‘A place to get away’: Huge water feature coming to Tulsa Botanic Garden | News

The water garden’s name comes from John and Mary Ann Bumgarner of the Bumgarner Family Charitable Foundation, which made the “major gift” to make the project possible.

At Wednesday’s announcement, John Bumgarner said he is excited to see the garden develop further and thrilled to forever be a part of it.

“This garden’s special to Tulsa,” Bumgarner said. “It’s growing, as most gardens do, and it’s expanding and it’s future is going to be very bright.

“It’s a good effort, a good project, and we’re most happy to support it.”

A spokeswoman for the Botanic Garden said that while the Bumgarners declined to announce the exact amount of their donation, the entire project cost is about $1.25 million.

To make the water garden, crews will raise the pool at the seven-acre lake’s north end 18 inches to create a waterfall at the southern end. Opposite this feature at the Sunrise Bridge, water will flow into the garden over natural rock with a view to the floating gardens on both sides of the pool.

Those floating gardens will include water-loving plants like iris and hibiscus while the lilies take up the standing water in between on the southern end. The walking path will take visitors past the overlooks on the pool’s eastern side, with each platform offering a closer view at the lilies and floating gardens below beneath the cypress trees’ shade.

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‘A place to get away’: Huge water feature coming to Tulsa Botanic Garden | Local News

The water garden’s name comes from John and Mary Ann Bumgarner of the Bumgarner Family Charitable Foundation, which made the “major gift” to make the project possible.

At Wednesday’s announcement, John Bumgarner said he is excited to see the garden develop further and thrilled to forever be a part of it.

“This garden’s special to Tulsa,” Bumgarner said. “It’s growing, as most gardens do, and it’s expanding and it’s future is going to be very bright.

“It’s a good effort, a good project, and we’re most happy to support it.”

A spokeswoman for the Botanic Garden said that while the Bumgarners declined to announce the exact amount of their donation, the entire project cost is about $1.25 million.

To make the water garden, crews will raise the pool at the seven-acre lake’s north end 18 inches to create a waterfall at the southern end. Opposite this feature at the Sunrise Bridge, water will flow into the garden over natural rock with a view to the floating gardens on both sides of the pool.

Those floating gardens will include water-loving plants like iris and hibiscus while the lilies take up the standing water in between on the southern end. The walking path will take visitors past the overlooks on the pool’s eastern side, with each platform offering a closer view at the lilies and floating gardens below beneath the cypress trees’ shade.

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NATURE’S GYM: Houston Botanic Garden

Houston’s newest greenspace just opened on Sept. 18.

HOUSTON — What floated around as an idea for decades is finally a reality: Houston has its own botanic garden.

“It’s just been meeting and exceeding expectations and we are so proud of that,” says president Claudia Gee Vassar.

The Houston Botanic Garden opened to the public on Sept. 18. For five years since signing a lease with the city, organizers and volunteers turned 132 acres along Sims Bayou into a horticultural hamlet from the real world.

“I think people are really recognizing, especially because of the pandemic, how healing it is to be out in nature — physically, mentally and emotionally,” Vassar says.

You can find that healing by wandering around what used to be Glenbrook Golf Course. There’s the Global Collection Garden, the Culinary Garden, the Coastal Prairie and even a Family Discovery Garden.

“I’m so fortunate,” laughs Vassar. “This is where I work, so I get to be out in nature every day!

Parts of the garden are still under construction, like the water walls that are slated to get running in December 2020. But this is only Phase 1 of this project. Organizers have a whole lot more planned.

“In the future, we hope to have an education and events building, a seasonal garden so people can see what they can plant in their own gardens and get some great inspirational ideas,” Vassar says. “Production facilities for research, a conservatory, so many wonderful things that we want to build!”

Whether any of that happens depends on how many Houstonians visit and support the garden. Right now, things are looking good.

“I think what has been so wonderful to hear from our guests so far is that this was even more than they even could have imagined,” says Vassar.

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Tulsa Botanic Garden announces new water garden construction to begin in January | Local News

The water garden’s name comes from John and Mary Ann Bumgarner of the Bumgarner Family Charitable Foundation, which made the “major gift” to make the project possible.

At Wednesday’s announcement, John Bumgarner said he is excited to see the garden develop further and thrilled to forever be a part of it.

“This garden’s special to Tulsa,” Bumgarner said. “It’s growing, as most gardens do, and it’s expanding and it’s future is going to be very bright.

“It’s a good effort, a good project, and we’re most happy to support it.”

A spokeswoman for the Botanic Garden said that while the Bumgarners declined to announce the exact amount of their donation, the entire project cost is about $1.25 million.

To make the water garden, crews will raise the pool at the seven-acre lake’s north end 18” to create a waterfall at the southern end. Opposite this feature at the Sunrise Bridge, water will flow into the garden over natural rock with a view to the floating gardens on both sides of the pool.

Those floating gardens will include water-loving plants like iris and hibiscus while the lilies take up the standing water in between on the southern end. The walking path will take visitors past the overlooks on the pool’s eastern side, with each platform offering a closer view at the lilies and floating gardens below beneath the cypress trees’ shade.

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Houston’s First Botanic Garden Opens as a Museum of Plants

Houston’s First Botanic Garden Opens as a Museum of Plants

Dutch landscape architecture and design firm West 8 has unveiled the first phase of Houston’s first ever Botanic Garden in Texas. Designed to be a “museum of plants”, the project features evolving collections to inform scientists, tourists and horticulturalists alike. Conceived over twenty years ago by locals, the project has been developed on an island in the city’s expansive Bayou system.

Courtesy of West 8, Barrett DohertyCourtesy of West 8, Barrett DohertyCourtesy of West 8, Barrett DohertyCourtesy of West 8, Barrett Doherty+ 8

Courtesy of West 8, Barrett Doherty
Courtesy of West 8, Barrett Doherty

The Houston Botanic Garden opened along the Sims Channel as part of a larger plan that will encompass 132 acres for learning and discovery. The garden includes outdoor gallery spaces that feature tropical, sub-tropical, and arid plants from around the world. Future phases will feature expansive outdoor spaces, and an open lawn for day-to-day use, as well as community events like movies, small concerts, private functions, and food festivals. It will also include a future conservatory building on site.

Courtesy of West 8, Barrett Doherty
Courtesy of West 8, Barrett Doherty

“The intent of the site design is to seek balance in all aspects, from planting and soils, through topography and materials—the careful juxtaposition of order and chaos that is at the heart of enduring gardens,” said Donna Bridgeman-Rossi, PLA, director of implementation, West 8 NY. “With this being Houston’s first garden of this kind, it was exciting to work with a client group that not only expects best practice but is open to the complexities required to push status quo into new territories or specifications.”

Courtesy of West 8, Barrett Doherty
Courtesy of West 8, Barrett Doherty

As the team notes, the Houston Botanic Garden’s in-house horticulture team worked alongside the consulting team to develop a mechanism to passively rehabilitate the clay soils of the bayou waterways through a series of sacrificial cover crops and experimental spore treatments. The team also created a structured medium to support a cross-section of plants from around the world.

Courtesy of West 8, Barrett Doherty
Courtesy of West 8, Barrett Doherty

Showcasing the biodiversity that thrives along the Texas Gulf Coast, the garden was designed in collaboration with Texas-based Clark Condon Associates, Overland Partners, and Walter P. Moore Engineers. The garden was constructed under the direction of General Contractors Harvey Builders.

News via West 8

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West 8 debuts first phase of Houston Botanic Garden

West 8, the award-winning Dutch landscape architecture and urban design firm with offices in Rotterdam and New York City, has unveiled the highly anticipated first phase of the Houston Botanic Garden, a years-in-the-making, first-of-its-kind horticultural hub for the Bayou City that aims to attract tourists, green thumbs, and the scientific community.

When fully complete, per West 8’s master plan, the so-called “living museum for plants” will encompass 132 acres of a bayou-bound island and adjacent shoreline along Sims Channel, with roughly half of the compound being on the island. Much of the Houston Botanic Garden is located on the former grounds of the old and underused 1920s-era Glenbrook Golf Course.

Following a prolonged period of NIMBY outrage, as some southeast Houston residents rallied against the project largely due to concerns over traffic and the loss of Glenbrook, which had been used by residents as an informal neighborhood green space, plans for the Houston Botanical Garden were formally revealed by West 8 in 2018 with construction kicking off early the next year. To be clear, while this marks the first time that Houston has had a proper botanic garden within city limits, there is a botanic garden at the Mercer Arboretum in unincorporated Harris County.

Described in a press statement as “an oasis of learning, discovery, and horticultural beauty” that differentiates itself from a typical arboretum by featuring an evolving, curated collection of plants, the Houston Botanic Garden opens to the public at a strange and difficult time for marquee cultural institutions, plant-focused or otherwise. However, the expansive and open-air nature of the walking trail-laced campus, which features a multitude of outdoor galleries that showcase a sizable collection of tropical, subtropical, and arid plants, does inherently lend itself well to safe and socially-distant visits.

a lush botanic garden in houston
Plans for a botanic garden in the museum- and cultural institution-rich Texan city date back more than 30 years. (Courtesy West 8/Barrett Doherty)

“Adding a world-class botanic garden to enhance the breadth and depth of Houston’s cultural offerings has been a long time in the making,” said Claudia Gee Vassar, president and general counsel of the Houston Botanic Garden, in a statement. “We believe the benefits of an extensive outdoor museum like the Houston Botanic Garden will be especially desirable at a time when so many are looking to engage with, and be inspired by nature.”

Outside of the ongoing pandemic, Tropical Storm Beta has thrown a slight wrench into the garden’s opening week plans. (It officially opened September 18.)

Key architectural elements revealed in Phase One include a series of 21 innovative, thin-shell concrete alcoves that line the main collection gardens and provide a natural place for visitors to duck out of the hot Houston sun and catch some shade (fabricated by Fine Concrete); a pair of monumental steel gates with intricate, botanic-inspired designs that are found at both the main pedestrian and vehicular entrances (fabricated by Renfrow + Co. Metalsmiths); a Welcome Fountain constructed from coral stone that was sourced by West 8 as a

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People & Places: Bridenstine to speak at drive-in fund-raiser; Botanic Garden wants families to DIG | Lifestyles

Event sponsors include C & G Emanuel Charitable Foundation, Hillcrest Healthcare System, TAB Services, Gable Gotwals Counsel, The Oxley Foundation, TTCU Federal Credit Union, Ruhrpumpen, and Steelehouse Productions.

All proceeds from the event will benefit Hospitality House of Tulsa. To purchase tickets, and more information: 918-794-0088, hhtulsa.org.

TULSA BOTANIC GARDEN

Tulsa Botanic Garden’s eighth annual D.I.G. — short for Day In the Garden — will be held Saturday, Sept. 26, on the grounds of the garden, 3900 Tulsa Botanic Drive.

This family-friendly fundraiser was postponed from earlier this year and rescheduled with a few adjustments for safety.

Families are encouraged to bring a blanket or chairs to spread out on lawn areas for picnicking, and watching a Science Show presented by Tulsa’s BAM entertainment and a concert by the Tulsa-based band Hot Toast Music Company. Families will pick up activity kits containing crafts, puzzles and a scavenger hunt families can do in the garden. A photo booth will be set up with a photographer for family snapshots.

The garden will be decorated for their annual Autumn In the Garden, with more than 5,000 pumpkins, scarecrows made by the community, and a hay maze. Families will also be able to explore the two-acre Children’s Discovery Garden and Tandy Floral Terraces.

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Qur’anic Botanic Garden celebrates 12th anniversary

The Qur’anic Botanic Garden (QBG), the first of its kind in the world to have all the plant species mentioned in the Holy Quran, and those in the Hadith and Sunnah, has celebrated its 12th anniversary.

The Qur’anic Botanic Garden, a member of Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development, held a virtual ceremony to mark the occasion, broadcasting a live video of the model park located in the center of Education City, its divisions, plants, the Botanical Museum, and the Plant Conservation Center.

The ceremony highlighted the role of the Qur’anic Botanic Garden since its establishment in demonstrating the interest of the Islamic heritage in preserving the environment and its tangible and continuous contributions to Qatar National Vision 2030. As part of its “Ghars” campaign, the QBG pledged to plant 2022 trees as part of the preparations for the 2022 FIFA World Cup. The campaign has planted nearly 2000 trees so far.

The ceremony also highlighted the tangible impact of the QBG and its prominent role in instilling a collective sense of responsibility towards the environment among school students of all ages, through its educational programs and initiatives that focus on environmental sustainability and preservation, namely the “Young Plant Researcher” program and the “Fun and Learn” educational program for the elementary level, as well as the educational Food Security program.

The participants underlined the keenness of the Qur’anic Botanic Garden on regularly launching campaigns, events and exhibitions, as well as agricultural and education programs to encourage community members to establish home gardens and preserve plant and natural resources. The most recent of which was the webinar the QBG hosted to highlight the main efforts made to conserve plants and the ecosystem in the Arabian Peninsula.

Commenting on the occasion, Project Manager of the Qur’anic Botanic Garden Fatima Al Khulaifi expressed happiness at celebrating the 12th anniversary of the Qur’anic Botanic Garden, praising the community engagement and support during the virtual events held during the difficult months of the coronavirus pandemic.

In addition to the events, programs and successful initiatives, the Qur’anic Botanic Garden has entered into fruitful partnerships with many prominent local and international institutions, including ministries and banks in the State of Qatar and botanic gardens around the world, Al Khulaifi added.

She also noted several achievements accomplished by the QBG and the most important developments it has witnessed since its establishment, in addition to its awareness programs and educational initiatives.

HH Sheikha Moza bint Nasser, the Chairperson of Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development, inaugurated the Qur’anic Botanic Garden in September 17, 2008, by planting the Gardens very first tree, the Sidra, which is the symbol of the Foundation.

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Houston Botanic Garden opens to the public today

HOUSTON, Texas (KTRK) — An urban oasis has sprouted in Houston. After years of planning, the Houston Botanic Garden opens to the public today.

“You’ll be able to see the incredible diversity of plants from across the globe,” Botanic Garden president Claudia Vassar said earlier this week.

The 132-acre garden shows off plants from southeast Texas and from around the world. They have more than 350 different species.

The land is an old municipal golf course leased from the city in 2015. Since then, the staff at the botanic garden and others have been planning, and now it’s a reality.

“As a global firm we were so honored to be invited by the people of Houston to contribute to a first for the Bayou City,” said Donna Bridgeman-Rossi with West 8 Urban Design and Landscape Architecture, who helped shape the garden.

RELATED: Memorial Park Conservancy unveils 100-acre Eastern Glades project

Vassar added, “It’s just a beautiful place, outdoor space, particularly during this time of coronavirus, when people are looking for incredible places to be, that’s a wonderful green asset to have.”

After two years of construction, the garden is ready to be shared with Houston.

You can purchase tickets and learn more about Houston Botanic Garden on their website.

Tickets are priced at $15 for adults, $10 for students with valid school identification, and $10 for children ages 3-15 years old.

Copyright © 2020 KTRK-TV. All Rights Reserved.

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Houston Botanic Garden Officially Opens, Showcasing Bayou City’s Biodiversity in New Living Museum for Plants – Press Release

HOUSTON–(Business Wire)–Houstonians no longer have to take the Gulf Freeway all the way to Galveston to escape to an island, now that the Houston Botanic Garden, the city’s new living museum for plants, has opened its gates today to the public, just east of I-45 South on Park Place Blvd. Approximately half of the Garden’s 132 acres – which was once a municipal golf course – are on the Island, a feature completely surrounded by the original Sims Bayou meander on three sides, and the later Sims channel to its south.

The Houston Botanic Garden has transformed the Island, and the adjacent South Gardens on the opposite side of the Sims channel, into an oasis of learning, discovery, and horticultural beauty, with outdoor gallery spaces displaying a collection of tropical, sub-tropical, and arid plants from around the world to showcase the biodiversity that thrives along the Texas Gulf Coast.

“Adding a world-class botanic garden to enhance the breadth and depth of Houston’s cultural offerings has been a long time in the making,” said Claudia Gee Vassar, president and general counsel of the Houston Botanic Garden. “We believe the benefits of an extensive outdoor museum like the Houston Botanic Garden will be especially desirable at a time when so many are looking to engage with and be inspired by nature.”

Through its design and programming, the Garden, a collaboration with West 8, an award-winning international landscape designer, seeks to enrich lives through discovery, education, and the conservation of plants and the natural environment.

“The intent of the site design is to seek balance in all aspects, from planting and soils, through topography and materials—the careful juxtaposition of order and chaos that is at the heart of enduring gardens,” said Donna Bridgeman-Rossi, PLA, director of implementation, West 8 NY. “With this being Houston’s first garden of this kind, it was exciting to be working with a client group that not only expects best practice but is open to the complexities required to push status quo into new territory or specification.”

Each time visitors come to the Houston Botanic Garden, they will exchange the bustle of the city for the enveloping serenity of multiple features, which include:

  • Global Collection Garden: Three acres of regionally themed zones that demonstrate the wide variety of diverse and beautiful plants from around the world that flourish in Houston’s climate.
  • Culinary Garden: An artistic display of edible and medicinal plants – many of which visitors could grow in their own yards – that have served as a basis for economic and cultural exchange across the history of the world.
  • Susan Garver Family Discovery Garden: A sensory-engaging area that presents opportunities for families to engage with nature in a variety of ways, including a boardwalk maze around a lagoon; simple water machines, and nature play structures crafted from trees that previously grew on the property.
  • Woodland Glade: An intimate-yet-open space that visitors can rent – beginning later in the fall – to host weddings and other celebrations under a
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