Colorado Springs artist creates secret garden in new exhibit | Arts & Entertainment

What lurks below a thriving garden might be even more beautiful.

Liz McCombs has spent months building a secret garden in her studio. What has emerged are ceramic and mixed-media humanlike sculptures all caught in the mysterious process of metamorphosis. Greenery sprouts up out of curled-up human figures; rootlike vegetables have grown heads sporting full lips and round eyes; and femalelike figures are given tangled roots for legs while lush gardens push up out of their skulls.


Popular ghost stories walking tours in Manitou Springs expanding this Halloween season

Her pieces start with kiln-fired ceramic to which she adds recycled materials, such as wood, bark and pieces of glass.

“A key element of the show was transformation from one thing to something else,” says the longtime Colorado Springs artist. “In the garden you have birth, death, one thing nourishing something else, all things that make life life. I incorporate those ideas into each of the pieces. Each one has a unique story. They all fall under the overreaching idea of transition.”

“Secret Garden” is open now at Bridge Gallery. You can see the show from noon to 3 p.m. Saturdays through October. McCombs also will be working in the gallery throughout the month. Also on display will be a series of Halloween-inspired pieces, some influenced by the Day of the Dead Mexican holiday.

McCombs, an avid gardener, has always been fascinated by the cycle of life under the surface, and in this case, the garden. A simple seed is planted, watered and nourished with loving care and attention. How will that seed grow? What will it become? The possibilities are endless.

“It’s like the acorn turning into an oak tree,” she says. “I like the revealed and concealed idea. There are secrets inside all things and if given the right nutrients and space and time to grow, anything can happen.”

And how might that apply to human life? Very much the same. To grow, one must allow for new paths and new ideas to take root, which means others must die to make room. There’s a natural letting go that we can either nurture or resist.

As you might guess, McCombs is in favor of weeding out the old to make room for the new. It’s a theme that winds through her life. She eschews the idea of planning out what your life should look like, and instead allowing for the magic of the unknown to flow through.

“Unfortunately, when you have an idea in your mind of what you should be or what your life should be, you don’t leave any room for the possibility of anything greater than that dream,” she says. “If you think ‘If I have this then I’ll be happy’ is so limiting. We never know what’s out there and could be greater than anything you imagined.”

McCombs was a maker practically right out of the womb, she says. Recently, her mother found old pieces of her art labeled “Liz, age 4.” And even in

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Cottonmouth restaurant in Village of the Arts announces opening date


Cottonmouth is the newest restaurant by Chef David Shiplett, who also owns Birdrock Taco Shack, around the corner in Bradenton’s Village of the Arts.

Wade Tatangelo
 
| Sarasota Herald-Tribune

BRADENTON – The most highly anticipated Sarasota-Manatee restaurant opening to be planned since the start of the pandemic should take place a bit earlier than expected.

Chef/owner David Shiplett aims to unveil Cottonmouth Southern Soul Kitchen to the public Sept. 30 after announcing earlier this summer he would open in October. The restaurant occupies a historic cottage on the main road through Bradenton’s Village of the Arts, near Shiplett’s other eatery Birdrock Taco Shack. 

A casual dining destination, Cottonmouth has indoor seating adored with local artwork as well as al fresco options including a spacious, fenced in backyard area with sprawling trees providing shade and dangling Edison lights. There will also be a covered stage in the back, too, where musicians will begin performing when Sunday brunch launches with the Brown Bag Brass Band on Nov. 8, followed by nationally acclaimed Bradenton-based blues artist Doug Deming on Nov. 15.

Cottonmouth’s tightly constructed menu focuses on Dixieland dishes such as fried green tomatoes, collard greens, and shrimp and cheese grits. “Those are the three things I knew I needed to have on the menu when I started thinking about the concept,” Shiplett said earlier this week. “And fried chicken. I also knew I had to have fried chicken.” 

Before attending California Culinary Academy, before working at fine-dining establishments such as Michael’s On East in Sarasota and the old Poseidon on Longboat Key, before opening Bradenton restaurants Ezra and Soma, and before opening Birdrock Taco Shack five years ago; Shiplett began his culinary career at a Kentucky Fried Chicken located just a few miles from where he was born, at Manatee Memorial Hospital in Bradenton 61 years ago.

“KFC was the first restaurant I worked at, at age 15, making two dollar hours, and I was lucky, I had friends working at other restaurants making $1.60 an hour in the early ’70s,” Shiplett said with a laugh. “I got to meet the (Colonel Harland Sanders) twice and I was awestruck. And I always wanted to do fried chicken, but, I wanted it to be worthy of the Colonel, you know?”

Gazing at the new Cottonmouth menu, one’s eyes are immediately are pulled to the Big Plates section and the Cast Iron Southern Fried Chicken Breast dish that comes with collard greens and mac and cheese.

“Uncle Jim, before he passed away, gave me a whole collection of cast iron, a lot that he used over an open flame,” Shiplett said. “And ever since he gave it to me I knew it was the perfect vehicle to cook chicken in; at a nice low temperature, after doing a buttermilk brine overnight so that it’s tender and juicy.”

Other Big Plates include the Bradentucky Meatloafburger with melted cheddar and tomato on Texas toast served with a side of tater tots. While Shiplett originally planned to

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In-person art returns to Garden City Arts – News – The Topeka Capital-Journal

GARDEN CITY–After a few trial runs, some of the adult, in-person classes resumed at Garden City Arts in August, but information about the classes was not publicly known until mid-September.

Katy Guthrie, executive director of Garden City Arts, said the reopening of classes was not publicly announced earlier because they wanted to make sure they could be done in a safe manner.

“The first class we only had six participants, but that was absolutely fine, because it gave us a good sense of how many we could fit in the space comfortably and safely,” she said. “We had three in-person classes in August and both went very well.”

So far only two adult programs have resumed in-person — Blushing Artiste and Acrylic Pour, Guthrie said. They’re the programs they were confident could be restarted safely.

The classes look different now than they did pre-COVID-19, Guthrie said. Teachers and participants are required to wear masks and everyone is at their own desk 6 feet apart.

Classes sizes have also shrunk, Guthrie said. Prior to COVID-19, they had more seating and up to 20 people per class.

“We’re down to a maximum of eight to 10, so we cut our class sizes in half, and we’re really making sure that everyone feels comfortable,” she said.

Additionally, instructors are encouraged to check with participants before approaching or handling supplies, Guthrie said. They want to make sure no one feels like their space is being invaded and that they feel safe.

In particular to the reopened classes, Blushing Artiste, a paint class, looks different in that refreshments are no longer offered and it is only held once a month.

Guthrie said Arcylic Pour has changed little, as it’s a class that feels like it was made in response to COVID-19.

“Everyone kind of works at their own pace and at their own station and does their own thing after a very quick demo,” she said.

Cleaning has also been stepped up in the classrooms, Guthrie said.

“All brushes are sanitized in between classes, that’s why we don’t have back-to-back classes anymore, to ensure that supplies are not being handled by the same person,” she said. “We’re making sure that everyone has their own supplies. We also thoroughly clean surfaces that are heavy traffic areas, just to ensure everyone’s safety.”

One big change to in-person classes is that pre-enrollment is now required, Guthrie said. Walk-ins are accepted if there is room, but with a limited class size, it’s unlikely.

For more information, visit gardencityarts.org.

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The Garden & Arts Center 50th annual Fall Arts & Crafts Festival

LUBBOCK, Texas (KCBD) – The 50th Annual Fall Arts & Crafts Festival will take place Saturday, September 12, 2020, from 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. on the front lawn of the Garden & Arts Center.



a close up of text on a white background: 50th Annual Fall Festival


© Provided by Lubbock KCBD
50th Annual Fall Festival

Join as they celebrate 50 years of family-fun. The new booth layout allows for proper social distancing, so that everyone can have a fun and safe time.

Masks will be required on festival grounds.

This event features more than 50 vendors selling handmade craft items and fine art. Fall Festival features live entertainment, food trucks, and free arts and crafts for the kids.

The Lubbock Municipal Garden & Arts Center strives to offer an array of fun and comprehensive classes and events for all ages, from basic classes in painting, drawing and photography, to specialized classes such as stained glass, jewelry making and faux finishing.

The center is located at 4215 University Avenue. For more information on classes or reservations please call the Lubbock Municipal Garden & Arts Center at (806) 767-3724, email [email protected] or visit our web site at www.lubbockgac.org.

Copyright 2020 KCBD. All rights reserved.

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Duke and Duchess of Sussex meet with Sir Elton John’s interior designer | Arts & Entertainment

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex have been meeting with Sir Elton John’s interior designer to discuss redecorating their Californian home.

The couple – who have 15-month-old son Archie together – recently splashed out on a nine-bedroom abode in Santa Barbara and were put in touch with Martyn Lawrence Bullard by their pop star pal to discuss their vision for their family residence.

A source told the Mail on Sunday newspaper: “Elton put Harry and Meg in touch with Martyn after they moved to LA. They had a meeting and got on really well. Martyn was really helpful on where they should be house-hunting and what kind of properties.

“Some of his interiors are outrageous and over the top, but he’s also great at working out exactly what the client wants and delivering it.”

As well as working on Elton and his husband David Furnish’s Los Angeles apartment, Martyn also counts Kylie Jenner, Cher, Sharon and Ozzy Osbourne, and designer Tommy Hilfiger among his clients.

A source said: “Martyn’s very popular and successful with all the big Hollywood stars. His taste is very extravagant and he doesn’t come cheap, but the end result is breathtaking.”

The royal couple are also believed to have been consulting with James Corden’s wife Julia and her business partner Vicky Charles – who helped redesign their UK residence, Frogmore Cottage in Windsor – about their plans for their new home.

Harry and Meghan’s new home – which they moved into in July – is set in five acres of grounds, and as well as its nine bedrooms, it also has 16 bathrooms, a library, office, spa with a separate dry and wet sauna, gym, game room, arcade, theatre, wine cellar and five-car garage, and has been updated with the latest Lutron lighting systems and Crestron, including iPad control.

The stunning grounds boast ancient olive trees, rose gardens, a tennis court, a tea house, children’s cottage and a pool.

There is also a two-bedroom guest house, and for added privacy, there are multiple access gates before anyone can get near the abode.

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