Anatomy of a Kitchen Countertop

The kitchen, being the contemporary centerpiece of every home, requires a countertop which (1.) meets the functional needs of daily cooking preparations and (2.) complements the beauty of the entire area.

Whether you are building a new house or doing a major kitchen renovation, it is important to know a few useful information which will help you decide on the final design of your countertop.

Furthermore, you should intend to have your local supplier install it for you, he or she will most likely ask some of the details which we will discuss in this article. Therefore, it is best to have a list of some of your ideas beforehand. Keep in mind that the installer will charge you accordingly based on the specifications of your project.

The Frontage, the central part of the countertop, is the working area of ​​the kitchen. It is here where we perform mostly the various tasks, such as kneading and chopping. Moreover, it is the surface which absorbs the constant use and abuse of daily meal preparations.

During layout and design, it is important to note that a depth of at least 0.60 meters is required for the countertop's frontage to function efficiently. This figure ensures, too, that there is a sufficient area to work on while allowing enough space to accommodate the sink, the stove top, and some other small kitchen accessories.

A countertop can either be a continuous space or a connection of two or more slabs joined at angled corners. Often, kitchens with an "L-shaped" or a "U-shaped" layout require seams to accommodate the size of the countertop. Alternatively, you may also consider using gangsaw slabs (slabs which have a depth of more than a meter) to minimize the number of seams.

A Backsplash is a vertical panel installed above the frontage of a countertop. It has three essential functions. First, it serves to protect the wall from splatters and blocks spills and drips from seeping behind the cabinet. It helps keep both surfaces clean and dry, which, in turn, prevents mold from growing inside your kitchen.

Second, it hides the gap between the rear end of the countertop and the wall behind it. Considering that most walls, almost always, are not straight, a void becomes inevitable. The backsplash, therefore, covers this particular problem fittingly.

Lastly, it provides a stunning visual treat to anyone in the kitchen. It adds depth, color, and texture in the room. Whether you prefer a 4 ″ high or a full-height backsplash, it surely is worth pairing with your countertop.

The countertop's base is another important factor to consider during the design process. A countertop placed over a wooden cabinet typically requires a Laminated edge profile to hide the substrate supporting the slab. On the other hand, when installed on top of a concrete base or a metal or a stainless steel frame, a Skirting is recommended to conceal the structure underneath.

Planning the location of the sink, the stove top, and, even the wall outlets …

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