Cavalier White House approach to COVID catches up to Trump

Video: Trump suffering from ‘mild’ Covid-19 symptoms (PA Media)

Trump suffering from ‘mild’ Covid-19 symptoms

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

WASHINGTON (AP) — Masks were rarely spotted in the West Wing. Crowds of people gathered shoulder to shoulder on the White House South Lawn. And Air Force One streaked across the sky from one massive campaign rally to another.



President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at Harrisburg International Airport, Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020, in Middletown, Pa. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)


© Provided by Associated Press
President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at Harrisburg International Airport, Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020, in Middletown, Pa. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)

With ready access to testing and the best public health minds at his disposal, President Donald Trump should have been the American safest from COVID-19. Instead, he flouted his own government’s guidelines and helped create a false sense of invulnerability in the White House, an approach that has now failed him as it did a nation where more than 200,000 people have died.

Marine One, the presidential helicopter, lifted off Friday to take Trump to a military hospital from the same White House lawn that less than a week earlier had been the site of his celebratory nomination of a new Supreme Court justice as he charged toward the November election.

Several people at the event, including a U.S. senator, have since tested positive for the coronavirus. Trump is now ensconsed at Walter Reed Medical Center after running a fever and feeling fatigued following his early-morning revelation that he had tested positive for the virus.



President Donald Trump adjusts the microphone after he announced Judge Amy Coney Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden at the White House, Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)


© Provided by Associated Press
President Donald Trump adjusts the microphone after he announced Judge Amy Coney Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden at the White House, Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

“He let the country down by disregarding the CDC, ignoring federal guidelines and acting like he was Superman,” said presidential historian David Brinkley. “He did not just downplay the virus, he paraded around like a peacock, making fun of those who took it seriously.”

From the pandemic’s early days, Trump, by his own admission, played down the severity of the virus. He repeatedly suggested it would “disappear” and for a while was pushing for the American economy to fully reopen by Easter, just a month after the pandemic fully engulfed the nation.

And he soon began resisting the advice of public health experts on his own coronavirus task force, including Dr. Anthony Fauci and Dr. Deborah Birx. He publicly clashed with the heads of the Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention over everything from the risks associated with opening schools to the timetable for a potential COVID-19 vaccine.



President Donald Trump speaks about coronavirus testing strategy, in the Rose Garden of the White House, Monday, Sept. 28, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)


© Provided by Associated Press
President Donald Trump speaks about coronavirus testing strategy, in the Rose Garden of the White House, Monday, Sept. 28, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Those on the White House staff dared not break with the president, who wanted to embody a nation on the way back, not one fixated with health guidelines that would remind a nervous

Read more

Barr’s Approach Closes Gap Between Justice Dept. and White House

WASHINGTON — When the top federal prosecutor in Washington recently accused the local police of arresting protesters without probable cause, Attorney General William P. Barr stepped in.

Mr. Barr, who has frequently voiced his support for police officers, brought in the U.S. attorney, Michael Sherwin, to meet with the chief of the Washington police and other top law enforcement officials, escalating the local dispute to the top of the Justice Department.

The meeting grew heated, but ultimately, Mr. Sherwin backed down, according to three people familiar with the encounter. Mr. Barr told Mr. Sherwin to write a letter that said he had not meant to imply that the police had acted unlawfully. In a nod to Mr. Sherwin’s original objection, the Washington police are working with prosecutors to identify video and other evidence to back up the arrests.

The episode was an example of Mr. Barr’s approach to running the Justice Department under President Trump: an agenda that is squarely in line not only with the White House but also with the Trump campaign’s law-and-order platform and assertions that Democrats have made the United States less safe. Critics argued that the department’s norm of independence from politics, widely seen as an anticorruption measure that grew out of the post-Watergate era, was at risk.

Mr. Barr has threatened legal action against Democratic leaders who sparred with the president over stay-at-home orders during the pandemic and echoed Mr. Trump’s accusation that they were not tough enough on protesters during nationwide unrest over race and policing. He led federal agents who patrolled the streets of Washington against the wishes of the mayor. And this week, the Justice Department seemed to play into the president’s efforts to undermine voting by mail, making an unusual disclosure about an investigation into nine discarded military mail-in ballots in Pennsylvania.

In public comments, Mr. Barr has expounded on topics outside of what recent attorneys general publicly discussed during an election, particularly his sharp critiques of Democrats and his grim pronouncements that they could destroy democracy. In a recent interview with a Chicago journalist, after acknowledging that he is not supposed to wade into politics but narrowly defining that as campaign appearances, Mr. Barr declared that the country would “go down a socialist path” if it elects former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr.

Under Mr. Barr, the Justice Department is as close as it has been to the White House in a half-century, historians said. Not since John N. Mitchell steered the Nixon re-election effort from the fifth floor of the Justice Department has an attorney general wielded the power of the office to so bluntly serve a presidential campaign, they said.

“The norm has been that attorneys general try to keep the reputation of the department bright and shiny as a nonpartisan legitimate arm of the government that needs to be trusted by everyone,” said Andrew Rudalevige, a history professor at Bowdoin College who studies the power of the presidency.

A Justice Department spokeswoman declined to comment.

Read more

Dan Pearson’s Japanese forest garden offers a fresh and sensitive approach to horticulture

She writes: “When we grow perennials, we sometimes meet a moment of chaos… Chaos can be romantic in the garden, but on the other hand it can soon look tired. We enjoy the time we have had with the plants so far and then we make a bold step change at the right time for the garden.”

A reverence for the right time permeates the Millennium Garden. As part of her training, Shintani worked as a traditional gardener, where she learned “self-discipline, diligence and devotion”. This ethic underpins everything carried out at Tokachi.

Gardeners often carry out tasks silently, in awe of the mountains that dominate the landscape. There is, too, a constant awareness of every season. We are familiar with the idea that cherry blossom is celebrated in Japan, but the 72 seasonal changes recorded in the ancient Japanese calendar provide regular prompts to respect the beauty of evanescence.

Throughout the turning year, there is a phrase for each five-day shift: “The earthworms rise, The plums turn yellow, white dew on the grass.” This close observation is a constant reminder of the passing of time, of the coming of death to us all.

But each natural change is also a cause for celebration. Under the veranda of the Garden Café is a display table, an encouragement to look closely at an arrangement of whatever foliage, flowers, or produce is in season.

Pearson has brought home much of what he has absorbed from Tokachi. In his West Country base at Hillside, the land is worked only enough to support the life he shares with his partner, Huw Morgan, who acted as editorial and creative director of this beautiful book. (Commitment to the Japanese aesthetic was also shared by Julie Weiss, the book’s designer.)

Pearson says that through the experience, “we have learnt to prize the small and the fleeting”. At this time of year, pears are gathered and spaced out on a wooden table. Dahlias are picked, each in its own small vase for closer inspection.

Satoyama is practised in the garden, where a dialogue is being established with nature that aims for balance and diversity. At Hillside, repetitive tasks are celebrated, the pace of life is slower and modest undiscovered beauty waits to be revealed. The influence of Japan has been potent.

Tokachi Millennium Forest by Dan Pearson (£40, Filbert Press). Order your copy from books.telegraph.co.uk. 

How to establish a little eco-system

Source Article

Read more

‘Victory Garden’ Approach Could Aid AI Effort > U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE > Defense Department News

Americans bolstered the war effort during World War II by planting “victory gardens.” Every citizen’s small contribution to the war effort added up to a lot of support. The same can be done to further the Defense Department’s efforts to advance artificial intelligence, said the acting director of the Joint Artificial Intelligence Center.

“The first step in doing this involves thinking critically about the work that you do,” said Nand Mulchandani yesterday during the opening session at the DOD AI Symposium. “Can you do it more efficiently? Can you rethink it? Could it benefit from automation, analytics or predictive capabilities? Is it ‘data-rich?’ If so, it might be a perfect candidate to build your own AI victory garden around.”

Mulchandani said DOD employees can plant “technological seeds” by learning more about AI, defining areas within their own work environment where AI could help solve problems, developing business strategies to implement AI capabilities, organizing and preserving data, starting an AI project, and sharing lessons learned from their own AI efforts with others across the department.

“The good news is that you’ll have support from the JAIC and the AI community that we’re building across the government, industry and academia,” Mulchandani said.

The JAIC was begun in 2018 to accelerate DOD’s adoption and integration of AI. From the start, Mulchandani said, the JAIC was meant to serve as an AI center of excellence and to provide resources, tools and expertise to the department.

Today, the JAIC is involved in pathfinder technology projects, coordinating with industry and academia on AI, training and education, AI governance and policy, testing and evaluation, international engagement, and AI ethics implementation.

While the mission of the JAIC is broad and far-reaching, Mulchandani said the JAIC alone can’t make AI happen across the department.

“This is a massive effort and is one that the JAIC embraces because we understand that all of these initiatives will help create the conditions for us to achieve victory with AI,” he said. “But we cannot do this alone … no single organization can tackle the challenges of fielding AI on their own — it will take our entire community.”

Source Article

Read more

Defense Department Official Says ‘Victory Garden’ Approach Could Aid AI Effort > U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE > Defense Department News

Americans bolstered the war effort during World War II by planting “victory gardens.” Every citizen’s small contribution to the war effort added up to a lot of support. The same can be done to further the Defense Department’s efforts to advance artificial intelligence, said the acting director of the Joint Artificial Intelligence Center.

“The first step in doing this involves thinking critically about the work that you do,” said Nand Mulchandani yesterday during the opening session at the DOD AI Symposium. “Can you do it more efficiently? Can you rethink it? Could it benefit from automation, analytics or predictive capabilities? Is it ‘data-rich?’ If so, it might be a perfect candidate to build your own AI victory garden around.”

Mulchandani said DOD employees can plant “technological seeds” by learning more about AI, defining areas within their own work environment where AI could help solve problems, developing business strategies to implement AI capabilities, organizing and preserving data, starting an AI project, and sharing lessons learned from their own AI efforts with others across the department.

“The good news is that you’ll have support from the JAIC and the AI community that we’re building across the government, industry and academia,” Mulchandani said.

The JAIC was begun in 2018 to accelerate DOD’s adoption and integration of AI. From the start, Mulchandani said, the JAIC was meant to serve as an AI center of excellence and to provide resources, tools and expertise to the department.

Today, the JAIC is involved in pathfinder technology projects, coordinating with industry and academia on AI, training and education, AI governance and policy, testing and evaluation, international engagement, and AI ethics implementation.

While the mission of the JAIC is broad and far-reaching, Mulchandani said the JAIC alone can’t make AI happen across the department.

“This is a massive effort and is one that the JAIC embraces because we understand that all of these initiatives will help create the conditions for us to achieve victory with AI,” he said. “But we cannot do this alone … no single organization can tackle the challenges of fielding AI on their own — it will take our entire community.”

Source Article

Read more

Why to Ditch the DIY Approach and Hire a Professional Interior Designer

Plus, there is always the risk of work not turning out the way it's intended. After all, designers have years of experience of the domain and know how to manage spaces perfectly and create visual difference to structures of any type. When you take it upon yourself to beautify your interior or rooms, there will always be a lack of knowledge on your part in how to get the best results.

Hiring a professional interior designer has a variety of benefits, including –

Perfect handling of project of any scale

Experts have a complete familiarity with the art of interior designing and they can create the difference to spaces of any type and magnitude. With them, you are sure of perfect handling of your project regardless of its size and scale. It will also not matter whether yours is a residential or commercial property, top designers know how to use different design elements in a perfect proportion to ensure desired results.

Accurate selection of design elements

The process of interior designing involves a big selection and choices of different design elements such as styles, patterns, colors, hues, light and so on. There will always be a concern in regard to the subtle use of rugs, wall hangings and flooring, which collectively add value to the home interior. Professional designers are familiar with the right kind of shades and hues to be used for interior and bring right results.

Implementation of all your wants and needs

When homeowners hire a professional designer, they know that all their wants and needs will be met easily. They can be sure of two styles to be matched and blended together to create the kind of visual dazzle desires for spaces. They know a lot about the space and flow and circulation together with studying the spaces and coming up with solutions in a right manner. They can create spaces in precisely the way needed.

Knowledge to customize your space

Professional designers have an in-depth knowledge of how to create spaces that suit individuals and families with varied tastes. You can convey your specifications easily and expect to get customized spaces that are a blend of beauty and efficiency. More so, they not only help produce an aesthetically pleasing spaces but also ensure a sense of functionality to help realize the designing goals easily.

A trusted team of contractors for help

You can expect a top interior designer to have a team of contractors to do works like painting, flooring, layout planning, lighting arrangement, etc. They have a links and associations with vendors for furniture, fabric etc. to convert your wishes into a shape of reality. This is how the task of interior designing is done with effortless ease and you can hope to get beautiful spaces carved out with perfection.

Source Article

Read more