Candace Owens team paid for attendees to travel to White House event

Mask wearing was not requirement for entrance to the event

Black conservative activist Candace Owens led a group of visitors to a Trump event at the White House. ABC News is now reporting that Owens’s group “BLEXIT” paid for the travel and lodging of some visitors.

Activist Candace Owens speaks to guests during the NRA-ILA Leadership Forum at the 148th NRA Annual Meetings & Exhibits on April 26, 2019 in Indianapolis, Indiana. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Activist Candace Owens speaks to guests during the NRA-ILA Leadership Forum at the 148th NRA Annual Meetings & Exhibits on April 26, 2019 in Indianapolis, Indiana. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

BLEXIT, a moniker of Black Exit refers to Black people leaving the Democratic Party to become Republicans.

Saturday’s White House event featured President Donald Trump who was recently diagnosed with COVID-19, and did not enforce social distancing.

Read More: Trump makes 1st public appearance since his hospital stay

“EVERYONE MUST BRING A MASK TO BE ALLOWED ENTRY ONTO THE WHITE HOUSE GROUNDS,” Owen’s campaign’s statement in a private email obtained by ABC News. “Absolutely no exceptions.”

Mask wearing was not requirement for entrance, though. The attendees had to submit to a COVID-19 screening the morning of the event, which consisted of a temperature check and a brief questionnaire, according to ABC News.

U.S. President Donald Trump addresses a rally in support of law and order on the South Lawn of the White House on October 10, 2020 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump addresses a rally in support of law and order on the South Lawn of the White House on October 10, 2020 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Getty Images)

Supporters attended a prescheduled BLEXIT event called the “BLEXIT Back the Blue” to support police officers. After that event, the group headed to Trump’s “HUGE outdoor rally.”

The BLEXIT campaign reportedly used its funds to pay for guests to show up to the event. Some on social media speculate that Owens and her supporters are used as puppets to help Trump’s image with Black people.

“We are not interested in participating in your obvious media angle here to slander/attack the President regarding Covid-19,” Owens said in response to ABC News’ request for comment. “[The BLEXIT Back the Blue event] is about supporting law enforcement in minority communities.

It is unknown how much money was used.

Read More: Trump vows not to participate in virtual debate with Biden

White House spokesman Judd Deere told ABC News the administration had no involvement in accommodating anyone.

Trump is currently struggling with support among Black voters as Joe Biden led him 88% to 9% among Black registered voters, according to a Sept. 26 ABC/Washington Post poll.

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The post Candace Owens team paid for attendees to travel to White House event appeared first on TheGrio.

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Candace Owens group pays for some attendees’ travel to Trump’s White House event

Some guests for Saturday’s White House event on the South Lawn, which will be President Donald Trump’s first since testing positive for the coronavirus, had their travel and lodging paid for by controversial conservative activist Candace Owens’ group BLEXIT, according to emails obtained by ABC News.



Political commentator Candace Owens introduces President Donald Trump, not pictured, during the Young Black Leadership Summit 2019 event in the East Room of the White House in Washington, D.C., Oct. 4, 2019.


© Sarah Silbiger/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Political commentator Candace Owens introduces President Donald Trump, not pictured, during the Young Black Leadership Summit 2019 event in the East Room of the White House in Washington, D.C., Oct. 4, 2019.

Supporters, who are also scheduled to attend a separate BLEXIT event earlier in the day, were invited to attend a “HUGE outdoor rally” by the group and asked to fill out a form that notified them that BLEXIT, a campaign urging Black Americans to leave the Democratic Party, will be covering travel costs.

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Guests were later informed they would be receiving an invitation from the White House to attend an event with Trump.

In an email from Owens, obtained by ABC News, attendees were told “EVERYONE MUST BRING A MASK TO BE ALLOWED ENTRY ONTO THE WHITE HOUSE GROUNDS.” and that “absolutely no exceptions” will be made.

MORE: Trump planning to host 1st in-person event since diagnosis at White House on Saturday: Sources

Still, wearing a face mask will not be required. Attendees will have to submit to a COVID-19 screening the morning of the event, which will consist of a temperature check and a brief questionnaire.

Guests will first attend a “BLEXIT Back the Blue event” on the Ellipse between the White House and the Washington Monument before heading over to the South Lawn for the president’s remarks, according to a schedule obtained by ABC News.

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When reached for comment, Owens told ABC News, “We are not interested in participating in your obvious media angle here to slander/attack the President regarding Covid-19.” She added that Saturday’s event “is about supporting law enforcement in minority communities.” It is not immediately clear how many of those set to attend the event had their travel costs covered.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie standing in a field: President Donald Trump speaks outside the White House, where he is being treated for coronavirus, in Washington, D.C., in this still image taken from social media video released on Oct. 8, 2020.


© @realdonaldtrump via Reuters
President Donald Trump speaks outside the White House, where he is being treated for coronavirus, in Washington, D.C., in this still image taken from social media video released on Oct. 8, 2020.

White House spokesman Judd Deere told ABC News the White House “is not involved in covering any cost.”

Following Trump’s remarks, the BLEXIT group is also planning a demonstration at Black Lives Matter Plaza showing “support for law enforcement,” according to the schedule.

The White House plans to host an event on Saturday featuring Trump with hundreds of supporters and guests from Owens’ group on the South Lawn discussing “law and order,” ABC News previously reported.

MORE: 2nd presidential debate between Biden and Trump canceled

“All attendees must bring a mask

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Candace Owens’ BLEXIT group pays for some attendees’ travel to Trump’s White House event

Attendees were told they “must” wear a BLEXIT shirt, according to emails.

Supporters, who are also scheduled to attend a separate BLEXIT event earlier in the day, were invited to attend a “HUGE outdoor rally” by the group and asked to fill out a form that notified them that BLEXIT, a campaign urging Black Americans to leave the Democratic Party, will be covering travel costs.

Guests were later informed they would be receiving an invitation from the White House to attend an event with Trump.

In an email from Owens, obtained by ABC News, attendees were told “EVERYONE MUST BRING A MASK TO BE ALLOWED ENTRY ONTO THE WHITE HOUSE GROUNDS.” and that “absolutely no exceptions” will be made.

Still, wearing a face mask will not be required. Attendees will have to submit to a COVID-19 screening the morning of the event, which will consist of a temperature check and a brief questionnaire.

Guests will first attend a “BLEXIT Back the Blue event” on the Ellipse between the White House and the Washington Monument before heading over to the South Lawn for the president’s remarks, according to a schedule obtained by ABC News.

When reached for comment, Owens told ABC News, “We are not interested in participating in your obvious media angle here to slander/attack the President regarding Covid-19.” She added that Saturday’s event “is about supporting law enforcement in minority communities.” It is not immediately clear how many of those set to attend the event had their travel costs covered.

PHOTO: President Donald Trump speaks outside the White House, where he is being treated for coronavirus, in Washington, D.C., in this still image taken from social media video released on Oct. 8, 2020.

President Donald Trump speaks outside the White House, where he is being treated for coronavirus, in Washington, D.C., in this still image taken from social media video released on Oct. 8, 2020.

White House spokesman Judd Deere told ABC News the White House “is not involved in covering any cost.”

Following Trump’s remarks, the BLEXIT group is also planning a demonstration at Black Lives Matter Plaza showing “support for law enforcement,” according to the schedule.

The White House plans to host an event on Saturday featuring Trump with hundreds of supporters and guests from Owens’ group on the South Lawn discussing “law and order,” ABC News previously reported.

“All attendees must bring a mask with them and will be instructed to wear it on the White House Complex. All attendees must submit to a COVID-19 screening tomorrow morning. This will consist of a temperature check and a brief questionnaire. The health and safety

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Attendees at Rose Garden ceremony urged to get tested for COVID-19

Oct. 8 (UPI) — Wahington, D.C.’s health department and nine other localities on Thursday called on people who attended a Sept. 26 event at the Rose Garden and others close to the White House to get tested for COVID-19.

The health department and officials from the neighboring states of Maryland and Virginia sent a letter urging anyone who has worked in the White House in the past two weeks, attended the event announcing Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination to the Supreme Court and/or have come in close contact with either of the other two groups to contact their local health departments for information on testing and the potential need to quarantine.

“Given the growing numbers of positive COVID cases reported from staff working in and near the White House, people who attended the event hosted by the White House on Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020, and our preliminary understanding that there has been limited contact tracing performed to date there may be other staff and residents at risk for exposure to COVID positive individuals,” the letter states.

At least seven people who attended the Rose Garden ceremony have tested positive for COVID-18, including President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump, University of Notre Dame President the Rev. John Jenkins, former White House counselor Kellyanne Conway and Republican Sens. Mike Lee of Utah and Thom Tills of North Carolina.

Trump’s campaign manager, Bill Stepien, former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel, White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany, three of McEnany’s deputies and White House senior advisor Stephen Miller have also all tested positive.

President Trump was discharged from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Monday after three days of treatment from COVID-19 and returned to the Oval Office on Wednesday.

Trump’s physician, Dr. Sean Conley, in an update Thursday said the president had “completed his course of therapy for COVID-19” as prescribed by his physicians.

“Since returning home, his physical exam has remained stable and devoid of any indications to suggest progression of illness,” Conley said.

Conley also noted that Saturday would mark 10 days since Trump’s diagnosis last week, stating he fully anticipates “the president’s safe return to public engagements in that time.”

The president’s return to work after testing positive has caused concern about further spread at the White House with other top advisers reportedly leaving to quarantine at home after testing positive or as a precaution to avoid contracting the virus.

On Thursday, Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell, 78, said he had not returned to the White House in just over two months citing its handling of the coronavirus.

“I actually haven’t been to the White House since August the 6th because my impression was their approach to handle this was different than mine and what I insisted that we do in the Senate, which is to wear a mask and practice social distancing,” he said.

McConnell added that he still holds regular phone conversations with Trump.

Scenes from the White House as coronavirus

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DC health department, other localities want White House event attendees to get tested for coronavirus

The Washington, D.C., Department of Health on Thursday released an open letter asking that White House staff and anyone who attended a Sept. 26 event in the Rose Garden contact their health department for guidance on the possible need to quarantine after multiple attendees, including the president, tested positive for COVID.

The letter, co-signed by nine other local health departments from neighboring jurisdictions, indicates a lack of confidence in the White House medical team’s own contact tracing efforts regarding an ongoing virus outbreak that has infected President Donald Trump, multiple senior staff members, and two U.S. senators, among others.

In this Sept. 26, 2020, photo President Donald Trump, center, stands with Judge Amy Coney Barrett as they arrive for a news conference to announce Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington. Former New Jersey Gov. 

In this Sept. 26, 2020, photo President Donald Trump, center, stands with Judge Amy Coney Barrett as they arrive for a news conference to announce Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington. Former New Jersey Gov. 
(AP)

The letter says the public appeal is based on “our preliminary understanding that there has been limited contact tracing performed to date, there may be other staff and residents at risk for exposure to COVID positive individuals.”

It asks individuals who have worked in the White House in the past two weeks, attendees of the Sept. 26 event and anyone who may have been in contact with those people to “contact your local health department for further guidance/questions regarding your potential need to quarantine.”

The letter marks abrupt shift in strategy by Mayor Muriel Bowser’s government, which had previously said it trusted the White House’s robust medical operation to handle its own contact tracing and follow-up. The Democratic mayor said earlier this week that repeated attempts to contact the White House over the outbreak had received a “very cursory” response but that she believed the necessary steps were being taken.

TRUMP ACKNOWLEDGES HE WAS ‘VERY SICK’ WHEN HE WAS HOSPITALIZED FOR COVID

It was not immediately clear whether the letter had been directly sent to any White House employees or people who attended the Sept. 26 event, or if the D.C. government had been provided with a list of attendees.

The letter further shines a spotlight on the Sept. 26 Rose Garden ceremony to introduce Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, Amy Coney Barrett. Multiple attendees, including Trump and Notre Dame University President Rev. John Jenkins, who flew in from Indiana for the ceremony, have now tested positive.

White House spokesman Judd Deere said Monday that the White House “has established a robust contact tracing program led by the White House Medical Unit with CDC integration to provide appropriate recommendations.”

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The District of Columbia has reported 15,765 positive COVID-19 cases, with 634 deaths. Bowser on Wednesday announced she was extending the local state of emergency, which was scheduled to expire Oct. 9, through Dec. 31.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Health officials urge attendees of White House event to get tested for coronavirus

The health officials urged people who worked in the White House in the past two weeks, attended the Supreme Court nomination announcement in the Rose Garden or have had close contact with people who did, to get tested and use their local health departments as a resource. The letter contains contact information for the departments.

“As an additional reminder, if you are identified as a contact, having a negative test does not limit the time period within which you are required to quarantine,” the leaders wrote, citing guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that recommend a 14-day quarantine.

The letter was distributed to people and organizations in each health department’s network, which in D.C. included Advisory Neighborhood Commission members, the D.C. Council and the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments, city officials said.

D.C. Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D) said Wednesday that Nesbitt had spoken with the White House about contact-tracing efforts after the mayor sent a stern letter to the Trump administration seeking cooperation on tracking the outbreak. Nesbitt and the White House began talks on contact-tracing efforts in the region shortly afterward.

In Virginia, Gov. Ralph Northam (D) said Thursday he is allocating $220 million in federal coronavirus aid to help public schools handle their response to the pandemic.

The money will be divided among the state’s 135 school districts to pay for testing supplies, personal protective gear, sanitizing, long-distance learning efforts and other expenses.

“Students, teachers, principals and parents are going to great lengths to navigate the COVID-19 pandemic amid a new school year, and we must do everything we can to support them,” Northam said in a statement.

The money will be drawn from about $1.3 billion in federal Cares Act funding that remains from the roughly $3.1 billion sent to the state earlier this year. It will be distributed based on enrollment, at a rate of $175 per pupil or a minimum of $100,000 for each school division, the governor’s office said.

The spending supplements $238.6 million in Cares Act funding that Virginia’s public K-12 schools received in May. The state’s colleges and universities received $343.9 million, also in May, while another $66.8 million in federal Governor’s Emergency Education Relief funding was split between K-12 schools and higher education institutions.

Northam’s decision to send the money to public schools comes as the General Assembly is working to finish changes to the state budget in response to the pandemic during a special legislative session.

The House of Delegates and state Senate adopted spending plans that call for $200 million in Cares Act money for K-12 schools as they combat the virus. Northam has clashed with lawmakers over spending priorities, warning state lawmakers in a letter Wednesday that he would not sign a budget that restricts his ability to manage Virginia’s virus response efforts.

In Maryland, a scheduled public appearance with Gov. Larry Hogan (R) was postponed Thursday to avoid a possible exposure to the coronavirus.

The event was meant to celebrate the Associated Builders

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Pence Defends Amy Coney Barrett Rose Garden Event Because It Was Outside And ‘Many’ Attendees Were Tested Beforehand

Topline

With Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination ceremony at the White House increasingly looking like a superspreader event of coronavirus infections, Vice President Mike Pence defended the gathering Wednesday at the vice presidential candidates’ debate, arguing that it was outdoors and attendees were tested beforehand—but there was a portion of the event held indoors and health experts say testing or being outdoors doesn’t mean attendees should disregard safety guidelines on social distancing and wearing masks.

Key Facts

Pence said “many people” at the ceremony were tested for coronavirus and “it was an outdoor event, which all of our scientists regularly and routinely advise.”

But that isn’t entirely true because there was a smaller reception inside the White House, and at both that and the outdoor gathering in the Rose Garden, most attendees failed to wear masks and gathered together in close proximity.

Health experts also say a negative test doesn’t mean people should stop social distancing or wearing masks since it can sometimes take up to a week between first exposure and a positive test result.

When asked by moderator Susan Page why Americans should follow coronavirus safety guidelines when the White House hasn’t, Pence said that Americans will choose to do the right thing if given the facts.

Crucial Quote

“That Rose Garden event, there’s a great deal of speculation about it. My wife Karen and I were honored to be there. Many people that were at that event, Susan, were tested for coronavirus and it was an outdoor event, which all of our scientists regularly and routinely advise. The difference here is that President Trump and I trust the American people to make choices in the best interest of their health,” Pence said.

Key Background

At least 11 people who attended the nomination ceremony have tested positive.

Full coverage and live updates on the Coronavirus

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White House Forgoes Contact Tracing Of Attendees At Rose Garden Ceremony

The White House had resisted an offer from the CDC. Health officials are concerned the event might turn into a super-spreader. So far, 30 people in the Trump circle have tested positive.


The New York Times:
White House Is Not Contact Tracing ‘Super-Spreader’ Trump Rose Garden Event


Despite almost daily disclosures of new coronavirus infections among President Trump’s close associates, the White House is making little effort to investigate the scope and source of its outbreak. The White House has decided not to trace the contacts of guests and staff members at the Rose Garden celebration 10 days ago for Judge Amy Coney Barrett, where at least eight people, including the president, may have become infected, according to a White House official familiar with the plans. (Mandavilli and Tully, 10/5)


The Wall Street Journal:
White House Hasn’t Asked CDC Investigators For Covid-19 Case Tracking Help 


The White House hasn’t called on the nation’s top disease detectives to investigate a Covid-19 outbreak involving the president and several staff, though a team has been mobilized specifically for that work, according to people familiar with the matter. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has readied a team of investigators but hasn’t been asked by the White House to help track down related infections since President Trump announced early Friday he and the first lady tested positive for the new coronavirus, these people said. A federal official said the CDC has been on standby. (McKay, Ballhaus and Abbott, 10/5)


Politico:
Riverside Megachurch Pastor Who Attended White House Event Contracts Covid-19


The evangelical pastor of a high-profile California megachurch with links to President Trump announced Monday he’s among those who have contracted Covid-19 following the recent White House event for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett. Pastor Greg Laurie of Riverside’s Harvest Christian Fellowship confirmed on his Facebook page that he tested positive for the virus over the weekend. (Marinucci, 10/5)

In related news —


Vox:
White House Ignores CDC Covid-19 Quarantine Guidelines Despite Virus Cluster


President Donald Trump’s press secretary, Kayleigh McEnany, on Monday revealed she was the latest top official in the White House’s Covid-19 cluster to test positive for the coronavirus. She said in a statement that she “will begin the quarantine process.” But if McEnany had been following Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines, she would have quarantined days ago — when she found out she was a close contact for Hope Hicks, an aide to Trump who had already tested positive. McEnany isn’t the only person in the federal government setting a poor example, with Republican policymakers ranging from Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-IA) to Attorney General Bill Barr to Vice President Mike Pence saying they won’t quarantine despite potential close contact with at least one person who tested positive for the

Read more

9 attendees at SCOTUS nomination Rose Garden event test positive for COVID-19

A week ago, several top White House officials mingled with guests in the Rose Garden as President Donald Trump officially nominated Amy Coney Barrett to replace Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court.

Many of those guests were seen not wearing masks, fist bumping and greeting one another in close proximity, and their seats didn’t appear to be 6 feet apart.

PHOTO: White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany, Oct. 4, 2020, at the White House in Washington.

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany, Oct. 4, 2020, at the White House in Washington.

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany, Oct. 4, 2020, at the White House in Washington.

On the following Monday, nine days after the event, White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany confirmed she had tested positive, becoming the ninth person who attended the affair to become infected. She said she had no symptoms and it wasn’t clear how she might have caught the virus.

On the previous Friday, Utah Sen. Mike Lee, also at the Rose Garden, announced he had tested positive for COVID-19 after experiencing “symptoms consistent with longtime allergies.”

Lee said he took a test only a few days ago “while visiting the White House,” which came back negative. He said he will “remain isolated for the next 10 days” and “will be back to work in time” to pursue Barrett’s nomination.

Prior to her judgeship, Barrett made a name for herself at Notre Dame Law School, also her alma mater. During her 2017 confirmation process, her Notre Dame Law colleagues penned a glowing – and unanimous – endorsement letter.

University of Notre Dame President Rev. John Jenkins was also at the Rose Garden event and also announced Friday he had tested positive for the virus.

In a statement

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Pictured: Attendees of White House SCOTUS nomination ceremony who tested positive for coronavirus

The late fall afternoon was lovely. The scene at a packed White House Rose Garden to formally announce a conservative replacement for the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was jubilant. Republican senators, leading conservatives and dozens of President Trump’s top supporters and aides hugged and cheered as Trump introduced Amy Coney Barrett on Sept. 26.

[Visual timeline of Trump’s movements before his positive coronavirus test]

The ceremony, which included indoor receptions in addition to the outdoor announcement, is drawing scrutiny as a possible superspreader event as a coronavirus outbreak continues to spread through official Washington.

At least eight people who attended have tested positive for the virus. Trump is hospitalized with the disease it causes. Many of those who caught the infection were seated closely together. Scroll to see who else attended the ceremony.

Tested positive

President Trump

President Trump stands with Amy Coney Barrett on Sept. 26 as they arrive to announce Barrett as a nominee to the Supreme Court.
President Trump stands with Amy Coney Barrett on Sept. 26 as they arrive to announce Barrett as a nominee to the Supreme Court. (Alex Brandon/AP)

First lady Melania Trump

President Donald Trump, center, stands with Judge Amy Coney Barrett as they arrive for a news conference to announce Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden at the White House, Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
President Donald Trump, center, stands with Judge Amy Coney Barrett as they arrive for a news conference to announce Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden at the White House, Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) (Alex Brandon/AP)

Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah)

President Donald Trump, center, stands with Judge Amy Coney Barrett as they arrive for a news conference to announce Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden at the White House, Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
President Donald Trump, center, stands with Judge Amy Coney Barrett as they arrive for a news conference to announce Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden at the White House, Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) (Alex Brandon/AP)

The Rev. John I. Jenkins, the University of Notre Dame’s president

President Donald Trump, center, stands with Judge Amy Coney Barrett as they arrive for a news conference to announce Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden at the White House, Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
President Donald Trump, center, stands with Judge Amy Coney Barrett as they arrive for a news conference to announce Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden at the White House, Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) (Alex Brandon/AP)

Kellyanne Conway

President Donald Trump, center, stands with Judge Amy Coney Barrett as they arrive for a news conference to announce Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden at the White House, Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
President Donald Trump, center, stands with Judge Amy Coney Barrett as they arrive for a news conference to announce Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden at the White House, Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) (Alex Brandon/AP)

Sen. Thom Tillis (R-N.C.)

President Donald Trump, center, stands with Judge Amy Coney Barrett as they arrive for a news conference to announce Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden at the White House, Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
President Donald Trump, center, stands with Judge Amy Coney Barrett as they arrive for a news conference to announce Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden at the White House, Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) (Alex Brandon/AP)

Chris Christie

President Donald Trump, center, stands with Judge Amy Coney Barrett as they arrive for a news conference to announce Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden at the White House, Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
President Donald Trump, center, stands with Judge Amy Coney Barrett as they arrive for a news conference to announce Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden at the White House, Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) (Alex Brandon/AP)

Tested negative

Vice President Pence and Karen Pence

President Donald Trump, center, stands with Judge Amy Coney Barrett as they arrive for a news conference to announce Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden at the White House, Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
President Donald Trump,
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