2021 Cost to Add a Bathroom | Basement Bathroom Additions, Half Baths

Adding a bathroom can cost from $5,000 for a simple conversion of existing space to $50,000 and up for a new addition to your house. The national average for a 100-square-foot, spa-like bathroom is over $75,000, so watch your budget carefully. You’ll likely recover 60% to 70% of your investment when you sell.

Existing Space New Addition
Average $15,000 $35,000
Low $5,000 $20,000
High $35,000 $90,000

Bathroom (and kitchens) soak up most of the budget. When done properly, you’ll upgrade your home, add value and improve your resale potential. But they can get expensive fast. Know when to splurge and when you can add value with little investment with the following cost guides.

Average Addition $200 – $300
Luxury Addition $450 – $600
the average cost to add a bathroom is $15,000 or $5,000 to $35,000.

On average, it costs $200 to $300 per square foot to add a bathroom onto your home. Luxury installations might run up to $600 per square foot for a new bathroom addition.

Master Bathroom Addition Cost

Adding a master bathroom costs $35,000 to $100,000, depending on how luxurious you go. Strategic placement counts, you can save a few thousand if you can tap into existing plumbing lines. Also, consider saving more by converting a small bathroom into a master suite. You’ll already have most of the plumbing in place and you’ll only need to pour a foundation for a partial addition.

How Much Does It Cost to Add a Bathroom in a Basement?

Adding a bathroom in a basement costs $8,000 to $15,000 on average. You’ll save $500 to $1,000 if you have a rough-in drain already in place – typical in newer homes and usually near the main drain line. It’s usually cheaper in an unfinished basement since you won’t need any demo work and can pull from existing plumbing running to the main floors.

Basement Bathroom Plumbing Rough in Costs

Bathroom plumbing rough in costs $1,500 to $4,000 depending mostly on the number of fixtures you want. Sometimes that price includes final hookups as well as the rough in but will require a second trip. Once a plumber completes a rough in, they must wait until the floors, walls and cabinets get installed to come back out and install the fixtures and make connections.

Some other costs you might want to consider include:

Upstairs Bathroom $8,000 – $35,000
Laundry Conversion $5,000 – $12,000
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The Kitchen in This Basement Apartment Is Basically a Greenhouse

<div class="caption"> Rosie intended to install austere slate-gray cabinetry, but she was taken with the Ruskin Blossom hue when she visited Pluck’s studio. “If you’re able to take it away from its current cultural associations, it’s just a nice color,” she explains. “It looks really lovely against the greenery.” </div>

Rosie intended to install austere slate-gray cabinetry, but she was taken with the Ruskin Blossom hue when she visited Pluck’s studio. “If you’re able to take it away from its current cultural associations, it’s just a nice color,” she explains. “It looks really lovely against the greenery.”

Though television producer Rosie Rockel was a first-time homeowner when she renovated her South London apartment, she was able to approach the project with some useful background experience. Rosie’s entertainment industry job has her working on the show Grand Designs, a British home improvement series that highlights impressive, elaborate architecture. Perhaps that’s why she was so confident in her ability to design the kitchen remodel on her own. “I had a very clear picture of exactly what I wanted it to look like,” Rosie says.

The main aims were to bring light into this room of her flat, which is situated in the semisubterranean basement of a massive Victorian mansion, and connect it with the private garden. To achieve this, Rosie submitted multiple rounds of inventive blueprints to the local planning authority, but strict conservation laws only permitted her to construct a standard, conservatory-like extension with a glass roof. Though this building style was not her first choice, it actually allowed her to accomplish both her goals. Sunshine flows in amply, illuminating the once-dingy area and offering an ideal environment to grow Rosie’s bevy of potted plants. The indoor and outdoor foliage live together harmoniously, fusing the spaces to create a lush, verdant haven in the middle of a buzzing neighborhood.

<div class="caption"> The cramped old kitchen. </div>

The cramped old kitchen.

Location: Though the address is technically on the bustling Brixton Road, the house is set back as a refuge from the action. “When you come off the street, which is really busy and hectic and polluted, and there’s this very quiet, high-walled, green garden out the back, it really does feel like a little oasis,” Rosie says.

The before: Prior to the renovation, the kitchen and living room were combined in a cramped, gloomy box. With just a single barred window, the area was so dark that Rosie needed to keep all the lights on during the day. The finishes were also rather cheap.

The inspiration: “The building itself is Victorian, but because it’s a basement flat, there are no original features—no cornicing, no historical fireplaces. If I had had those things, I probably would’ve gone for a more classical look, but I thought it would be quite nice to go for something that had echoes of modernism. I wanted it to have a slight midcentury feel, but also be quite contemporary.”

Square footage: 4 square meters (approximately 43 square feet)

Budget: £70,000 (approximately $89,700)

<div class="caption"> A smattering of artwork hangs above Rosie’s dining table. She isn’t embarrassed to confess that the California image is just the picture that came in the IKEA frame. </div>

A smattering of artwork hangs above Rosie’s dining table. She isn’t embarrassed to confess that the California image is just the picture that came in the IKEA frame.

Main ingredients

Cabinetry: Pluck Custom Birch Plywood Cabinets with Ruskin Blossom Laminate and London Plane Veneer Fronts and Pill-Shaped Recessed

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Home Improvement Tips – Waterproofing Your Basement!

Basements, sadly, are subject to a number of negative stereotypes ie they are dark, dreary, damp and humid. Well, you can take care of the dark, dreariness with a few well thought out design flourishes, but the damp and humid part is a little more challenging. Waterproofing is imperative if you are going to use your basement as any type of occupied space.

The process of waterproofing involves a combination of sealing and finding drainage solutions. If you start too late, you will also have to include water damage restoration in this process. When properly protected from water, your basement can function just like any other part of your house.

Understanding Water Leakage
The first step towards any recovery is admitting you have a problem, and a water leakage problem is no different. Usually leakage is caused by a number of different factors. As your home ages, your basement begins to settle and form tiny cracks and fissures in the walls and floors. These tiny openings can let water into the space. Basement walls and floors are made out of concrete, which is a porous material. Also, most basements are built below the water table so the ground water causes hydrostatic pressure, which pushes on the basement walls and can soak through the pores and cracks in the concrete. Other leakage may also occur at the footers where the walls and floors meet. This is usually because the hydrostatic pressure is pushing on the basement walls with more force than it is pushing on the floors. This causes the walls to start cracking slightly at the footer, and it allows water in to the basement.

Devising a Plan
In order to devise a game plan for fixing your leaky basement, it is helpful to understand the basics of water seepage. Cracks in the floors, walls, and joints must be sealed as soon as they are visible. You can also seal the entire interior of your basement (walls and floors) to prevent water from being wicked to the inside space. Slightly more drastic measures can also be taken. You can install French drains, sump pumps, and drainage systems that are on the exterior, interior, or below the slab. All of these systems help reduce the hydrostatic pressure on the basement walls, which cause the majority of basement leakage.

Call in a Basement Waterproofing Contractor
When it comes to waterproofing your basement, you are better off letting the pros handle the job. You might be tempted to tackle the project yourself, but note that fewer then 20% of homeowners are successful at waterproofing their own basements. With odds like these, it is wise to call in a professional basement waterproofing contractor. This professional will have the skills necessary to identify the source of the seepage, and determine the best way for addressing the problem. Hiring a professional before trying it yourself will end up saving you time and money in the long run. A dry basement is a pleasant basement, so save …

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