The Rose Garden Ceremony for Amy Coney Barrett May Have Been a Super-Spreader Event. Could It Derail Her Supreme Court Nomination?

Republican senators, led by Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Judiciary Committee chairman Lindsey Graham, are trying to rush through the Supreme Court nomination of Amy Coney Barrett in near-record time, hoping to confirm her as the court’s ninth justice by Election Day, now just a month away.

But the coronavirus may end up thwarting those plans.

It’s looking more and more like the Rose Garden ceremony held on Sept. 26 to announce Barrett’s nomination to the seat left vacant by the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg will turn out to be a super-spreader event. A number of attendees, including two key senators on the Senate Judiciary Committee—Thom Tillis of North Carolina and Mike Lee of Utah—and, of course, President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump, have since tested positive for coronavirus and have entered quarantine. Among the other attendees who have announced that they too have tested positive: former presidential advisor Kellyanne Conway (disclosed by her daughter on TikTok); former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, who was one of Trump’s debate coaches before Tuesday’s face-off with Joe Biden; Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien and Rev. John Jenkins, the president of Notre Dame University, where Barrett taught for 15 years before being elevated to the Circuit Court of Appeals in 2019.

From the beginning, the timeline to confirm Barrett before Election Day was going to be a tight one. Sen. Graham had announced that hearings would begin on Oct. 12, saying he expected to send the judge’s nomination to the full Senate by Oct. 22 and then confirm her as soon as Oct. 26, eight days before Election Day

Top Senate Democrats have, from the beginning of the process, complained bitterly about its speed, arguing that no hearings should take place until the voters have a chance to choose a president on Nov. 3. The coronavirus developments have only amplified those objections.

“It’s critical that Chairman Graham put the health of senators, the nominee and staff first—and ensure a full and fair hearing that is not rushed, not truncated and not virtual,” Sen. Chuck Schumer, the minority leader, and Sen. Dianne Feinstein, the top Democrat on the Judiciary Committee, said in a joint statement issued Friday. “Otherwise this already illegitimate process will become a dangerous one.” Schumer followed up with a tweet after the news of Lee’s and Tillis’s positive tests became public:

Sen. Elizabeth Warren also tweeted out her concerns about the confirmation hearings going forward:

The Republicans have a 53–47 majority in the Senate, but two of their members, Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, have already said they oppose holding a vote to confirm a Supreme Court justice before the election. With all Democrats going on the record to say that they will oppose the nomination, McConnell will need every remaining vote of his party’s senators (and possibly the tie-breaker of Vice President Mike Pence) to confirm Barrett. 

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‘Rose Garden Massacre’: Was Barrett Event a Super Spreader?

rose garden massacre


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The term “Rose Garden Massacre” is trending online.

Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett tested negative for the COVID-19 virus, but the term “Rose Garden Massacre” is trending online because a number of people who attended her nomination press conference now have COVID-19, including President Donald Trump, First Lady Melania Trump, and the president of Notre Dame University, John Jenkins.

TMZ, using the headline “Rose Garden Massacre,” reported that the event “was ground zero for what is increasingly looking like a super-spreader COVID event.”

According to TMZ, the list of people with COVID-19 who attended the event also includes Senator Mike Lee, Senator Thom Tillis, Kellyanne Conway, and Hope Hicks. TMZ reported that “almost no one was wearing masks or social distancing.” The Guardian reported that at least seven people who attended the event now have coronavirus. The two senators, who are both on the Senate Judiciary Committee that will hear the nomination, did not wear masks at the event, according to Guardian. Lee has “symptoms consistent with longtime allergies,” and Tillis doesn’t have symptoms.

Another person at the event with COVID-19 is former New Jersey Governor Chris Christie. An unnamed journalist at the Rose Garden event also has coronavirus, according to ABC News.

To be sure, it’s not clear when all of those people got COVID-19, where, and from who. However, concern grew that coronavirus might have spread at the press conference, which was held September 25. The timeline of when President Trump came down with the virus is in dispute; his doctor initially said in a press conference on October 3 that the president was 72 hours into his diagnosis, but the White House later clarified that the president tested positive on Thursday October 1. “This morning while summarizing the President’s health, I incorrectly used the term ‘seventy two hours’ instead of ‘day three’ and ‘forty eight hours’ instead of ‘day two’ with regards to his diagnosis and the administration of the polyclonal antibody therapy,” the president’s doctor, Sean Conley, later said. “The President was first diagnosed with COVID-19 on the evening of Thursday, October 1st and had received Regeron’s antibody cocktail on Friday, October 2nd.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says of COVID-19: “The estimated incubation period is between 2 and 14 days with a median of 5 days.”

Here’s what you need to know:


Video Shows People at the Event Hugging & Not Wearing Masks

The Washington Post reported that Barrett is tested daily for the virus and most recently tested negative Friday morning, October 2. President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump announced that they both have tested positive for coronavirus.

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At Least 8 People Test Positive For Coronavirus After Rose Garden Event For Barrett

Updated at 12:28 p.m. ET

A week ago, more than 100 people gathered in the White House Rose Garden to celebrate President Trump’s third nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court, Amy Coney Barrett. Guests mingled, hugged and kissed on the cheek, most without wearing masks. An indoor reception followed the outdoor ceremony.

Seven days later, at least eight people who attended the ceremony have tested positive for the coronavirus, including the president. Several more of the president’s closest aides and advisers have also tested positive.

The president and first lady

President Trump, first lady Melania Trump and Judge Amy Coney Barrett walk into the Rose Garden for last Saturday’s nomination announcement. The first couple have since tested positive for the coronavirus. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

President Trump announced early Friday that he and first lady Melania Trump had tested positive. In introducing Barrett and pledging a swift confirmation in the Senate, the Trump campaign appeared to be finally making progress toward shifting the focus of the campaign away from the coronavirus.

Less than a week later, the president would fly to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center for treatment after his own diagnosis. Barrett tested negative on Friday.

Kellyanne Conway

Kellyanne Conway and Attorney General William Barr talk with guests in the Rose Garden. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Trump’s now former senior adviser sat in the front row. She tested positive on Friday and said her symptoms are mild. Conway also reportedly participated in debate preparations inside the White House later in the week.

Mike Lee

Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, and his wife, Sharon Lee, walk into the Rose Garden on Saturday. The senator tested positive five days later. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Sen. Mike Lee announced a positive test result on Friday. He was seen hugging and kissing other guests and not wearing a mask at the event.

The Utah Republican is also a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee and met with Barrett earlier this week, again without masks. Lee says he will isolate for 10 days.

Thom Tillis

Republican senators Rep. Deb Fischer (R-Neb.), Sen. Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.), Sen. Mike Crapo (R-Idaho), Sen. Thom Tillis (R-N.C.), Sen. Josh Hawley (R-Mo.), Sen. Ben Sasse (R-Neb.), Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah) and Sen. Kelly Loeffler (R-Ga.) in the Rose Garden. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Sen. Thom Tillis, R-N.C., also received a positive test on Friday. Republican members of the Senate Judiciary Committee attended the Saturday announcement. Tillis wore a mask during the ceremony, but several of his colleagues did not.

Tillis later participated in a Senate debate in North Carolina.

He is the second judiciary committee member to test positive. He said he will isolate for 10 days. More positives from the Judiciary Committee could impact Barrett’s confirmation timetable.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said Friday the hearings will proceed as planned.

Senator Ron Johnson, R-Wis., has also tested positive. He is not on the Judiciary Committee and did not attend the Rose Garden event.

Father John Jenkins

Notre Dame President Father John
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At Least 7 People Test Positive For Coronavirus After Rose Garden Event For Barrett

A week ago, more than 100 people gathered in the White House Rose Garden to celebrate President Trump’s third nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court, Amy Coney Barrett. Guests mingled, hugged and kissed on the cheek, most without wearing masks. An indoor reception followed the outdoor ceremony.

Seven days later, at least seven people who attended the ceremony have tested positive for the coronavirus, including the president. Several more of the president’s closest aides and advisors have also tested positive.

The president and first lady

President Trump announced early Friday that he and first lady Melania Trump had tested positive. In introducing Judge Barrett and pledging a swift confirmation in the Senate, the Trump campaign was finally making progress toward shifting the focus of the campaign away from the coronavirus.

Less than a week later, the president would fly to Walter Reed Medical Center for treatment after his own diagnosis. Barrett tested negative on Friday.

Kellyanne Conway

Trump’s now former senior adviser sat in the front row. She tested positive on Friday and said her symptoms are mild. Conway also reportedly participated in debate preparations inside the White House later in the week.

Mike Lee

Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, received a positive test result on Friday. He was seen hugging and kissing other guests and not wearing a mask at the event.

The Utah Republican is also a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee and met with Judge Barrett later in the week, again without masks. Lee says he will isolate for 10 days.

Thom Tillis

Sen. Thom Tillis, R-N.C., also received a positive test on Friday. Republican members of the Senate Judiciary Committee attended the Saturday announcement. Tillis wore a mask during the ceremony, but several of his colleagues did not.

Tillis later participated in a Senate debate in North Carolina.

He is the second judiciary committee member to test positive. He said he will isolate for 10 days. More positives from the Judiciary Committee could impact Barrett’s confirmation timetable.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said Friday the hearings will proceed as planned.

Senator Ron Johnson, R-Wis., has also tested positive. He is not on the Judiciary Committee and did not attend the Rose Garden event.

Father John Jenkins

Notre Dame President Father John Jenkins attended Saturday’s event to celebrate Barrett, an alum who taught for 15 years at Notre Dame’s law school. After testing positive, he said in a statement that he “regrets his error in judgement” in deciding not to wear a mask.

A White House journalist who covered the Rose Garden ceremony also tested positive.

Other Trump Officials And Aides Test Positive

Three other officials close to the president have also tested positive this week.

Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien announced a positive test late Friday night.

Hope Hicks, one of the president’s closest aides, tested positive on Thursday. Her positive diagnosis appears to have spurred the president getting tested on Thursday night. Hicks felt unwell after a campaign event Wednesday night and attempted to

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What Is The ‘Rose Garden Massacre?’ Amy Coney Barrett Announcement May Have Been Super Spreader Event

As President Donald Trump and several other key members of the Republican Party and his staff continue to test positive for COVID-19, all eyes are turning to an event last weekend which all of the parties now ill were present at—the President’s Rose Garden ceremony to announce Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination to the Supreme Court.

According to the Washington Post, at least seven people who were in attendance at the Sept. 25 event—including the President, Republican senators Thom Tillis and Mike Lee, former counselor Kellyanne Conway and Notre Dame President John Jenkins—have all since tested positive for the coronavirus. Mask use was not common at the event, with several people forgoing facial coverings, as social distancing was also largely ignored. Since then, speculation has grown that someone in attendance was positive for the virus, and then spread it to the others who have all since become infected.

Thus far, symptoms have reportedly been mild for most of those infected, though the President has been hospitalized at Walter Reed Medical Center put of precaution.

Barrett has tested negative after attending the event, though she was previously diagnosed with the virus during the late summer and recovered, CNN reports.

Since news of many who attended the event getting sick broke, critics have taken to Twitter to deem it the “Rose Garden Massacre,” which trended on Saturday as more names of attendees were released as people who tested positive.

Others used the news to criticize the President and his family for their generally refusing to wear masks—pointing out the President’s family for all taking off their masks after being seated at Tuesday’s debate in Ohio with Joe Biden.

Some also took the news to poke fun at the last time the Rose Garden made news—which was over the summer after Melania Trump caught criticism for changing the look of the space and ripping out plants put in by Jackie Kennedy ahead of the Republican National Convention.

In a press conference Saturday, Dr. Sean Conley stated the President is “doing very well,” though he remains hospitalized. 

White House Rose Garden The White House Rose Garden is pictured on August 22, 2020 after renovations. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

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Two GOP senators test positive for Covid-19, potentially jeopardizing Barrett confirmation vote

Two Republican senators on the Senate Judiciary Committee announced Friday that they had tested positive for Covid-19, potentially jeopardizing the GOP’s hopes of swiftly confirming Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court if they were both to remain unable to vote in the full Senate through the end of the month.



Mike Lee, Thom Tillis are posing for a picture: Sen. Mike Lee (R-UT) and Sen. Thom Tillis (R-NC)


© Getty Images
Sen. Mike Lee (R-UT) and Sen. Thom Tillis (R-NC)

Sens. Mike Lee of Utah and Thom Tillis of North Carolina announced they’d tested positive — just days after attending a White House event where President Donald Trump nominated Barrett. Multiple attendees of that event, including Trump, have tested positive in the week since the ceremony, which featured many people not wearing masks and not observing social distancing protocols.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer on Friday renewed demands for Republicans to delay Barrett’s confirmation hearings. But Senate Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham told CNN on Friday night he plans to move ahead with confirmation hearings on October 12 and a committee vote later in the month.

Confirmation hearings could go on without Lee and Tillis, both of whom met in person with Barrett earlier this week, and could participate virtually in the hearings.

Graham said he needs the two senators to be back by October 15, when the committee will begin its debate of the nomination after the hearings are done.

The South Carolina Republican said he expects the members who have tested positive to be back in time for a committee vote on October 22. The concern is if Democrats boycott the commitee vote, the GOP may not have a quorum for that vote if both senators are absent. The committee rules require a majority of members on the panel to be present for a quorum.

But even if they don’t have a quorum, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell can always advance the nomination to the floor under the rules.

The greater concern for Republicans is the Senate floor vote, for which lawmakers do need to be present to vote and for which the GOP has no margin for error. If Tillis and Lee were to be gone for an extended period, it would threaten the chances of confirming Barrett, given Republicans’ 53-47 majority.

Already, two other Republicans — Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska — have signaled they are unlikely to vote for Barrett because they think the high court selection should be made by whoever wins the White House on November 3.

Video: Trump has Covid, now what? (CNN)

Trump has Covid, now what?

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If only Lee were out, Barrett could still get confirmed with the tie-breaking vote of Vice President Mike Pence. But if one more Republican were unavailable to vote, they wouldn’t have the votes to confirm Barrett. So now that Tillis is also entering isolation, the GOP’s math gets trickier since it’s unknown how long the senators will be out.

Republicans have told CNN the current plan is to vote on the

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Utah Sen. Mike Lee tests positive for coronavirus 5 days after attending White House event announcing Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett



Mike Lee et al. standing in front of a cake: Judge Amy Coney Barrett, President Donald Trump's nominee to the Supreme Court, meets with Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, at the Capito on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2020. Al Drago/Pool via AP


© Al Drago/Pool via AP
Judge Amy Coney Barrett, President Donald Trump’s nominee to the Supreme Court, meets with Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, at the Capito on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2020. Al Drago/Pool via AP

  • Sen. Mike Lee said on Twitter on Friday that he has tested positive for COVID-19 after experiencing what he thought were “longtime allergies.”
  • “Unlike the test I took just a few days ago while visiting the White House, yesterday’s test came back positive,” the Republican senator from Utah wrote.
  • Lee attended a ceremony at the White House on Saturday during which President Donald Trump announced that Judge Amy Coney Barrett is his Supreme Court nominee. 
  • Pictures from the event show a tightly packed crowd of people, many of whom weren’t wearing masks, instead shaking hands and hugging each other.
  • Lee also met with Barrett on Capitol Hill on Tuesday and returned for a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Wednesday. He was seen maskless both times.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Sen. Mike Lee, a Republican from Utah, announced on Friday that he has tested positive for the coronavirus.

“Yesterday morning, I was experiencing symptoms consistent with longtime allergies,” Lee wrote on Twitter. “Out of an abundance of caution, I sought medical advice and was tested for Covid-19.”

“Unlike the test I took just a few days ago while visiting the White House, yesterday’s test came back positive,” he added.

Lee said that he plans to isolate himself for the next 10 days, based on advice from a physician. “Like so many other Utans, I will now spend part of 2020 working from home,” he said.

Lee noted, however, that he plans to be “back to work to join my Judiciary Committee colleagues in advancing the Supreme Court nomination of Jude Amy Coney Barrett.”

Lee attended a ceremony at the White House on Saturday during which President Donald Trump announced Barrett’s selection. 

Images from the event show a large crowd with no social distancing and many people not wearing face masks. Some attendees hugged, bumped elbows, and shook hands with each other. Footage from CNN shows that Lee did so, too.

Lee met Barrett again on Tuesday, this time on Capitol Hill. Pictures show that neither Barrett nor Lee were wearing face masks or staying six feet away from one another. 

He was photographed, maskless again, at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Wednesday about the FBI’s investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. 

The Senate is expected to begin Barrett’s confirmation hearings on Oct. 12. The staunchly conservative justice has been tapped by Trump to take the place of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg who died on Sept. 18.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and California Sen. Dianne Feinstein reacted to Lee’s diagnoses on Friday, calling it “unfortunate news, according to Bloomberg News reporter Laura Litvan.

“The unfortunate news about the infection of

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Cipollone, Meadows Lead White House Effort to Confirm Barrett to Supreme Court

WASHINGTON—President Trump has nominated Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court. But his White House’s work is just beginning.

While the decision to confirm Judge Barrett rests with the Senate, the job of vigorously defending her to reassure those lawmakers—and keep an already-accelerated process on track—will fall squarely to the Trump White House.

The West Wing will have help. The president’s robust re-election team, which has raised more than $1 billion and occupies three floors of a Washington-area office building with multiple TV studios and scores of staff, has been prepped to support the nominee. A coterie of conservative issue groups and public-relations firms are mounting their own $20 million marketing campaign.

But the tip of that spear remains Mr. Trump’s West Wing, which must overcome its own internal divisions, a dearth of deep relationships in the Senate and a mixed record of achievement on Capitol Hill.

Mr. Trump has replaced nearly all of his senior staff since Justice Neil Gorsuch was confirmed on April 7, 2017, and most of the top aides who helped with the last Supreme Court nominee, Justice Brett Kavanaugh, who was confirmed on Oct. 6, 2018.

Chief of Staff Mark Meadows and Pat Cipollone, the White House counsel, are both new to the job since Mr. Kavanaugh was confirmed. Their partnership will determine the success of the White House confirmation team, officials said.

President Trump with Judge Amy Coney Barrett at the White House nomination event on Saturday.



Photo:

Shawn Thew/Zuma Press

The White House team for Ms. Barrett’s confirmation has been slow to coordinate on messaging with its Senate counterparts, according to people familiar with the process. But others said it is on track, pointing out that Judge Barrett started filling out a lengthy Senate questionnaire ahead of the nomination, and much of her background vetting has been completed.

But the White House’s legislative-affairs office, which played a key role in previous confirmations, has seen its role diminished in recent months as Mr. Meadows, a former House member from North Carolina, has taken on some of those lobbying duties. The office is currently run by Amy Swonger, a former aide to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who has been operating with the title of acting director, even though the position doesn’t require Senate approval.

“What they’re up against is a very determined opposition and tight time frame,” said Jon Kyl, a former Republican senator from Arizona who helped guide Justice Kavanaugh’s intense confirmation process.

If Mr. Trump is successful in his push to install Judge Barrett before Nov. 3, he would be the first president in nearly 50 years to have a third Supreme Court nominee confirmed before facing re-election, according to Senate records. It may also stand as either the final significant achievement of Mr. Trump’s first term, or—depending on the outcome of the election—his last major act as president.

So far as president, few of Mr. Trump’s accomplishments have been marked by the kind of rapid and polished execution he

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Amy Coney Barrett confirmation: Inside the White House’s plan to deploy ‘knife fighters’ to defend nominee

EXCLUSIVE: The White House is mounting an “offensive” communications strategy ahead of Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett’s upcoming Senate confirmation fight, with aides describing an aggressive plan for “knife fighters” to “fiercely” defend the nominee ahead of what’s expected to be a heated battle on Capitol Hill.

Fox News has learned the White House has formed a team to handle what’s to come in the weeks ahead as Senate Republicans aim to get President Trump’s nominee confirmed to the high court before Election Day.

AMY CONEY BARRETT ACCEPTS PRESIDENT TRUMP’S NOMINATION TO THE SUPREME COURT, PLEDGES TO ‘FAITHFULLY AND IMPARTIALLY’ DISCHARGE DUTIES 

Senior White House officials told Fox News that the team is broken into two parts: one focused on communications and the other focused on guiding Barrett through the process on Capitol Hill.

Senior officials argued the team is “uniquely equipped” for the mission: The White House communications team will consist of White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany, who is a graduate of Harvard Law School and will take on the role of “lead spokesperson.” Deputy Press Secretary Brian Morgenstern, a graduate of Columbia Law School, and White House communications officials Alyssa Farah and Ben Williamson, who are veterans of Capitol Hill and who have unique relationships with Republican leadership in both chambers of Congress, are also on the team.

The communications team will also include White House staff who will be dedicated to a rapid response effort and research.

“We will need to be knife fighters with the opposition, and will be prepared to marshal information quickly, and disseminate it to push back on any false narratives or attacks on her and her family, because we anticipate, unfortunately, that Democrats will go there,” a senior official told Fox News.

“So we’re mounting an offensive strategy on her behalf because she is such an incredible and inspiring nominee,” the official continued. “We’ll be defending her fiercely every day.”

Another official told Fox News that the communications team intends to be “very well-synced” with Senate communicators, including Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s office, the Senate Republican conference and the Senate Judiciary Committee.

“We will work closely with them,” the official said.

As for the Hill process, White House Counsel Pat Cippollone and White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows will play “integral roles.”

Senior officials told Fox News that Meadows will be tasked with prepping Barrett and shepherding her through the Senate.

“He knows exactly the senators we’ll need to win over, and the issues that matter to them,” one senior White House official told Fox News. “He knows which senators to target that could bring over votes for her, and will help her to remain independent and speak to her own judicial record to win those key votes. He’s a Capitol Hill strategist.”

As for Cippollone, an official told Fox News that he “knows what she’ll be questioned on.”

“He’ll know ways to navigate those without telegraphing too much to get through the confirmation,” another official told Fox

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Liberal Tantrums Over Amy Coney Barrett Were Expected, With Rose Garden Decoration Being Very Triggering

Well, it’s official. As Katie wrote, Judge Amy Coney Barrett of the U.S. Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals has been tapped to fill the vacancy left by the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Ginsburg passed away on September 18 at the age of 87, which sent liberal America into meltdown mode. The liberal wing on the Court is crumbling and to make matters worse for them, President Trump is picking her successor. Nothing could be more delicious. And what’s better is that this isn’t much discontent among Senate Republicans this time. We’re pretty united. The only solid ‘no’ vote right now is Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME) because Maine is weird and frankly, this SCOTUS fight will not help her. It will help everyone else. Nothing gets the conservative base more animated than a fight for the Supreme Court.  

Look, I’m not trying to excuse Collins’ weak sauce opposition, but I can understand the reasoning, I guess. Whatever, it’s of no concern because all loose ends are tied. Sen. Mitt Romney (R-UT) is behind us. And Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) another member of the GOP Senate Squish Squad is walking back her initial ‘nay’ vote. Mitch McConnell said to keep their powder dry and not make any declarative statements at the outset of this fight. That has appeared to have sunk through. Also, if Murkowski wants access to campaign war chest funds by the time of her re-election, remain in the ‘yea’ column on this issue. We have the votes. We’re going to fill this seat before Election Day. Period. 

Still, this is a free country. Liberals can have their rant. And they’re sure going bananas over this fight. Bill Maher attacked ACB over her Catholicism, which is going to be key. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) did that during her confirmation hearing for the appeals court. Some wacky stuff is about to trickle out from the mouths of the Left—this is no exception. America’s most underreported prejudice is about to rear its ugly head in a way not seen since 1858. For now, though, it seems there’s was an ‘as expected’ reaction regarding how this process is illegitimate. Some noted how the Rose Garden was decorated to resemble when Ruth Bader Ginsburg was nominated back in 1993. 

And yes, there have been horrible swipes at ACB’s kids, with ‘woke’ lectures, but that was all spewed before this announcement was made official. It looks like most of the tantrums were out of their system.

This could change–I know.

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