White House physician walks back a confusing timeline of Trump’s coronavirus infection that implied he was diagnosed days before announcing his test results



a man wearing a suit and tie: President Donald Trump disembarks from the Marine One helicopter followed by White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows as he arrives at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after the White House announced that he "will be working from the presidential offices at Walter Reed for the next few days" after testing positive for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), Joshua Roberts/Reuters


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President Donald Trump disembarks from the Marine One helicopter followed by White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows as he arrives at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after the White House announced that he “will be working from the presidential offices at Walter Reed for the next few days” after testing positive for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), Joshua Roberts/Reuters

White House physician Sean Conley offered a new timeline for the president’s coronavirus infection during a press briefing Saturday morning. He later walked back the statement.

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Conley held the briefing to review President Donald Trump’s condition after he was hospitalized at Walter Reed Medical Center on Friday evening. The physician said Trump’s condition had improved, but he also said the president’s COVID-19 infection had been identified a day earlier than previously thought.

“Just 72 hours into the diagnosis now,” Conley said. “The first week of COVID, and in particular days 7 to 10, are the most critical in determining the likely course of this illness.”

That would mean that Trump had been diagnosed on Wednesday.

Dr. Brian Garibaldi, a physician on the team caring for the president at Walter Reed, also said that Trump had received an experimental antibody treatment “48 hours ago,” which would be roughly Thursday morning.

This was a different timeline than the one constructed by incremental statements from the White House. Trump announced his positive test results early Friday morning, and the White House disclosed his experimental antibody treatment later that day.

When asked to clarify, Conley contradicted his earlier statement.

“Thursday afternoon following the news of a close contact is when we repeated testing, and given kind of clinical indications had a little bit more concern. And that’s when late that night we got the PCR confirmation that he was [positive],” he said.

Shortly after the briefing, Conley released a statement retracting his initial timeline from the press briefing, saying he “incorrectly” said 72 hours instead of “day three” and 48 hours instead of “day two.” (Even though Garibaldi said “48 hours,” not Conley himself.)

“The President was first diagnosed with COVID-19 on the evening of Thursday, October 1st and had received Regeron’s antibody cocktail on Friday, October 2nd,” the statement said.

The company that makes the antibody treatment is called Regeneron.

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Utah Sen. Mike Lee tests positive for coronavirus 5 days after attending White House event announcing Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett



Mike Lee et al. standing in front of a cake: Judge Amy Coney Barrett, President Donald Trump's nominee to the Supreme Court, meets with Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, at the Capito on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2020. Al Drago/Pool via AP


© Al Drago/Pool via AP
Judge Amy Coney Barrett, President Donald Trump’s nominee to the Supreme Court, meets with Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, at the Capito on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2020. Al Drago/Pool via AP

  • Sen. Mike Lee said on Twitter on Friday that he has tested positive for COVID-19 after experiencing what he thought were “longtime allergies.”
  • “Unlike the test I took just a few days ago while visiting the White House, yesterday’s test came back positive,” the Republican senator from Utah wrote.
  • Lee attended a ceremony at the White House on Saturday during which President Donald Trump announced that Judge Amy Coney Barrett is his Supreme Court nominee. 
  • Pictures from the event show a tightly packed crowd of people, many of whom weren’t wearing masks, instead shaking hands and hugging each other.
  • Lee also met with Barrett on Capitol Hill on Tuesday and returned for a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Wednesday. He was seen maskless both times.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Sen. Mike Lee, a Republican from Utah, announced on Friday that he has tested positive for the coronavirus.

“Yesterday morning, I was experiencing symptoms consistent with longtime allergies,” Lee wrote on Twitter. “Out of an abundance of caution, I sought medical advice and was tested for Covid-19.”

“Unlike the test I took just a few days ago while visiting the White House, yesterday’s test came back positive,” he added.

Lee said that he plans to isolate himself for the next 10 days, based on advice from a physician. “Like so many other Utans, I will now spend part of 2020 working from home,” he said.

Lee noted, however, that he plans to be “back to work to join my Judiciary Committee colleagues in advancing the Supreme Court nomination of Jude Amy Coney Barrett.”

Lee attended a ceremony at the White House on Saturday during which President Donald Trump announced Barrett’s selection. 

Images from the event show a large crowd with no social distancing and many people not wearing face masks. Some attendees hugged, bumped elbows, and shook hands with each other. Footage from CNN shows that Lee did so, too.

Lee met Barrett again on Tuesday, this time on Capitol Hill. Pictures show that neither Barrett nor Lee were wearing face masks or staying six feet away from one another. 

He was photographed, maskless again, at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Wednesday about the FBI’s investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. 

The Senate is expected to begin Barrett’s confirmation hearings on Oct. 12. The staunchly conservative justice has been tapped by Trump to take the place of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg who died on Sept. 18.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and California Sen. Dianne Feinstein reacted to Lee’s diagnoses on Friday, calling it “unfortunate news, according to Bloomberg News reporter Laura Litvan.

“The unfortunate news about the infection of

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