. 

In Brisbane Magistrates Court on Thursday, the part-owner pleaded guilty to four counts each of failing to comply with the Food Act.  

They also found unidentifiable matter in a drain as well as in bread pans and on the floor and walls in parts of the premises

They also found unidentifiable matter in a drain as well as in bread pans and on the floor and walls in parts of the premises

When confronted,a part-owner said 'we don't take them very lightly at all, because we deal with people's lives'

When confronted,a part-owner said ‘we don’t take them very lightly at all, because we deal with people’s lives’

Inspectors suspended the cafe’s food licence before reinstating it the following day after they fixed the issues.

Barrister Michael Henry told the court the owners contacted a pest controller on the day the cockroaches were found, but the pest company couldn’t visit the cafe immediately.

The business had paid pest control to be carried out monthly rather than quarterly as recommended by exterminators. 

Magistrate Colin Strofield fined the owner $2000 and no conviction was recorded. 

Advertisement

Source Article

Read more

Can’t Travel to Paris? Bistro Chairs Bring Cafe Culture to Your Kitchen

OF ALL the morning rituals that take place in Paris, my favorite is the transformation of those whimsical, colorfully woven chairs from towering stacks to orderly rows outside the city’s brasseries, cafés and bistros. Sinewy but delicate, masculine but feminine, rational but romantic, they have always felt to me like little ambassadors, exhilarating indicators that I am truly in the city.

When bistro seating recently began showing up in American shelter magazines and friends’ houses as indoor furniture, I became fixated on owning some. They would ballast my sunny, modern Los Angeles breakfast nook. “They’re a great way to add interest to a space without introducing anything too precious,” said Dina Holland, an interior designer in Needham, Mass.

I’ve been all but unable to stop thinking about Paris since Covid made it inaccessible. So when I stumbled upon a pair of bistro stools for $94 in the clearance section of a local Target, I ignored their lack of provenance and lunged at them the way some women throw themselves to catch a bride’s bouquet. Hoping the seats would inspire the kind of languid, all-day conversations they seem to in Paris, I soon realized I had purchased the equivalent of off-brand soda. Their hollow, aluminum frames look hastily painted to resemble rattan, and the uninspired checkerboard pattern ends abruptly on two sides, leaving conspicuous bald spots.

I found comfort in the website of Maison Drucker. Although bistro chairs are available in myriad iterations from major online retailers to small boutiques, Drucker, located just outside Paris, has been making chairs for the city’s most famous restaurants since 1885. Among their clients are rival eateries Les Deux Magots and Café de Flore. The former commissioned a pine green and ivory chair in a clean basket weave, the latter, an intricate pattern of triangles in pine and burgundy. Both signature chairs have been used for more than 40 years. Constructed primarily of bent rattan, their seats and backs woven either of a synthetic called Raucord or of Rilsan, a natural fiber derived from castor oil, these are the perches of Sartre, de Beauvoir and Hemingway.

Drucker, however, does not recreate exact replicas of any chairs specific to a restaurant or hotel client. As Diego Dubois, the company’s vice president, diplomatically explained, “We have dozens of people, each trying to order the Flore or Le Roch hotel chairs, and each time we unfortunately have to decline.”

Source Article

Read more

Kitchen fire breaks out at historic Rugby cafe, food service still planned for Labor Day weekend

Staff with the Harrow Road Cafe will still have food available for take-out or to eat outside over the Labor Day weekend, next door to the cafe.

RUGBY, Tenn. — A kitchen fire broke out at Harrow Road Cafe in Rugby early Friday morning, gutting the building according to officials.

An image of the building was posted on Historic Rugby’s Facebook page, with chunks of the roof missing and white smoke still rising. However, the staff also said that a fire wouldn’t keep them from feeding people over the Labor Day weekend.

Officials said staff will set up next door to the cafe to offer food services Sept. 5 – 7, between 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. Take-out, picnic tables and other kinds of food services will be available, officials said.

The cafe has been open since 1882, when a group first opened the shop, according to Historic Rugby’s website. Lunch service is still available at R.M. Brooks Store every day except Sunday, officials said.



Enough with work already! Spend your Labor Day with us this Monday. … The Visitor Centre, Harrow Road Cafe, Commissary, Print Shop & more will all be open. Stroll one of our trails or get wet at the Gentemen’s Swimming Hole. See you here!

RELATED: How to customize the stories and alerts you get from WBIR

RELATED: Take 10! Sign up for the WBIR lunchtime newsletter

Source Article

Read more