Supreme Court refuses appeal for Virginia school board’s transgender bathroom ban

Members of the U.S. Supreme Court pose for a group photo at the court in Washington, D.C., on Friday. Seated, from left to right, are Associate Justices Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas, Chief Justice John Roberts and Associate Justices Stephen Breyer and Sonia Sotomayor. Standing, from left to right, are Associate Justices Brett Kavanaugh, Elena Kagan, Neil Gorsuch and Amy Coney Barrett. Pool Photo by Erin Schaff/UPI | License Photo

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Court denies Gloucester School Board’s effort to appeal ruling declaring bathroom ban unconsitutional in Grimm case

GLOUCESTER, Va. (WAVY) — An effort by the Gloucester County School Board to appeal a ruling declaring its bathroom policy for transgender students unconstitutional has been denied.

Earlier this month, the school board filed a petition asking the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals to rehear its case against former student Gavin Grimm.

That request was denied, according to a tweet from the ACLU of Virginia.

“Discrimination against trans students is discrimination on the basis of sex and it’s illegal. Full stop,” the ACLU tweeted.

The school board announced Sept. 9 it had requested an en banc review in the Richmond-based United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit. The request would have meant the full circuit court of appeals — all the judges — would have heard the case and could potentially overturned the previous ruling by a three-judge panel.

The three-judge panel had ruled that the school division’s requirements that Grimm use restrooms for his biological sex, female, or private bathrooms violated his rights. Grimm began transitioning from female to male while at Gloucester High School. In 2016, as a senior in high school, he legally changed his sex to male via state court order and on his birth certificate.

The panel’s decision upheld a previous one from a federal judge in Norfolk. That judge ruled in 2019 that Grimm’s rights were violated under the Constitution’s equal protection clause as well as under Title IX, a federal civil rights law that protects people from discrimination based on sex in education programs or activities that receive federal financial assistance.


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This Is the Best Wood for Cutting Boards, According to a Test Kitchen Pro

When it comes to kitchen tools, a durable wood cutting board is one of our essentials. The only question is, what type of wood is best? There is no shortage of materials: acacia, teak, maple, bamboo, walnut—even Japanese cypress!



a close up of a person with a knife on a cutting board


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Use the guide below to decide what type of wood is right for your kitchen. Then, follow our tips for expert cutting board care.

What Is the Best Wood for Cutting Boards?

The Taste of Home Test Kitchen has use every type of wood cutting board on the market. And the winner is clear: maple. Sarah Farmer, who leads the Taste of Home culinary team, says, “We like our cutting boards like we like our syrup—of the maple variety.” In other words, her go-to material for a cutting board is maple.

“It’s durable, prevents the growth of bacteria, is easy on the knives and looks nice,” Sarah adds.

Maple cutting boards are also great because they’re easy to clean and sanitize. But keep in mind, no matter which wood cutting board you use, all types of wood are fairly porous and are likely to absorb juices from raw meat. Instead, use your wood cutting board for table-ready foods like herbs, vegetables, fruit, bread and cheese.

End Grain vs. Edge Grain Cutting Boards

This is another thing to keep in mind when you’re shopping for a cutting board. The terms “end grain” and “edge grain” refer to which part of the wood is used to construct the board. End grain is the end of the wood (where you can see the rings) and edge grain is the side of the wood (where you see a familiar wood grain pattern).

The two types of cutting boards are easy to tell apart because end grain cutting boards have a distinct checkerboard pattern made from several wood “ends” being fused together. Boards made from edge grain have the more traditional cutting board look. So which one is better? It all depends on your personal preference. End grain boards are a bit more expensive, but easier on your knives. Edge grain boards are more durable, easier to maintain and more affordable, but will cause your knives to dull faster.

Top-Rated Maple Cutting Boards

Now that we’ve revealed that maple is the best wood for cutting boards, it’s time to get your hands on one! For a classic board that will last a lifetime, we love this John Boos edge grain cutting board. It has a timeless reversible design, and it’s the perfect size with plenty of chopping space. We also love this Boos end grain board which has great reviews and comes in 10 different sizes. For a smaller board with a personal touch, check out this cute handled maple cutting board.

The post The Best Wood for Cutting Boards, According to Our Test Kitchen appeared first on Taste of Home.

Gallery: 20 Clever Uses for Plastic Bags You Have Lying Around the House (Taste of Home)

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