Chef Tom Becomes So Enraged He Storms Out of the Kitchen … or the Boat?

Chef Tom Checketts from Below Deck Mediterranean becomes unglued during lunch service as he ends up storming out of the kitchen. Could he be ready to walk?

Tom Checketts
Tom Checketts |Karolina Wojtasik/Bravo

Girlfriend Malia White warned Captain Sandy Yawn that Checketts was ready to leave as he grew more and more frustrated with the quality of the provisions. He explained that he is a perfectionist and that his reputation was on the line in the past few episodes.

Will he ultimately feel as though he can’t finish the last charter? Plus, why does he become so enraged in an upcoming episode?

The guests seem happy but Chef Tom stews

Guests on the last charter raved about Checketts’ food. A preview clip shows that the guests are also in love with the food too. But back in the galley kitchen, Checketts is melting down, upset with the fact he didn’t have time to fully debone the chicken before it was served.

“What a f**king disaster of a meal,” he tells White as she stands next to him. Yawn told White to stay out of the kitchen and away from Checketts at work, but clearly she is too concerned to follow orders. “I’m disgusted with this,” he adds.

RELATED: ‘Below Deck Med’: Chef Tom Tells Aesha Scott To ‘F**k Yourself’

“Last time I had the time to kind of bone all the chicken out and then re-fold the chicken with some herbs and lemon and whatever else inside,” he explains in a confessional interview. “But it still looks like a whole baby chicken. It’s a nice way of eating it. I didn’t have that time so I just quickly took the fillets off. It’s so frustrating.”

Chef Tom is pushed over the edge

Checketts plates the chicken and gets it ready to serve. “Do you want something on top of [it],” White asks Checketts about a garnish. But Checketts snidely responds, “Yeah, f**king crack cocaine.”

Aesha Scott stands by to run the chicken to the guests. “Tom’s this spoiled British brat,” Scott says in a confessional. “How do you see that as attractive?” But Scott remains professional, remarking that the chicken looks lovely.

RELATED: ‘Below Deck Med’: Aesha Scott Almost Saw ‘Evil’ in Tom Checketts’ Eyes

Suddenly Checketts can’t take it any longer. He throws his towel on the ground and storms out of the kitchen. “F**king hell!” he hollers as he walks away cursing. White, who is still in the kitchen, chases after Checketts. He clearly tries to find a space away from the cameras to meltdown.

White asks him what happened. “It’s just f**king sh*t,” he tells her. “It’s all f**king sh*t.” He continues to walk away down the stairs.

Chef Tom retreats to his cabin

“F**king hell,” Checketts says as he goes to his cabin. “I’m not gonna f**king do this. What a f**king joke.” He continues to curse as White stands next to him unsure what to do.

“Two more dinners to get through,” White reminds Checketts.

“I don’t

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Will the (auto, boat, home and garden) show go on? I-X Center closure, coronavirus pandemic cause turmoil for consumer events planners

CLEVELAND, Ohio — More cars are sold in March in northern Ohio than any other month, according to Lou Vitantonio, president of the Greater Cleveland Automobile Dealers Association.



Boats on display at the Progressive Cleveland Boat Show in January 2020. Will the event return in 2021? Organizers hope so.


© Gus Chan, The Plain Dealer/cleveland.com/TNS
Boats on display at the Progressive Cleveland Boat Show in January 2020. Will the event return in 2021? Organizers hope so.

Why? Because the weeklong Cleveland Auto Show always ends in early March, kicking off a flurry of car buying.

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Whether that happens in 2021 is anyone’s guess.

Organizers for the auto show, the Great Big Home and Garden Show, the Cleveland Boat Show and other popular consumer events were thrown for a loop on Wednesday, when the company that operates the International Exposition Center in Cleveland announced that it was closing the facility.

The news comes on top of what is already a very challenging time for the events industry, as the state continues to restrict most large gatherings due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Despite the challenges, Vitantonio said he is cautiously optimistic that the car show, which drew nearly 350,000 visitors over 10 days early this year, will be held in 2021.

Michelle Burke, president of the Lake Erie Marine Trades Association, which produces the popular Progressive Cleveland Boat Show every January at the I-X Center, said she, too, is hopeful. Her event draws 50,000 attendees and 300 vendors over five days. Some boat vendors said they generate 40% of their annual sales at the Cleveland show.

Burke is leading an effort to convince Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine to allow consumer shows to operate.

Statewide, convention centers have been largely restricted from reopening, at least for their intended purposes, as most large gatherings are still prohibited in Ohio (although there are numerous exceptions – for weddings, Browns and Bengals games, performance venues and other facilities).

Burke argues that consumer shows are not mass gatherings – they’re more like retail operations or entertainment venues and should be permitted under already existing state guidelines.

“We won’t have people all together, elbow to elbow,” she said. Like museums and amusement parks, consumer shows can restrict capacity, sell timed tickets, require one-way aisles and put rules in place to keep attendees safe.

She is organizing an effort on behalf of event operators throughout Ohio to put pressure on Columbus to ease restrictions. “There’s a problem and we have to solve it,” she said.

The Ohio Travel Association also is seeking clarification from the governor’s office on the issue of mass gatherings. Melinda Huntley, executive director of the association, said that the size of a venue should be considered when dictating how many people can attend an event.

A massive facility like the I-X Center shouldn’t be governed by the same rules as a small club.

“Here we are with an absolutely devasting travel economy,” she said. “We have to give these businesses the opportunity to do as much business as they can in a safe manner.”

DeWine spokesman Dan Tierney said the state will listen to

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Fresh twist in case of Sydney mother-of-two who died in the bathroom of a party boat the Lady Rose

Fresh twist in case of mother-of-two who died in the bathroom of a party boat as it’s revealed she ‘was poisoned by a harmful gas’ and captain is charged

  • A mother-of-two died in the locked toilet cubicle of cruise boat the Lady Rose
  • Shalina Abdulhussein, 39, was found by deckhand slumped over bathroom sink 
  • Her devastated family believe she had inhaled toxic gas in the confined space 
  • Other partygoers reported noticing a ‘strange smell’ earlier on the voyage 
  • An investigation found a ‘faulty waterless basin trap’ within the sewage system 
  • The faulty system led to the release of hydrogen sulphide into the cubicle
  • The captain, Paul Titze, 45, has now been charged with multiple offences 

Shalina Abdulhussein, 39, was found slumped over a bathroom sink on the three-level Lady Rose catamaran on February 2

Shalina Abdulhussein, 39, was found slumped over a bathroom sink on the three-level Lady Rose catamaran on February 2

The captain of a party boat where a mother-of-two was likely killed by poisonous gas which leaked onto the ship from a faulty sewage system has been charged over the incident.

Shalina Abdulhussein, 39, was discovered slumped over a bathroom sink on the three-level Lady Rose catamaran on Sydney Harbour on February 2, 2019. 

She had been celebrating at a birthday party on the ship before her body was discovered by a deckhand during the four-hour cruise.

Rumours quickly began swirling that she had been died of a drug overdose but her family vehemently denied those claims.

An investigation by the Office of Transport Safety has found a ‘faulty waterless basin trap’ within the sewage system led to the release of hydrogen sulphide into the cubicle.

Hydrogen sulphide is a colourless gas, which smells like rotten eggs. High-level exposure of the poisonous gas can be deadly.

The captain of the ship Paul Titze, 45, of Botany, has been charged with multiple offences by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) relating to the incident.

Ms Abdulhussein had been on board the Lady Rose catamaran for a four-hour birthday party

Ms Abdulhussein had been on board the Lady Rose catamaran for a four-hour birthday party

Partygoers were treated for shock after Ms Abdulhussein was found. Some reported a 'weird smell' on board the ship

Partygoers were treated for shock after Ms Abdulhussein was found. Some reported a ‘weird smell’ on board the ship

Titze has pleaded guilty to unreasonably placing the safety of another person at risk, court records show, the Daily Telegraph reported.

However, he has pleaded not guilty to operating recklessly or negligently while master of the Lady Rose on February 2, 2019.

The case has been adjourned and the matter will return for a hearing at a later date. 

The investigation into Ms Abdulhussein’s death found she was likely overcome by the harmful gas before passing out and dying during the party, The Sydney Morning Herald reported.

The investigation also found the crew lacked urgency in dealing with the gas as guests had reported a strong ‘rotting egg’ smell four hours before Ms Abdulhussein’s body as found. 

The Lady Rose left Pyrmont at 12.30pm with the 27 party guests on board. Within half an hour of their trip passengers

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