Buying Guide: This olive oil sprayer is the perfect kitchen companion | Home & Garden



Oil Sprayer

(AMAZON)

We hope you enjoy the products we recommend. We may receive a commission if you purchase a product mentioned in this article.


If you’re trying to cook healthier meals at home, you’re probably already stocked with olive oil. But this healthy fat, popular in the Mediterranean diet, is only healthy in moderation—and it can be hard to tell just how much you need when pouring straight from the bottle. That’s where this oil sprayer comes in.

An Even Coat for Even Cooking

Whether you’re roasting, air frying, or baking your meal, this oil sprayer allows you to evenly coat meat or vegetables with a thin layer for a crispy finish without unnecessary calories. The simple pumping action provides a fine mist and keeps your hands clean and free from messy oil while you cook.

It’s Not Just for Olive Oil

This olive oil mister is so handy that you might need two—one for cooking and another for topping off your dishes with salad dressing, soy sauce, or lemon juice. It also handles other healthy oils including sunflower and avocado oil.

Why Customers Love It

With more than 1,400 reviews, this olive oil sprayer is maintaining an outstanding 4.9 out of 5-star average rating on Amazon. Customers love this sprayer for air frying their meals while avoiding excess oil. They also liked that the oil came out in a fine mist rather than a heavy spray. Customers loved this as an alternative to disposable cooking spray bottles since it cut down on waste and cost. At under $10, this was also the perfect housewarming or thank you gift for foodies.

Source Article

Read more

Buying a Home You’ve Only Seen Online: What You Need to Know

Not only can you buy a house you’ve only seen online, as a real estate investor, you might prefer to do so, at least once you have a system in place. Buying homes online has actually been a strategy for people buying investment property for some time, particularly if said investment property is in an area not local to the investor. And with the coronavirus on the scene, more people have adopted the process as they have become used to doing business virtually, plus not physically going into homes addresses safety concerns.

Buying a home online can speed up the acquisition process, saving you time to plan your next investment opportunity. Here’s what you need to know.

Set parameters for searching

Determine the niche you want to market to for this investment property. This includes price range, home size, location, and any other parameters you deem important.

For example, your niche could be a three-bedroom, two-bathroom home under $200,000 located near a college or university so you can rent to students.

Note that although having some parameters is good to narrow down your market, having too many will make it harder to find the right deal. So limit your parameters to make it easier for yourself.

Check out the neighborhood — virtually

With online house shopping, you probably won’t be familiar with the neighborhoods. But you can find out all the information you’ll need — you guessed it — through online searches. You can get employment data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, income ranges from Sperling’s Best Places, school ratings from Great Schools, and crime statistics from AreaVibes, all from the comfort of your own computer.

Learn to analyze the property

As with any investment property, whether you’re buying remotely or in person, you need to analyze it to help determine whether it will be a moneymaker for you. There are many formulas for rental properties to determine this. The fastest one investors use is the 1% rule, meaning you should be able to make 1% of the home’s price in monthly rent to make the deal worthwhile. So for that $200,000 property, you’ll want to get as close to $2,000 a month as possible.

If you have a favorite method of running the numbers, use it for your online deals just as you would with any other deal. You can determine what the property will likely fetch in rent by conducting an online search to see what similar area homes are renting for.

Determine what you’ll offer

This step is the same as an offline deal as well. Investors routinely offer less than asking price, but doing so remotely presents more of a challenge if you don’t know the local market and conditions: Is it a buyer’s or seller’s market there? It’s important to find this out so you’ll know how much less to offer and still get the deal. A real estate agent will be a great help with this step.

Put the home under contract

Again,

Read more

Not all online banks offer wire transfers, can complicate home buying

Personal Finance Insider writes about products, strategies, and tips to help you make smart decisions with your money. We may receive a small commission from our partners, like American Express, but our reporting and recommendations are always independent and objective.

  • On the morning I was supposed to close on my first home, I found out that the online bank where I’d saved my down payment didn’t offer outgoing wire transfers.
  • Because I didn’t have access to wires to transfer money instantly, I couldn’t get my cash to the title company that day, and it meant pushing back my closing. 
  • It turns out that my bank isn’t an outlier — many popular online banks don’t offer outgoing wire transfer services, which could be a big problem for home buyers.
  • If you’re using an online bank to save for your down payment, plan ahead. Make sure you can make a wire transfer, or make a plan in advance to move your down payment to a bank that can.
  • Sign up for Personal Finance Insider’s email newsletter here »

When I started thinking about buying a home, I opened a high-yield savings account to save for it, and I chose an online bank. 

About a year later, I found the house I was looking for, made an offer on it, had that offer accepted, and set up a date for the closing.

The morning of the planned closing, I intended to wire the money to the title company — a pretty typical part of home buying, and required in my state for an amount of money the size of a down payment. I had the information I needed to send it, and I pulled up my account to get the wire started.

But, I couldn’t find a way to do it on my online bank’s website. After some looking, one line on the bank’s frequently asked questions page stopped both me and my closing agent in our tracks: ‘Outgoing wire transfers are not available.’

I called the bank, but the only other solutions took days

I’d never even thought about needing to make a wire transfer before my home purchase. I didn’t think I needed to look in advance to make sure the bank offered them, either —I just assumed all banks did. But, you know what they say about assumptions. 

I was panicked. I called the customer service line. One representative said the best he could do would be to mail me a paper check. This was Wednesday, and the earliest that check would arrive would be Saturday. It would mean pushing my closing until the next week, and moving my move-in date to the next weekend. There had to be a better way. 

Another call to the online bank later in the day had me talking to a different customer service representative; he had another idea. He could increase my daily transfer limits to $20,000, the set up ACH transfers to move the full balance to my checking account over three

Read more

Renters reveal garden, double glazing and fast broadband are must haves for buying first home

Renters have revealed the must-have features for their first owned home – with a garden and high-speed broadband topping the list, research has revealed.

A survey of 1,000 tenants revealed they would happily move up to 20 miles if it meant they could get onto the property ladder.

A survey of 1,000 tenants revealed they would happily move up to 20 miles

1

A survey of 1,000 tenants revealed they would happily move up to 20 miles Credit: Alamy

But before putting down their deposit, they would want to find a home with an allocated parking space, separate toilet, en-suite bathroom and a new boiler.

And 12 per cent said they would like a home office – a sign of how society has changed over the past six months.

However, while 81 per cent of those surveyed aspire to own their home, 68 per cent fear they’ll never be able to afford to.

The research, commissioned as part of Shared Ownership Week which aims to help people with smaller budgets get on the property ladder, revealed the average tenant has been renting for 10 years and has more than £13,000 saved towards a deposit.

A spokesperson for Shared Ownership Week said: “The situation this year has changed our outlook on life and with people spending more time at home.

“As a result, it seems things like high speed broadband and an outdoor space are now among the most important features.

The survey of tenants who live in London and the south east also found that a detached home just pipped an apartment to the most desirable type of property, with two bedrooms the optimal figure for most.

Location is the most important factor when looking at a first home, followed by affordability and size.

But 62 per cent would compromise on the location if it meant being able to own a home, while 60 per cent would settle for a smaller property than they’d really like.

It also emerged just 28 per cent of the respondents knew if they were eligible for a shared ownership property, which typically involves buying a 25 per cent share of a new build.

And in a separate nationwide study of 1,000 Brits, carried out via OnePoll, almost three quarters (73 per cent) said they had heard of shared ownership.

But only six in 10 (61 per cent) think everyone should aspire to own their own home, with 47 per cent believing renters should be encouraged to buy a property under

Read more

Buying Guide: This snap on pasta strainer will be your new favorite kitchen gadget | Home-and-garden

Regular colanders do their job just fine. They strain out water from pasta or remove extra sauce from stir fried dishes. But sometimes a better mousetrap comes along—and that’s where this snap on strainer from Kitchen Gizmo comes in.

How It Works

This silicone colander from Kitchen Gizmo snaps on to most standard sized pots and pans so you can simply tip and pour out excess liquid into the sink. The compact design is perfect for working with limited counter space, and unlike traditional strainers, this silicone colander can be folded or rolled up for more compact storage.

Safe and Durable

When it comes to anything that’s touching your food, safety is the most important. This silicone pasta strainer is completely BPA-free, and the high-quality material will withstand heavy foods and hot temperatures. It’s also easy to clean since it’s dishwasher safe.

Why Customers Love It

Amazon customers love this silicone clip-on colander from Kitchen Gizmo giving it an average rating of 4.5 stars with more than 1,000 reviews. Customers loved that the strainer kept steam away from their hands while they poured out extra water and that very little food stuck to the silicone. One customer even mentioned that they threw away their traditional strainers once they had this clip-on strainer.

Kitchen Gizmo Snap N Strain Strainer available from Amazon

fbq('init', '1423991677718907'); fbq('track', 'PageView'); fbq('track', 'CompleteRegistration');

Source Article

Read more

Buying Guide: This snap on pasta strainer will be your new favorite kitchen gadget | Home & Garden

Regular colanders do their job just fine. They strain out water from pasta or remove extra sauce from stir fried dishes. But sometimes a better mousetrap comes along—and that’s where this snap on strainer from Kitchen Gizmo comes in.

This silicone colander from Kitchen Gizmo snaps on to most standard sized pots and pans so you can simply tip and pour out excess liquid into the sink. The compact design is perfect for working with limited counter space, and unlike traditional strainers, this silicone colander can be folded or rolled up for more compact storage.

When it comes to anything that’s touching your food, safety is the most important. This silicone pasta strainer is completely BPA-free, and the high-quality material will withstand heavy foods and hot temperatures. It’s also easy to clean since it’s dishwasher safe.

Amazon customers love this silicone clip-on colander from Kitchen Gizmo giving it an average rating of 4.5 stars with more than 1,000 reviews. Customers loved that the strainer kept steam away from their hands while they poured out extra water and that very little food stuck to the silicone. One customer even mentioned that they threw away their traditional strainers once they had this clip-on strainer.

Source Article

Read more

What is shared ownership? How the home buying scheme works

The shared ownership scheme has been extended. Photo: Reuters/Neil Hall
The shared ownership scheme has been extended. Photo: Reuters/Neil Hall

The UK government has announced a shakeup of the shared ownership scheme in England, in a drive to help more households buy their own homes.

Plans unveiled on Tuesday will see more first-time buyers and social housing tenants able to part-buy their homes, as well as a wave of new homes, with some properties available for shared ownership.

The changes affect shared ownership in England, with different rules in Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland as housing policy is devolved.

What is shared ownership?

Shared ownership schemes involve buying a share of a property with a mortgage or lump sum, and paying rent for the rest to the owner of the remaining share.

Most shared ownership homes are part-owned by housing associations, but some councils and private developers also run similar schemes.

Around 157,000 households are reported to live in shared ownership homes in England, representing less than 1% of all households.

How is shared ownership changing?

Buyers have to be able to afford at least 25% of a home to be eligible for the scheme in England. The government now plans to reduce the minimum stake to 10%, as the current rules mean even part-ownership remains unaffordable for many households.

Other changes should make it easier for current part-owners to buy more of their homes, in a process known as “staircasing.”

READ MORE: Government spends £12.2bn on up to 180,000 new homes in England

They will be able to buy additional shares in 1% instalments, rather than 10%, and fees will be cut.

New shared owners will also see the landlord cover the cost of repairs and maintenance for the first 10 years.

What are the pros of shared ownership?

Such part-buy, part-rent arrangements make it easier for people to get on the housing ladder, as the deposit and mortgage payments needed are much lower than a standard purchase with a mortgage.

The buyer’s payments every month will include rent and interest fees if they buy with a repayment mortgage, but they will also include repaying the loan—gradually building up their stake in the property. This stake can be increased further by buying additional shares.

READ MORE: Britain warned it’s heading towards a housing bubble

Properties are leasehold so may require the freeholder’s consent for alterations, but buyers are more likely to be able to renovate and make their homes their own than renters.

What are the cons?

Research by House of Commons staff earlier this year noted shared ownership is complex for buyers, lenders and providers to understand.

It also said mortgage availability is “limited,” increasing a part-owner’s stake is costly, and re-sale can be difficult.

Housing charity Shelter says the UK government should prioritise building genuinely affordable social housing, warning many renters have no savings and cannot afford even part-ownership.

Who can apply for shared ownership?

The government rules mean shared ownership is available only for households with a total income under £80,000 a year, or

Read more

Buying Tree House Plans

Learning to construct your own Tree House on a beautiful summer weekend can become a very educational woodworking project for you and the bored kids. But before you try buying Tree House Plans there are a few very important things to take into consideration. Making sure that you have the support of your family is always a first. Then choosing your design or plan so you can create an average time line is essential. This article will try to summarize the basics everyone should know before attempting any beginner or advanced level Tree House woodworking projects. Hopefully this makes constructing your new Tree House or Playhouse a lot easier for you and your loved ones.

The first thing to be done before even choosing your template or blueprint is making a decision on where to build the Tree House. Site selection will be an important part in choosing the design that can be built. Is there going to be proper room for the design choice? Anyone know the types of trees that should be used, the best size or shape? knowing such things can be a defining factor of what Tree House design might be chosen. This brings us to the next subject of which Tree House Plans are most convenient for all involved.

When we finally have made an educated guess on the area going to be used, we can choose the design or type that everyone is comfortable with constructing. After the design is chosen one can assess what equipment and the type of materials needed to accomplish the task at hand. Some greenhorns or novices might be too scared to use certain power tools which could result in a possible accident. So knowing the difficulty level of the project might also be a factor in the design choices.

A good example of the difference between a prebuilt set and a Do-It-Yourself one, is when my buddy purchased his and I built ours. After my buddy took two weekends to assemble the package he realized it was missing some crucial pieces to finish the job. He then tried to return the kit only to find out there were no more like it in storage and that his model was discontinued. Just to add fuel to the fire he then found out that the max load per child was very low. The one I built was easily customizable and could withstand all four of my kids. These are another couple of points to consider when learning how to construct your own Tree House.

Finally with all these other steps done, the cost can be calculated and checked to see if it is within the budget. Knowing what tools are needed and if they are available or have to be bought can also be a factor. What type of materials are going to be incorporated is another issue in the price. But if anyone was to compare the difference in price between a store bought prefabricated playhouse package and a …

Read more

What Factors Should You Consider When Buying Bathroom Sinks?

Many of us have been in that situation when you are moving into a new home, or perhaps renovating an existing home, and you need to buy a new bathroom sink. You might not be sure about the types of bathroom sinks available, or what is important to consider when buying bathroom sinks. In this article, we will consider some of the factors you should take into consideration, as well as briefly discussing some of the other factors you should think about before buying a sink.

One of the most important factors to consider is space – what are your special restrictions when buying and fitting a new sink. There is no point choosing your dream bathroom sink, only to find that it does not fit in, or alternatively that it looks too small within your bathroom. Think about the design of the room – will the bathroom sink go in the corner of the room, or do you want it to be the centrepiece of the room.

You should also consider the style of the bathroom, and the style of the sink which you would like to put in. Many people are fans of a glass sink, which can look extremely classy in the right bathroom, but look out of place in a differently styled bathroom. Do you wish to go for a contemporary look, versus a functional look? Perhaps you are less concerned about style, and more about the cheapest, viable option. All of these factors are important, and you should pick the right choice for your bathroom.

Nowadays, there are lots of different types of materials for bathroom sinks to be made out of. We briefly mentioned glass sinks above, but you can also buy your sink in a number of other different materials. Other different types of materials include marble or metal sinks, although by far the most popular material for sinks is vitreous china. The main reason for this is that these bathroom sinks tend to be the most durable, as well as being much easier to clean. When you consider how many times a day that a bathroom sink is used, this is one of the primary reasons for the popularity of vitreous china.

In terms of the different types or styles, of bathroom sinks that you can purchase, there are a wide variety of sinks. These include pedestal, countertop, wall mounted, corner, inset, semi-recessed, space saving / en-suite or undercounter basins. Always remember that your choice is a personal decision, based on your tastes and the space in which you have to work with.

Before you make the decision which sink to buy, you should also consider other factors such as installation. Whether you will be able to install your own sink will depend on your own DIY skills. Some bathroom sink companies will include installation in their prices, whereas others will not. In this case, if you are not experienced at DIY, you may be best advised to hire a plumber to …

Read more

How to Speak With a Seller When Buying a House

Having a serious conversation with another human being is not necessarily easy, especially if you don't already know the other person. This can be especially difficult if you're used to working alone in a closed environment like an office or factory. And the ultimate difficulty comes when you're not confident about your side of the conversation.

Which leads me to the question at hand: how do you speak with a seller when you're trying to buy their house?

What's the "pitch" ?, I've been asked.

Let me start out by assuring you that you're not trying to create a sales pitch, at all. In fact, this isn't about selling anything – it's really about creating a relationship. It's about listening. It's important that you talk honestly with the seller, not about yourself, but about them.

People buy from people they like. People sell to people they like.

Following are some negotiation key points:

1. Speak with the owner. The first thing you want to establish is that the person you are speaking with is the person selling the property. It's important to be communicating with the ultimate decider. You don't want to work your way to an agreement with the person who met you at the house only to find out that someone else is actually on the deed (the real seller) and does not agree with the terms that have been created .

2. Find out why the home is being sold. Selling a home is never about the house, it's about the situation the seller is in. There are as many reasons to sell as there are sellers – downsizing, job loss, transfer, illness, divorce, etc. The house is the result of the situation, not the cause.

3. Create a solution. You won't be their only solution, of course, but you do offer one. Once you have a relationship established, you talk numbers. What they want / need; what it is actually worth after repairs vs. what they think it will be worth; what repairs will cost.

4. Make the offer. What you can offer and why comes last.

And what you plan to do with the property after you purchase it is totally irrelevant to the seller – they just want to get their property sold – so don't start explaining why you're buying it. By the time you show up for your appointment, they should know you're not going to live in the property and that you intend to make your own profit, but they're not generally interested in our lives. Your focus needs to be on the seller, on their needs and their situation, so relax and plan to listen – a lot.

The negotiation is not a game. It is not a trick. You're not trying to "win" anything. You're helping sellers. You're having a conversation. Think about how you would want to be approached if you were selling.

And always remember, you're dealing with a person, not a property .

What have you …

Read more