Real Salt Lake’s Sam Johnson suspended after alleged shooting at his party

Real Salt Lake forward Sam Johnson was suspended from the team and prohibited from all activities after a shooting took place at a party at his home earlier this month, according to the Salt Lake Tribune.

Johnson, 27, is in his second year with RSL. He was the second-leading scorer on the team last season with nine goals, his first in MLS.

The league is currently investigating the incident. 

“The team and league are aware of the incident and are currently conducting an investigation,” RSL said in a statement, via the Salt Lake Tribune. “In accordance with health and safety protocols, the player is prohibited from engaging in any team-related activity. We will have no further comment until the conclusion of the League’s investigation.”

Johnson allegedly throws house party amid COVID-19

Despite the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, which is trending up across the country, Johnson allegedly threw a house party at his Salt Lake City-area home that about 100 people attended on Oct. 3. Utah has banned gatherings of more than 50 people due to the pandemic.

Per the report, a gunshot was fired early on Oct. 4 that caused “partygoers to scatter.” Johnson wasn’t believed to have been at his home at the time of the gunshot. 

A man with a gunshot wound then showed up to a local hospital hours later with a non-life-threatening injury. The man said he was shot elsewhere and wasn’t cooperative with police about the incident, per the report.

It’s not clear who fired the shot or why.

Johnson is in the second year of his two-year deal with Real Salt Lake. He has scored one goal in 330 minutes so far this season. 

Real Salt Lake forward Sam Johnson
Despite the ongoing pandemic, Sam Johnson allegedly threw a massive house party earlier this month. (Fred Kfoury III/Icon Sportswire/Getty Images)

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Court asks ex-interior minister about PML-N’s alleged links with TTP – Newspaper

PESHAWAR: The Peshawar High Court has sought comments from former interior minister Chaudhry Nisar Ali Khan about a petition, which alleged that the Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz had links with the banned Tehreek-i-Taliban Pakistan and paid money to its chief, Hakeemullah Mehsud, in 2012.

A bench consisting of Chief Justice Waqar Ahmad Seth and Justice Mohammad Nasir Mehfooz also issued notices to the federal and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa governments seeking their replies to the petition on Oct 20 and adjourned the hearing into the petition of freelance journalist Shahid Orakzai until then.

The court observed that as the petitioner alleged that payment to the TTP was made in KP, it would be appropriate to issue a notice to the provincial government as well about it.

The petitioner has requested the high court to ask the government to take legal action against the PML-N leaders, who allegedly paid money to the TTP chief, and investigate the imprisoned associates of Hakeemullah Mehsud over the matter.

He claimed that former spokesperson for TTP Ehsanullah Ehsan was not only a witness to the political and financial links of those politicians with the TTP but he also had developed differences with the TTP leaders over that money.

Notices also issued to govt over petition about terror outfit funding

Mr Orakzai alleged that former interior minister Chaudhry Nisar Ali Khan was fully aware of the 2012 funding in question.

He promised to produce the ‘pictorial evidence’ of the funding in the court during hearing of the case.

The petitioner claimed that the payment of that money had helped influence the 2013 general elections in favour of the PML-N.

He requested the court to decide the petition before any move is made in the National Assembly for the vote of no-confidence against the prime minister.

The respondents in the petition are former TTP spokesman Ehsanullah Ehsan, former interior minister Chaudhry Nisar Ali Khan, and the federal government through the law secretary.

The petitioner said though he didn’t know about the exact amount paid to Hakeemullah Mehsud by the PML-N, he would disclose the ‘political motive behind that transaction’ and produce its evidence during the hearing into the petition.

He further said he would name the man, who had taken that money from Lahore to Waziristan, and that the court could seek a sworn affidavit from that person if he denied his role in the matter.

Mr Orakzai said the high court was also empowered to seek the relevant records from any institution functioning under the federal government if it had conducted any investigation into the issue.

He said the petition was not meant to seek action against that political party under Article 17 of the Constitution and instead, it was filed to let the people know about the illegal acts done by politicians.

The petitioner claimed that the man, who had delivered the money to the TTP, was also tasked in 2013 with compiling the lists of the imprisoned TTP militants and its evidence was available in the records

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House votes to condemn alleged hysterectomies on migrant women

The House adopted a resolution on Friday to formally condemn the alleged forced medical procedures, including hysterectomies, on migrant women detained at an Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) facility in Georgia.

The resolution, which passed 232-157, with 4 lawmakers voting “present,” condemns “performing unwanted, unnecessary medical procedures on individuals without their full, informed consent” and calls for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to comply with investigations into the Irwin County Detention Center in Ocilla, Ga. 

Seven Republicans voted with Democrats in support of the resolution, while Rep. Daniel LipinskiDaniel William LipinskiFive things we learned from this year’s primaries Hispanic Caucus campaign arm endorses slate of non-Hispanic candidates Bottom line MORE (D-Ill.) and Libertarian Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashPresident Trump, Melania Trump test positive for COVID-19 The Hill’s Morning Report – Sponsored by JobsOhio – Trump’s tax return bombshell Ron Paul hospitalized in Texas MORE (Mich.) voted “present.”

A whistleblower complaint filed by a nurse at the detention center reported “jarring medical neglect” and alleged “high rates of hysterectomies done to immigrant women.” It also alleged that ICE did not test migrants who had been exposed to COVID-19 or had symptoms.

DHS opened an investigation into the allegations last month. 

“This is about full or partial sterilization and a total lack of consent from the patient,” Rep. Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalTrump proposes capping refugee admissions at 15,000 in historic low ‘One more serious try’ on COVID-19 relief yields progress but no deal Hillicon Valley: Subpoenas for Facebook, Google and Twitter on the cards | Wray rebuffs mail-in voting conspiracies | Reps. raise mass surveillance concerns MORE (D-Wash.), the author of the resolution, said during House floor debate.

Jayapal noted that 10 lawmakers visited the detention facility last weekend and spoke directly to women who had been impacted.

“We saw their pain and shock and horror about the irreparable damage that has been done to them and their futures,” Jayapal said.

The resolution adopted by the House further states that the chamber “recognizes that everyone deserves to control their own reproductive choices and make informed choices about their bodies.” 

It also calls on DHS to pause the removal of any individual who underwent any procedure at the Irwin County Detention Center and allow individuals who received alleged unnecessary or nonconsensual procedures to be granted “immediate” access to medical treatment or seek a second opinion.

Rep. Tom McClintockThomas (Tom) Milller McClintockHouse to vote on removing cannabis from list of controlled substances House votes to remove Confederate statues from Capitol Cook shifts 20 House districts toward Democrats MORE (R-Calif.) argued during floor debate that lawmakers should wait for an investigation to conclude before adopting the resolution condemning the allegations.

“I would ask the House this very simple question: wouldn’t it be better to let the investigation take its course, have all the facts laid out before us, and then take appropriate actions?” McClintock said.

“If the allegations are true, every bit of the indignation expressed in this resolution and by my

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Boston police investigating alleged attempted rape in Public Garden

Boston police are investigating after a man allegedly attempted to sexually assault a woman as she walked in the Public Garden Monday morning, the department said.

Officers assigned to the sex assault unit responded around 6 a.m. to the park for a report of “an assault with attempt to rape,” the department said in a statement.

A woman told police that the man put his hand over her mouth, “while making sexually explicit threats and attempting to remove an article of clothing,” according to the statement.

The woman was able to free herself and run to safety, police said.

The suspect is described as a Black male, in his 20s or 30s, who has a slim to medium bill and short dreadlocks, the statement said.

Anyone with information about the incident is asked to call police detectives at 617-343-4400.

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2 alleged ISIS supporters in U.S. accused of plotting attacks on White House, Trump Tower

Two men faces charges in connection with an alleged plot to bomb or shoot at high-profile sites in the U.S., including the White House and Trump Tower in New York City, a federal complaint shows.

Jaylyn Christopher Molina, of Texas, and Kristopher Sean Matthews, of South Carolina, face charges of conspiracy to provide material support to a designated foreign terrorist organization.

An email and phone call to Molina’s attorney seeking comment did not receive an immediate response. Court records do not list an attorney for Matthews.

According to a criminal complaint filed in the federal court for the Western District of Texas, Molina and Matthews used an online chat group in 2019 to discuss attacking U.S. targets on behalf of ISIS. The pair also allegedly discussed traveling to Syria to fight with the Islamic State group.

They were allegedly studying how to build car bombs, suicide belts and other explosives and discussed plans for attacks with others on an encrypted messaging application.

Matthews told Molina that they needed four recruits to carry out multisite attacks “that could be Netflix worthy,” the complaint said.

On Saturday, FBI agents arrested Matthews in Cleveland City, Tennessee, and Molina in Gonzales, Texas, a city about 75 miles east of San Antonio, according to special agent Michelle Lee. She declined to comment further on the case.

Nicole Acevedo contributed.

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2 alleged ISIS supporters accused of plot to attack White House, Trump Tower

Two men faces charges in connection with an alleged plot to bomb or shoot at high-profile sites in the U.S., including the White House and Trump Tower in New York City, a federal complaint shows.



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Jaylyn Christopher Molina, of Texas, and Kristopher Sean Matthews, of South Carolina, face charges of conspiracy to provide material support to a designated foreign terrorist organization.

An email and phone call to Molina’s attorney seeking comment did not receive an immediate response. Court records do not list an attorney for Matthews.

According to a criminal complaint filed in the federal court for the Western District of Texas, Molina and Matthews used an online chat group in 2019 to discuss attacking U.S. targets on behalf of ISIS. The pair also allegedly discussed traveling to Syria to fight with the Islamic State group.

They were allegedly studying how to build car bombs, suicide belts and other explosives and discussed plans for attacks with others on an encrypted messaging application.

Matthews told Molina that they needed four recruits to carry out multisite attacks “that could be Netflix worthy,” the complaint said.

On Saturday, FBI agents arrested Matthews in Cleveland City, Tennessee, and Molina in Gonzales, Texas, a city about 75 miles east of San Antonio, according to special agent Michelle Lee. She declined to comment further on the case.

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Pelosi, Democrats unveil bills to rein in alleged White House abuses of power

Leading House Democrats on Wednesday unveiled sweeping legislation empowering Congress with more muscular oversight and anti-corruption tools to rein in alleged presidential abuses — present and future.

Behind Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiPelosi: Trump hurrying to fill SCOTUS seat so he can repeal ObamaCare House lawmakers reach deal to avert shutdown Centrist Democrats ‘strongly considering’ discharge petition on GOP PPP bill MORE (D-Calif.), the Democrats are hoping to bolster the congressional checks on the executive branch, as outlined by the Constitution, including efforts to curb abuses of presidential pardons; prevent presidents from profiting personally from the office; and secure administrative compliance with congressional subpoenas.

The legislation has no chance of becoming law while Republicans control the Senate and President TrumpDonald John TrumpOmar fires back at Trump over rally remarks: ‘This is my country’ Pelosi: Trump hurrying to fill SCOTUS seat so he can repeal ObamaCare Trump mocks Biden appearance, mask use ahead of first debate MORE remains in the White House. But it highlights the laundry list of abuse allegations Democrats have lodged against the president over the last four years — and provides Democrats with political ammunition as Congress prepares to leave Washington for the final sprint to the Nov. 3 elections.

“During this once-in-a-generation moment, the Congress has a sacred obligation for the people to defend the rule of law and restore accountability and basic ethics to the government. And that is exactly what we’re doing [with this package],” Pelosi told reporters in the Capitol.

“It is sad that the president’s actions have made this legislation necessary,” she added. “As with other things, he gives us no choice.”

Crafted by some of the Democrats’ top committee heads, the legislative package takes aim at the some of the most controversial episodes of Trump’s tenure.

One proposal would codify the Constitution’s emoluments clause, which bars presidents and other federal officials from accepting foreign gifts. Another would expedite the judicial process surrounding congressional subpoenas, which the administration has frequently disregarded leading to lengthy court proceedings.

“Congressional subpoenas are not requests that recipients can easily brush aside,” said Rep. Richard NealRichard Edmund NealRep. Bill Pascrell named chair of House oversight panel Rep. Cedric Richmond set to join House Ways and Means Committee Coons beats back progressive Senate primary challenger in Delaware MORE (D-Mass.), head of the Ways and Means Committee. “They are indispensable as a tool that this body uses to investigate potential wrong-doing … and to prevent future abuses.”

The legislation would also lend new teeth to the Hatch Act — which bars federal officials from promoting political interests during their normal course of duties — by establishing fines of up to $50,000 for violations.

Another provision would strengthen Congress’s powers to dictate federal funding by applying penalties to executive officials who misappropriate taxpayer dollars for pet projects. Democrats have long-accused Trump of abusing that power, including an incident when he tapped Pentagon funding to help build his wall at the Mexican border, and another when he withheld federal

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Dads Rough Up Registered Sex Offender Over Alleged Act of Voyeurism in Women’s Bathroom at Cracker Barrel

A 53-year-old registered sex offender who has been charged for voyeuristic acts at least eight times in the past was roughed up after being confronted by the father of a 15-year-old girl. Douglas Lane is accused of hiding out in a bathroom stall at a Cracker Barrel restaurant in Duncan, South Carolina in order to ogle unsuspecting girls.



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Duncan Police Chief Carl Long said that the 15-year-old girl sensed something move at her feet and then spotted Lane looking at her from underneath the bathroom stall walls on Sunday.

According to WSPA, the girl immediately told her dad what happened and the two of them asked a woman who worked at Cracker Barrel to get Lane out of the bathroom. Other girls were reportedly in the bathroom at the time as well.

Police say that the girl’s father then confronted Lane, who is from Charlotte, North Carolina. An unnamed witness said Lane “came running, sprinting out the front door with a very bloody nose.” Lane’s troubles did not stop there, video recorded in the aftermath of the confrontation(s) show:

WYFF reported the several parents who were in the area for a girls softball tournament restrained Lane until police got the scene. A witness said he saw a “lot of good guys” take down Lane as he tried to run away.

Lane’s mugshot also tells the story:



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Spartanburg County Detention Center

Lane was charged for possession of marijuana, drug paraphernalia, and voyeurism. During a bond hearing on Monday, Lane claimed that he’d made an innocent mistake—namely, that he didn’t immediately realize that he was in the women’s bathroom.

The judge ordered Lane, a North Carolina resident, to stay in South Carolina under home detention and be subject to GPS monitoring. Lane is scheduled to appear in court on Nov. 12. It’s not immediately clear if he has an attorney of record.

[Image via WSPA screengrab]

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Florida Panthers part ways with Kitchen after alleged kicking incident

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The Florida Panthers have parted ways with veteran assistant coach Mike Kitchen after he allegedly kicked a Panthers player on the bench during a game this season, multiple sources have told TSN.

Kitchen did not immediately respond to a request for comment. The Panthers said in a news release on Tuesday evening only that “Mike Kitchen will not return as assistant coach,” and declined to offer further comment, citing company policy on personnel matters.

A National Hockey League official confirmed the league has been apprised of an internal investigation by the Panthers.

According to sources, the alleged incident occurred in the third period of Florida’s win in Minnesota on Jan. 20. A Panthers player threw a water bottle on the bench in frustration, dousing Kitchen, who allegedly kicked the player in response.

One source described Kitchen’s kick as “full on,” saying he “reared back and booted [him] in the lower back in anger,” as a result of being soaked.

“This certainly wasn’t a friendly tap of encouragement,” the source said. “There’s no place for anything like that in the game.”

Sources said now former Panthers GM Dale Tallon and head coach Joel Quenneville were notified of the alleged incident immediately following the game.

Tallon was not present at the game, a source said, but no disciplinary action was taken when Tallon rejoined the team the following day in Chicago, ahead of Quenneville’s first game back coaching against the Blackhawks.

That next night was also Kitchen’s first game back in Chicago after helping the Blackhawks to two Stanley Cups in 2013 and 2015 as Quenneville’s top lieutenant.

Kitchen, 64, has been on or behind an NHL bench for more than 3,000 games as a player, assistant coach and head coach – almost consecutively since 1990, including 27 of the last 29 seasons. He has coached the Maple Leafs, Blues, Blackhawks and was on his second stint in South Florida.

Kitchen replaced Quenneville as the Blues’ head coach for parts of three seasons (2004-2006), compiling a 38-70-4-19 record. The two later joined forces again in Chicago, before reuniting in Florida last summer.

After the alleged incident, Kitchen was permitted to continue coaching without apparent punishment through to the NHL pause March 13 as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Kitchen then opted out from participating in Florida’s qualifying-round series against the New York Islanders in the Toronto bubble in August.

At the time, Kitchen said in a statement that not participating was a “difficult decision to say the least, but the right decision for me and my family.” The Panthers said then they “fully support this decision.”

Quenneville recently told reporters that he expected his entire coaching staff to return for the 2021 season, saying Kitchen was involved in coaching when the Panthers returned home from the bubble.

“I know Kitch, and in a lot of ways, I know exactly what makes him work and I think we’ve got a great working relationship,” Quenneville told reporters.

Tallon and the Panthers “mutually agreed

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House Democrats launch investigation into alleged political interference in CDC reports

Washington — House Democrats have launched an investigation into allegations that political appointees at the Department of Health and Human Services have sought to review and alter weekly scientific reports issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) about the coronavirus pandemic.

Democratic members of the Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis are seeking voluntary testimony from seven officials at the Department of Health and Human Services, including Michael Caputo, the agency’s spokesman, and Paul Alexander, his senior adviser.

Politico reported last week that Caputo, who joined the Trump administration in April, and Alexander, who Caputo hired, have attempted to alter or halt the release of the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports (MMWRs), which are written by career scientists and prepared by the health agency. According to the CDC, readership of the reports largely consists of medical workers, epidemiologists, scientists and researchers.

“Political appointees’ attempts to interfere with CDC’s scientific reports, or MMWRs, risk undermining the scientific integrity of these reports and of the CDC itself,” the Democrats wrote in a letter Monday to Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar and CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield.

While experts have relied on the reports during the coronavirus crisis to determine how the virus spreads and who is at risk, “HHS officials apparently viewed these scientific reports as opportunities for political manipulation,” they said.

The Democrats are also requesting Anne Schuchat, principal deputy director of the CDC, and Charlotte Kent, the editor in chief of the MMWR, among others, appear before the coronavirus panel, and want the department to turn over a trove of documents.

Caputo said in a statement to CBS News that the public affairs office at the Department of Health and Human Services “clears virtually all public-facing documents for all of its divisions, including CDC.”

“Dr. Alexander advises me on pandemic policy and he has been encouraged to share his opinions with other scientists. Like all scientists, his advice is heard and taken or rejected by his peers,” he said. “Our intention is to make sure that evidence, science-based data drives policy through this pandemic — not ulterior deep state motives in the bowels of CDC.”

Former Trump Campaign Official Michael Caputo To Be Interviewed By Senate Intelligence Committee Staffers
Michael Caputo

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According to Politico, Caputo and his team have sought to retroactively alter CDC reports they claimed incorrectly inflated the risks of the coronavirus and tried to stop the release of others, including one that discussed how doctors were prescribing hydroxychloroquine, an antimalarial drug touted by President Trump as a treatment for the coronavirus. The report on hydroxychloroquine was published last week after it was held up for months, Politico reported. The Food and Drug Administration revoked an emergency authorization for using hydroxychloroquine to treat COVID patients in June.
 
Politico also said in an article published last week that Alexander claimed in an August 8 email that the CDC was “writing hit pieces on the administration.” Efforts to influence the reports began after a May report from Schuchat detailed the “rapid acceleration of

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